Job Commentaries

JOB RESOURCES
Commentaries, Sermons, Illustrations, Devotionals

The Book of Job
Related Blogpost
Job 1-3 Job 4-37 Job 38-42
PROLOGUE:
SITUATION

Prose
DIALOGUE:
SEARCH

Poetry
EPILOGUE:
SOLUTION

Prose
Conflict Debate Repentance
Dilemma of Job Debate of Job Deliverance of Job
Disasters of Job Dialogues with Job Deliverance of Job
A Great Man
A Great Examination
A Great Discussion A Great Revelation
A Great Vindication
Controversy Between
Jehovah & Satan
(Satan & the Saint)

Controversy Between
Job & Three Friends

Cycle 1
Eliphaz & Job (4-7)
Bildad & Job (8-10)
Zophar & Job (11-14)

Cycle 2

Eliphaz & Job (15-17)

Bildad & Job (18-19)

Zophar & Job (20-21)

Cycle 3

Eliphaz & Job (22-24)

Bildad & Job (25-31)

Elihu & Job (32-37)

Communication Between
Jehovah & Job
Dialogue in Heaven Dialogue on Earth Dialogue Between Heaven & Earth
Job Tested & Despairing Job Counseled Job Approved
The Onset of Suffering The Reality of Suffering The Final Word from God
Challenge of Satan: 1-2
Complaint of Job: 3
Judgments
of Men
Voice
of God
Takes Place:
Heaven & Earth
Takes Place:
Land of Uz (North Arabia)
Takes Place:
Heaven & Earth
Patriarchal Period
(circa 2000 BC)
Author Unknown
The Problem of Pain
The Blessing Through Suffering

Key Words (NAS): Almighty (31x), curse (10x), cry, cries (20x/18v), wicked (34x), sin (25x/23v), iniquity (21x), transgression (9x), sons of God (3x), Satan (14x/11v), how? (25x/24v), why? (22x/19v), perfect (3x), blameless (4x), righteous (12x). right (18x), righteousness (8x), just (4x), wisdom (21x/20v)

Job's Secret for Survival in the Storms of Life - How Could Job Persevere and Hold Fast in the face of such extreme suffering and pain? The answer may lie in the fact that Job held fast to the Word of Truth which in turn anchored him when the winds of adversity blew and the waves of pain rolled over his body and soul. Job 23:12-note he declares "I have not departed from the command of His lips. I have treasured the words of His mouth more than my necessary food." Note what he has just said in context - In Job 23:8-9 clearly Job cannot perceive, see or behold God! And yet he is able to confidently declare "But (contrast with not being able to see Him) He knows the way I take (How did Job know this? Job 23:12-note!). When He has tried me, I shall come forth as gold." (Job 23:10-note). How could he be so confident that the testing and refining would remove the dross and bring his heart and soul forth as "pure gold"? There can be only one answer -- Job knew and believed in the character of God, especially His goodness to His children (cp 2Ti 1:12-note). And how did Job know? Because he had "eaten" and held fast to the living, active, eternal Word of Truth for soul nourishment ("soul food"!), placing a greater value on the powerful Word of Life than he placed even on his daily intake of food necessary for physical nourishment! Many millennia later Job's Redeemer (Job 19:25) declared the same truth that "Man does not live on bread alone but on every word which proceeds from the mouth of God!" (Mt 4:4, Lk 4:4; cp 1Pe 2:2-note, Heb 5:14-note) See In Depth Discussion of this Pivotal Passage Job 23:12

Irving Jensen in his modern classic lists the main purposes of the Book of Job as…

(1) To reveal Who God is.

(2) To show the kind of trust He wants His children to have. (E.g., trust God even though you cannot fully account for your circumstances. Cp 2Cor 4:17-note, 2Cor 4:18-note) Approval by God means “tried and found true” (cf. Ro 16:10-note).

(3) To reveal His favor toward His children and His absolute control over Satan.

(4) To answer man’s questions about why a righteous person may suffer while an evil man may be healthy and prosperous. (Jensen, I. L. Jensen's survey of the Old Testament - recommended)

Was Job a real person? What "saith the LORD?" The Word of God answers through the prophet Ezekiel "even if these three men—Noah, Daniel and Job—were in it, they could save only themselves by their righteousness" (Ezekiel 14:14; see also Ezekiel 14:20). If you doubt Job's existence, you also have to doubt Noah & Daniel both of whom were described as real people by Jesus (Mt 24:15, Mt 24:37-38)

Theology of Job - Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology

The Book of Job from Christ in All the Scriptures by A M Hodgkin

GEORGE BARTON
Commentary on the Book of Job
The Bible for Home and School
1911

BIBLE.ORG RESOURCES
That Reference Job
"The largest Bible Study Resource on the Web"

Hint: Do a "control + find" when you open a "hit" and search Job.
This may take some practice but will yield some "gems"!
Recommended Resource

BIBLICAL ART
Related to the Book of Job

BIBLICAL ILLUSTRATOR
Book of Job
Plethora of sermons, homilies, illustrations

Job 1:1 Sermons organized by chapter and verse - select chap/verse at top of page
Links below are to the full page which includes illustrations, homilies, sermons

ALBERT BARNES
Job Commentary
In Two Volumes - about 800 pages!

Spurgeon's Review: "Exceedingly good. One of the best of this author’s generally valuable productions. The student should purchase this work at once, as it is absolutely necessary to his library." (Commenting and commentaries lectures)

JOSEPH BENSON
Commentary
Book of Job

CAMBRIDGE BIBLE FOR SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES
Job Commentary

RICH CATHERS
Job Sermon Notes
Some survey, some in depth
Calvary Chapel, Fullerton, California

Click for audios

ADAM CLARKE
Job Commentary

Adam Clarke (1760-1832) was Methodist, Wesleyan, Arminian, (e.g., Clarke "suggested that although God can know all future events, he chooses not to know some events beforehand" Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible, page 808). He did not always interpret Scripture literally and so was amillennial (he interpreted Revelation as a Historicist) which led him to interpret the church as fulfilling many OT promises to Israel. Influential in development of doctrine of entire sanctification. Affirmed the authority and sufficiency of Scripture, but held a belief of "plenary dynamic inspiration" (idea of every thought inspired), thus falling short of "plenary verbal inspiration" (every single word inspired) (Bib. Sacra: Vol 125, p 163, 1968). In summary, a useful, respected commentary but as with all these resources you are advised to "Be a Berean!"

COMMENTARY CRITICAL AND EXPLANATORY
ON THE WHOLE BIBLE
- JOB -
Robert Jamieson, A. R. Fausset and David Brown.
Published 1871

See Also the Unabridged Version
Reliable Resource

THOMAS CONSTABLE
Commentary

RON DANIEL
Sermon Notes on Job

A B DAVIDSON
Cambridge Bible Commentary
Book of Job

Rosscup writes: "This is a detailed investigation of the text verse by verse and has much to offer."

Spurgeon adds "Strict grammatical treatment of Scripture is always commendable, and in this case the results are valued by advanced scholars."

SAMUEL DRIVER
& George Gray
A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on
Book of Job

In Depth
Volume 2 - Philological Notes - Knowledge of Hebrew necessary

JOHN DUMMELOW
Commentary on the Holy Bible
The Book of Job

In Depth

THEODORE EPP
Devotionals Related to Job
Backtothebible.org
Updated February 20, 2015

EXPOSITOR'S BIBLE COMMENTARY
Book of Job
Robert A Watson

Warren W. Wiersbe - If you can locate the six-volume edition of the Expositor’s Bible, buy it immediately! It takes up less space than the original fifty-volume set, and not everything in the original set is worth owning. Samuel H. Kellogg on Leviticus is a classic; so is Alexander Maclaren on the Psalms and on Colossians. (A Basic Library for Bible Students)

Cyril J. Barber - This set, originally published in 1903, contains expositions by both conservative and liberal theologians. The most important works are by Dod (Genesis), Chadwick (Exodus and Mark), Kellogg (Leviticus), Blaikie (Joshua, I and II Samuel), Adeney (Ezra, Nehemiah and Esther), Maclaren (Psalms), Moule (Romans), Findlay (Galatians and Ephesians), Plummer (Pastoral Epistles and the Epistles of James and Jude), and Milligan (Revelation.) (The Minister’s Library)

EXPOSITOR'S DICTIONARY OF TEXTS
Book of Job
Interesting Resource

A C GAEBELEIN
Annotated Bible Commentary
Book of Job

EDWARD GIBSON
Job Commentary
Westminster Commentaries
Well Done Exposition
1899

JOHN GILL
Job Commentary

GOTQUESTIONS
Book of Job

L M GRANT
Comments on the
Book of Job

JOE GUGLIELMO
Survey or Overview Type Notes
Calvary Chapel of Manitowoc
Updated February 20, 2015

DAVE GUZIK
Job Commentary
Conservative, Evangelical, Millennial Perspective

ROBERT HAWKER
Job Commentary
Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

F. B. HOLE
Job Commentary

HYMNS
Relating to Job

MATTHEW HENRY'S
Job Commentary
(1706)

KEIL and DELITZSCH
Old Testament Commentary on Job

Spurgeon quotes another source: "Unquestionably the most valuable work on this inexhaustibly interesting Scripture that has reached us from Germany.”—Nonconformist.

PAUL E KRETZMANN
Popular Commentary
Book of Job
Lutheran Perspective

STANLEY LEATHES
Old Testament Commentary
For English Readers
Job - Edited by C J Ellicott
1884

ALEXANDER MACLAREN
Sermons on Job

J VERNON MCGEE
'Thru the Bible'
Mp3's on Job

F B MEYER
Devotionals
Most from Our Daily Homily
Two from Our Daily Word

HENRY MORRIS
Defender's Study Bible Notes
On Job
Updated February 20, 2015

MISCELLANEOUS
Resources
on the Book of Job

GENERAL RESOURCES
ON JOB

Job Articles free online…

GENERAL RESOURCES
ON JOB

BRUCE HURT

  • What was Job's "secret" for surviving such severe suffering? See the following commentary notes for a clue as to how Job could endure especially Job 23:12 - Job 23:10; Job 23:11; Job 23:12

HENRY MORRIS

HOLMAN PUBLISHING

REFORMATION STUDY BIBLE

BEST COMMENTARIES

Rosscup on Andersen's Job (Tyndale Old Testament Commentaries) - Andersen has provided one of the best modern and informed expositions of the text of Job, displaying intimate familiarity with the Hebrew and cognate languages and literature (as well as referring to a broad range of English literature). He utilizes a good, almost conversational style and closely analyzes the text. Not all evangelicals will be pleased with Andersen’s cyclical theory of composition (which he sees as reaching completion by 750 B. C., although he allows that composition could have occurred any time between Moses and Ezra). This is a valuable aid to exposition.—Dan Phillips. He dates job during Solomon’s reign. On problem texts he gives views, as on 19:23–27, where he believes Job refers to a real meeting with God after death, though does not feel there is a full statement of a faith in bodily resurrection here (this point has been much debated). The verse by verse commentary is good most of the time, and Andersen is quite abreast of modern research on the book.—J. E. Rosscup. (Commentaries For Biblical Expositors)

Rosscup has an interesting comment on the number one choice of Challies and Matheson - Clines' Word Biblical Commentary - In many texts this is careful in handling details of text, syntax, views and reasons. Clines’ grasp and use of scholarly writings enriches his effort, which seems of a conservative nature in many passages. He sees the story set in patriarchal times, but a writer between the seventh and second centuries B. C. using compositions from centuries before (a view that many will feel problematic). While so often productive on many aspects, Clines is a big disappointment in concluding on a key text, Job 19:25, that Job’s redeemer is not God but Job himself in a personified plea, however that can be, which is not altogether clear. (Ibid)

Rosscup on John Hartley's The Book of Job - It is good to see this firmly evangelical work. This is evident in many places. However, Hartley is subjective and without real necessity in shuffling Job 27:13–23 to Chapter 25, etc. Generally, his careful handling of the text, syntax, views and reasoning constitute this one of the best conservative works on Job. (Ibid)

Rosscup on Roy Zuck's Job- Everyman's Bible Commentary - Zuck, a Biola University graduate, Associate Academic Dean and Associate Professor of Bible Exposition at Dallas Theological Seminary, has written this 192-pp. paperback for the Everyman’s Bible Commentary. Written in thirteen chapters for use in Sunday school, this volume assumes a thoroughly orthodox position with reference to all critical areas. In addition, Zuck reckons a patriarchal time setting (perhaps akin to Terah’s time?). One helpful section is Zuck’s treatment of chapters 20 and 21 and the repartee between Zophar and Job. Zuck views the grand purpose of the book as dealing with motives behind worship. He sees its solemn lesson in the futility of criticizing God’s ways. This volume is recommended for home Bible studies and Sunday school.—Jan Sattem (Ibid)

ALISTAIR BEGG

JOHN BERRIDGE
(Read fascinating Biography)

BIBLE.ORG ILLUSTRATIONS

Job 13:15 Trusting God in Trials

Mary Kimbrough composed this poem based in Job 13:15, which underscores the wisdom of trusting God through trial:

“Though He slay me, I will trust Him,”

Said the sainted Job of old;

“Though He try me in the furnace,

I shall then come forth as gold.

“Though the ‘worms of deep affliction’

Cause this body to decay,

In my flesh I shall behold Him —

My Redeemer—some glad day.”

“Though He slay me”—can I say it

When I feel the searing fire,

When my fondest dreams lie shattered —

Gone my hope and fond desire'

“Though He slay me, I will trust Him,”

For He knows just how to mold,

How to melt and shape my spirit —

I shall then come forth as gold!

Our Daily Bread, January 3, 1995

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Job 38ff God Explodes - God doesn’t explain. He explodes. He asks Job who he thinks he is anyway. He says that to try to explain the kind of things Job wants explained would be like trying to explain Einstein to a little-neck clam… God doesn’t reveal his grand design. He reveals himself. (Frederick Buechner, Wishful Thinking, p. 46, quoted in Disappointment With God, Philip Yancey, Zondervan, p. 190)

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Job 41:21 - Leviathan - “In that day the LORD with his sore and great and strong sword shall punish leviathan the piercing serpent, even leviathan that crooked serpent; and He shall slay the dragon that is in the sea” (Isaiah 27:1). There is a remarkable animal called a “leviathan,” described in the direct words of God in the 41st chapter of Job. It is surprising that most modern expositors call this animal merely a crocodile. Our text plainly calls it a “piercing serpent… the dragon that is in the sea.” He is also said to “play” in the “great and wide sea” (Psalm 104:25,26). God’s description, in Job 41, says “a flame goeth out of his mouth” (Job 41:21) and “he maketh the deep to boil like a pot” (Job 41:31). The entire description is awesome! Whatever a leviathan might have been , it was not a crocodile! In fact, there is no animal living today which fits the description. Therefore, it is an extinct animal, almost certainly a great marine reptile, still surviving in the oceans of Job’s day, evidently one of the fearsome reptiles that gave rise to the worldwide tales of great sea dragons, before they became extinct. But that is not all. In ending His discourse, God called leviathan “a king over all the children of pride” (Job 41:34), so the animal is also symbolic of Satan, whose challenge to God instigated Job’s strange trials. He is “the great dragon… that old serpent, called the Devil, and Satan, which deceiveth the whole world” (Revelation 12:9). Perhaps, therefore, the mysterious and notorious extinction of the dinosaurs is a secular prophecy of the coming Day of Judgment when God “shall punish leviathan” (Isaiah 27:1) and the “devil that deceived them” will be “cast into the lake of fire… and shall be tormented day and night forever and ever” (Revelation 20:10). HMM Our Daily Bread, Saturday, October 31.

BIBLICAL ART

IMANUEL CHRISTIAN

DEVOTIONALS

DICTIONARY ARTICLES

A M HODGKIN

Christ in the Poetical Books - Job --

In whatever aspect we look at it, the Book of Job is perhaps the most wonderful poem that has ever been written. Tennyson called it ''the greatest poem whether of ancient or modern literature.'' Luther regarded it as ''more magnificent and sublime than any other book of Scripture.''

The scene is laid in patriarchal times, and it is said to be the oldest book in existence. That Job was a real person is settled by Scripture itself. Through the prophet Ezekiel, God says of the land: ''Though these three men, Noah, Daniel and Job, were in it, they should deliver but their own souls'' (Ezek 14:14,20).

The book is wonderful in the beauty of its language, in the wide sweep of knowledge it displays, in its scientific accuracy. It is wonderful in that it deals with the mystery of pain, and with the riddle of all times, ''Why do the righteous suffer?'' It lifts the veil of the spirit world, and teaches us both the extent and the limit of the power of Satan. It is wonderful in clearly revealing the fact of the resurrection, and, above all, in foreshadowing the mystery of redemption.

The language of the book is sublime in its simplicity. The pathos of Job's description of his sufferings has found an echo in countless souls who have been brought into God's crucible. As Elihu describes the gathering storm, we can see the clouds rolling up, the flashing of the lightning, and hear the roar of the thunder. Out of the midst of the storm God speaks.

God's Book.

Though the object of the Bible is not to teach science, its language is always abreast of the latest discoveries. This is nowhere more noticeable than in the Book of Job.

''He hangeth the earth upon nothing'' (Job 26:7). What could more accurately describe the poise of our world in space?

''Canst thou bind the sweet influence of the Pleiades?'' (Job 38:31). Alcyone, the brightest of these seven stars, is actually, so far as it is known the pivot around which our whole solar system revolves. How mighty and at once how sweet must be its influence to hold these worlds in place at such a distance and to swing them round so smoothly!

''The morning-stars sang together'' (Job 38:7). Only modern science has discovered that the rays of light are vocal, and that if our ears were more finely tuned we should hear them (see Ps 19:1-3).

''By what way is the light parted?'' (Job 38:24). Could language more exact be employed even after the discoveries of the spectrum analysis?

Had Bildad been taught the chemical absorption of chlorophyll by plants from light, he could have used no [more exact] term than this: ''He is green (or, 'is full of juice') before the sun'' (Job 8:16).

The Mystery of Suffering.

The Book of Job deals with the mystery of human suffering, especially the suffering of the righteous. Job's friends erred in thinking that all suffering is God's special judgment upon some special sin. ''Who ever perished, being innocent?'' (Job 4:7) was the burden of all their consolation. They reckoned that Job's sin against God must be exceptionally great to account for such exceptional suffering. In this connection, it is important to remember Job's attitude towards God. He was one who, having access to Him through the blood of sacrifice (Job 1:5), was walking with Him in integrity of heart and conformity of life.

God's own testimony of him was, ''There is none like him in the earth, a perfect and an upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil'' (Job 1:8). ''Of all men, he was the one most fitted to be entrusted with the service of suffering, being chosen as a pattern of the ways of God in the ages to come, for all His children in the service of trial.'' [quoted from The Story of Job, by Mrs. Penn-Lewis.] Job knew that his heart was true to God, and he could not accept the accusations of his friends. He shows them that their conclusion is false, and that the wicked often prosper in the world. ''They gather the vintage of the wicked'' (24:6). One of the elements of danger in a course of sin is that it is so often successful. The young man who wins his first stake in gambling is in far greater peril than the one who loses.

Chastisement.

Elihu, who had been listening to the argument of Job and his friends, sums up their discussion in two terse sentences: ''Against Job was his wrath kindled, because he justified himself rather than God. Also against his three friends was his wrath kindled, because they had found no answer, and yet had condemned Job'' (Job 32:2,3). Elihu was a true messenger from God to Job, and brought out His gracious purpose in the chastisement of His children. Elihu's words prepare the way for God's own revelation of Himself which followed. Chastisement is the Key-note of this book. [cp. Heb 12:5-11]

Spectators of the Conflict.

But God has a deeper purpose in the suffering of His children than even their personal perfection. We have the clue in the words of Paul: ''To the intent that now, unto the principalities and powers in heavenly places, might be known by the Church, the manifold wisdom of God'' (Eph 3:10,11). An unseen cloud of witnesses is eagerly watching the conflict carried on in the arena of this little world. God is unfolding to the angels of light and to the hosts of darkness ''the eternal purposes'' of His grace in His dealings with His redeemed children on the earth. The adversary had challenged the integrity of Job in the council of heaven, and God's honor is in question. How little did Job realize the issues which hung upon his steadfastness, when he said, ''The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away; blessed be the Name of the Lord'' [Job 1:21]; and again, ''Though He slay me, yet will I trust in Him'' [Job 13:15]. How little the Church today realizes the issues which hang upon her faithfulness, or God would find among those who trust Him a larger number of saints whom He could trust.

The Adversary.

Both the extent and the limit of Satan's power are brought out in this book. He had power to bring up the hordes of hostile Sabeans and Chaldeans to carry off the oxen and the asses and the camels. He had power to manipulate the lightning to consume the sheep, to summon the wind to slay Job's children, and to smite Job himself with a terrible disease; for is he not the Prince of the power of the air, the spirit that now worketh in the children of disobedience? [Eph 2:2]. And did he not bring against Paul a thorn in the flesh, the messenger of Satan to buffet him? [2Cor 12:7]. But, on the other hand, he had no power at all, except in so far as God permitted him to break through the protecting hedge with which He had surrounded His servant (Job 1:10). What comfort there is here for the child of God: no calamity can touch him except as his Father permits it; and He who has ''shut up the sea with doors,'' and said, ''Hitherto shalt thou come, but no further; and here shall thy proud waves be stayed'' (Job 38:8-11), will never suffer us to be tempted above that we are able, or allow the furnace to be hotter than we can bear [1Cor 10:13].

We have, in the Book of Job, not merely the theory of suffering, but a living example of one of God's children placed in the crucible, and the effect of it upon his life. Because God trusted Job, He assigned to him the ministry of suffering. Because He loved him, He chastened him [Heb 12:6]. Even in the midst of his anguish, Job recognized that it is only the gold that is worth putting in the fire. Job, in his prosperity and uprightness and benevolence, was in danger of becoming self-confident, and not recognizing that he had only held his power and position in trust for God. But as God dealt with him, we see him broken (Job 16:12,14; 17:11) and melted (23:10) and softened, so that he could say, ''The hand of God hath touched me'' (Job 19:21); ''God maketh my heart soft'' (Job 23:16).

''Now mine Eye seeth Thee.''

But it was the vision of God Himself that completed the work and brought Job into the very dust. He had protested that he was prepared to reason with God over His strange dealings with him [eg. Job 10:2; 13:3]. But when God took him at his word and said, ''Shall he that contendeth with the Almighty instruct Him?'' Job replied, ''Behold, I am vile (or, contemptibly mean [low, common] ); I will lay mine hand upon my mouth'' [Job 40:1-4]. God continued to deal with him until Job was brought to the very end of himself, and cried out, ''I have uttered that I understood not; things too wonderful for me, which I knew not. I have heard of Thee by the hearing of the ear; but now mine eye seeth Thee: wherefore I abhor myself, and repent in dust an ashes'' (Job 42:1-6).

God's ''Afterward.''

God's chastened, softened servant is now ready to intercede at God's command for the friends who had so aggravated his woe. Before his own misery is relieved, he offers the appointed sacrifice which they have brought, and prays for them. As he does so, God turns the captivity of Job, and his prosperity returns to him, doubled in every particular. Twice as many sheep and camels and oxen and asses fell to Job's portion as before-- but only the same number of children, seven sons and three daughters. We have here the most beautiful intimation of the certainty of resurrection. Job's prayers had evidently been answered, and his sacrifices accepted, on his children's behalf [Job 1:5], and the fact that he was only given the same number [of children] as before was God's assurance that those who had been taken were safe in His keeping, ''where the wicked cease from troubling, and the weary are at rest'' (Job 3:17).

''My Redeemer Liveth.''

Job's vision of the future life had been obscure at first, for we find him asking the question, ''If a man die, shall he live again?'' (Job 14:14). But with his affliction his faith grows, and he answers his own question in the glorious words: ''I know that my Redeemer liveth, and that He shall stand at the latter day upon the dust: and though after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God: Whom I shall see for myself and on my side. Mine eyes shall behold Him and not a stranger'' (literal translation, Job 19:25-27). However dimly Job himself may have understood the Spirit-given words, what a vision of the future life we have here, what a prophecy of the coming Savior, sounding forth in the earliest ages! Job sees Him as the Goel, the Kinsman Redeemer-- not a stranger; the One who, because He is the next of kin, has the right to redeem.

Again and again, in this book, we have the foreshadowing of the Savior. We see Him in the accepted sacrifices which Job offered for his children as the book opens, and for his friends as it closes.

We see Him in Job's question, ''How shall man be just before God?'' [Job 9:2]. A question answered only in Him who has justified us ''by His blood'' (Rom 5:9).

One Mediator.

We see Him in the ''Daysman,'' the ''Umpire,'' [whom] Job longs for between him and God. ''For He is not a man, as I am, that I should answer Him, and we should come together in judgment. Neither is there any Daysman betwixt us, that might lay His hand upon us both'' (Job 9:32,33). The need of the human heart has only been met in ''God our Savior,'' the one Mediator between God and men-- Himself, Man-- Christ Jesus, who gave Himself a ransom for all'' (1Tim 2:4-6, R.V.).

A Ransom.

Yet once more, we see Christ again, in the words of Elihu, ''Then He is gracious unto him, and saith, Deliver him from going down to the pit; I have found a ransom'' (margin, ''atonement'') [Job 33:24]. The ransom prophesied by Elihu and the ransom proclaimed by Paul are one [1Tim 2:6]. ''Job had seen his Redeemer as the living One who would vindicate him in the day of His coming, but [He] let him now see Him as the ransom, the One who would be gracious to him, and deliver him from going down into the pit-- not on the ground of Job's integrity, but on the ground of His own shed blood as the price paid for the redemption of fallen man.'' [quoted from The Story of Job, by Mrs. Penn-Lewis.]

The next verse gives the result of this ransom. ''His flesh shall be fresher than a child's: he shall pray unto God, and He shall be favorable unto him; and he shall see His face with joy.'' Cleansing and communion resting on the ground of full atonement.

Yet once again, we see the Cross dimly foreshadowed in Job's sufferings. His sufferings were through the enmity of Satan. ''The suffering upright man pointed the way to the suffering sinless man-- the Man of Sorrows.'' [cp. Isa 53:3]. Job was wounded by his friends. He was ''the song and by-word'' of base men. ''They spare not to spit in my face… My soul is poured out upon me… my bones are pierced in me. He hath cast me into the mire, and I am become like dust and ashes. I cry unto Thee, and Thou dost not answer me'' (Job 30:1-31).

How closely all this answers to the description of the suffering Savior [cp. Ps 22]. But while Job complained and justified himself, the sinless Lamb of God was dumb before His shearers, and poured out His soul a sacrifice for our sins [Isa 53:7,12].

JOHN MACARTHUR

Here is Dr MacArthur's excellent outline of Job

I. The Dilemma (Job 1:1–2:13)

A. Introduction of Job (Job 1:1–5)

B. Divine Debates with Satan (Job 1:6–2:10)

C. Arrival of Friends (Job 2:11–13)

II. The Debates (Job 3:1–37:24)

A. The First Cycle (Job 3:1–14:22)

1. Job’s first speech expresses despair (Job 3:1–26)

2. Eliphaz’s first speech kindly protests and urges humility and repentance (Job 4:1–5:27)

3. Job’s reply to Eliphaz expresses anguish and questions the trials, asking for sympathy in his pain (Job 6:1–7:21)

4. Bildad’s first speech accuses Job of impugning God (Job 8:1–22)

5. Job’s response to Bildad admits he is not perfect, but may protest what seems unfair (Job 9:1–10:22)

6. Zophar’s first speech tells Job to get right with God (Job 11:1–20)

7. Job’s response to Zophar tells his friends they are wrong and only God knows and will, hopefully, speak to him (Job 12:1–14:22)

B. The Second Cycle (Job 15:1–21:34)

1. Eliphaz’s second speech accuses Job of presumption and disregarding the wisdom of the ancients (Job 15:1–35)

2. Job’s response to Eliphaz appeals to God against his unjust accusers (Job 16:1–17:16)

3. Bildad’s second speech tells Job he is suffering just what he deserves (Job 18:1–21)

4. Job’s response to Bildad cries out to God for pity (Job 19:1–29)

5. Zophar’s second speech accuses Job of rejecting God by questioning His justice (Job 20:1–29)

6. Job’s response to Zophar says he is out of touch with reality (Job 21:1–34)

C. The Third Cycle (Job 22:1–26:14)

1. Eliphaz’s third speech denounces Job’s criticism of God’s justice (Job 22:1–30)

2. Job’s response to Eliphaz is that God knows he is without guilt, and yet in His providence and refining purpose He permits temporary success for the wicked (Job 23:1–24:25)

3. Bildad’s third speech scoffs at Job’s direct appeal to God (Job 25:1–6)

4. Job’s response to Bildad that God is indeed perfectly wise and absolutely sovereign, but not simplistic as they thought (Job 26:1–14)

D. The Final Defense of Job (Job 27:1–31:40)

1. Job’s first monologue affirms his righteousness and that man can’t discover God’s wisdom (Job 27:1–28:28)

2. Job’s second monologue remembers his past, describes his present, defends his innocence, and asks for God to defend him (Job 29:1–31:40)

E. The Speeches of Elihu (Job 32:1–37:24)

1. Elihu enters into the debate to break the impasse (Job 32:1–22)

2. Elihu charges Job with presumption in criticizing God, not recognizing that God may have a loving purpose, even in allowing Job to suffer (Job 33:1–33)

3. Elihu declares that Job has impugned God’s integrity by claiming that it does not pay to lead a godly life (Job 34:1–37)

4. Elihu urges Job to wait patiently for the Lord (Job 35:1–16)

5. Elihu believes that God is disciplining Job (Job 36:1–21)

6. Elihu argues that human observers can hardly expect to understand adequately God’s dealings in administering justice and mercy (Job 36:22–37:24)

III. The Deliverance (Job 38:1–42:17)

A. God Interrogates Job (Job 38:1–41:34)

1. God’s first response to Job (Job 38:1–40:2)

2. Job’s answer to God (Job 40:3–5)

3. God’s second response to Job (Job 40:6–41:34)

B. Job Confesses, Worships, and Is Vindicated (Job 42:1–17)

1. Job passes judgment upon himself (Job 42:1–6)

2. God rebukes Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar (Job 42:7–9)

3. God restores Job’s family, wealth, and long life (Job 42:10–17)

DAVID MALICK

MIDDLETOWN BIBLE

J R MILLER

G CAMPBELL MORGAN

Rosscup - This is a good synthesis which helps to trace the developing thought of the book of Job. A detailed outline is given. (Commentaries For Biblical Expositors)

NIV STUDY BIBLE INTRODUCTION

WILLIAM W. ORR

MYER PEARLMAN

WILLIAM S PLUMER

WIL POUNDS

RBC MINISTRIES

CHARLES STANLEY

See Also: Living A New Life: OT Teaching About Conversion by William D Barrick

RAY STEDMAN

CHUCK SWINDOLL
JOB OVERVIEW BOOK CHART

Job Overview = Why is Job so important? The Israelites categorized Job within their wisdom literature. The book includes language from ancient legal proceedings, laments, and unique terms not found elsewhere in the Bible. In addition, the majority of Job is written in parallel lines which are indicative of poetry. The book delves into issues near to the heart of every human who experiences suffering. The prologue provides a fascinating peek into the back story—why God allowed Satan to afflict Job with such pain and turmoil. Then, through a series of dialogues and monologues arranged in a pattern of threes, human wisdom attempts to explain the unexplainable, until finally God Himself speaks. The final chapters of Job record God’s masterful defense of His majesty and unique “otherness”—of God’s eternal transcendence above creation—in contrast with Job’s humble and ignorant mortality. “Where were you when I laid the foundation of the earth? / Tell Me, if you have understanding” (Job 38:4).

What's the big idea? Job’s plight of undeserved suffering compels us to ask the age-old question, “Why do bad things happen to good people?” The answer given to Job may or may not satisfy the reader. God allows pain for good reason, but He may never reveal those reasons. Job did not reject God, but Job did challenge and accuse Him. The Almighty quieted Job decisively when He finally thundered His own perspective on the situation. God did not answer Job’s question of “Why?”—He instead overwhelmed Job and his friends with the truth of His majesty and sovereignty. Job came away with a deeper sense of God’s power and splendor, trusting Him more: “I have heard of You by the hearing of the ear; But now my eye sees You; Therefore I retract, And I repent in dust and ashes.” (Job 42:5–6)

How do I apply this? - Pain inevitably afflicts each one of us. Suffering is unavoidable in this life. Will your relationship with God be enough when trials come? Will you trust Him through your suffering? Read Job 38–42. Spend time with the Almighty. Pray for a stronger faith in the powerful Creator described in those chapters. Pray for a right perspective of Him so that you might see your situation through His eyes. Instead of asking where God is in the midst of your pain, the book of Job affirms God’s control and asks us, “Where are we in our pain? Are we trusting our Creator, even though we cannot understand our circumstances?”

JAMES VAN DINE

PAUL VAN GORDER

Job is classified as one of the poetical books of the Old Testament. It may be the most ancient of the Bible writings. That such a man really lived is sufficiently proved by the testimony of the Holy Spirit in Ezekiel 14:14,20 and James 5:11 where his name is mentioned. Job lived in the time of the patriarchs, probably long before the days of Moses. He offered sacrifices on behalf of his family, and no reference is made in Job to the book of the Law given from Sinai. Another indication of the early writing of the book is the fact that Job lived to be approximately 210 years of age.

No other Bible book contains as much scientific truth as Job (Listen to Dr Henry Morris talk on The Remarkable Record of Job - YouTube). Consider, for example the passage that says God ''hangeth the earth upon nothing'' (26:7). Job's contemporaries all believed that the earth was flat, and that it rested on the shoulders of one of the gods, or the back of an elephant or giant sea turtle. Think of it! Startlingly accurate scientific statements written more than 3,000 years before the discovery of America!

We may well write over the entire book the word ''tested.'' Job's name means ''persecuted.'' The theme of the book sounds forth loud and clear: ''He knoweth the way that I take; when He hath tested me, I shall come forth as gold.'' (Job 23:10).

OUTLINE OF THE BOOK--

Prologue (Job 1:1-2:8): A look behind the scenes.

Job and His Wife (Job 2:9,10)

Job and His Three Friends (Job 2:11-31:40)

Job and Elihu (Job 32-37)

Jehovah and Job (Job 38-41)

Job's Final Answer (Job 42:1-6)

Epilog (Job 42:7-17)

The overriding question in the book of Job is this: ''Why do the godly suffer?''

FOUR DIFFERENT ANSWERS--

The above question is answered in the book of Job from four principal and divergent viewpoints. We will consider these representative opinions about why people suffer.

(1) Satan's view.

Satan hurled the challenge into the face of God that His people love and serve Him only to gain temporal advantage. Hear the adversary say, ''Doth Job fear God for nothing?'' (Job 1:9). God named that evil insinuation the devil's lie. In effect, God said to Satan, ''There are men on earth who will follow me in poverty.'' The record tells us that Job fell down upon the ground and worshiped God, saying, ''Naked came I out of my mother's womb, and naked shall I return there. The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away; blessed be the name of the Lord'' (Job 1:21). But God went beyond this to prove to Satan that there are men on earth who will trust Him even while their bodies are wracked with pain and disease (see Job's remarks in Job 2:7-10). We must note this: it often takes more faith to suffer than it does to be healed. God places that faith just as high on the scroll as any other. Look again at Hebrews 11:1-34, then read carefully verses 35-39. Yes, God does honor suffering faith.

(2) The view of Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar.

These three friends of Job came to the conclusion that the suffering of the righteous is punishment for known, but perhaps secret, sins. This viewpoint is refuted by God's Word and the experience of Job. Eliphaz expressed his opinion that suffering is punishment for sin in these words: ''Remember, I pray thee, who ever perished, being innocent? Or where were the righteous cut off?'' (Job 4:7). Be assured of this: not all of ''Job's comforters'' are dead. A pernicious doctrine that is extant today says that sickness is always the result of sin or that people don't get well because they lack faith. People who believe this do not understand the book of Job.

(3) The view of Elihu.

This wise man pictured God as a great God. He gave us a noble and true accounting of man and suffering. But Elihu was conceited, and he was guilty of the very thing of which he accused Job.

(4) God's view.

God finally confronted Job and, in a unique revelation of Himself, gave him a discourse on His attributes. In his response, Job expressed God's solution to the problem of human suffering in his own words (Job 42:1-6). They could be summed up this way: The godly are afflicted so that they may be brought to self-knowledge and self-judgment. Afflictions are purifying. Job was a good man, but he was self-righteous. The book of Job is a picture of the situation that is stated in 1Corinthians 11:31,32; Luke 22:31,32; and 1Corinthians 5:5.

THE LORD JESUS IN THE BOOK--

Job longed for a mediator (Job 9:32,33). The word translated ''daysman'' in verse 33 means ''mediator.'' He realized that he was a fallen man, the offspring of Adam. He knew that in heaven was a holy God, and that between him and God was a vast gulf. His cry was for a kinsman-redeemer, and by faith he saw the God-man. ''For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man, Christ Jesus'' (1Timothy 2:5).

Job's vision of a future life had been obscure, as witnessed by his question, ''If a man die, shall he live again?'' (Job 14:14). But a light broke upon his soul, for later we hear him exclaim, ''For I know that my Redeemer liveth, and that He shall stand at the latter day upon the earth; and though after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God'' (Job 19:25,26). Job understood the process of bodily disintegration, but with the eye of faith he also saw the resurrection and his Redeemer standing upon this earth. He saw himself in a future body of flesh, for he said of Christ, ''Whom I shall see for myself, and mine eyes shall behold, and not another'' (Job 19:27).

Yes, this is just one more proof of the validity of our Lord's words, ''They… testify of Me'' (John 5:39).

A PRACTICAL THOUGHT--A right view of God, a right view of self, and then a right view of others is the correct order. The blessings described in Job 42:10 were the result of a vision of God that followed with an abhorrence of self, tears of repentance, the sweet odor of burnt offering, and the embrace of love (Job 42:11).

COMMENTARIES AND SERMONS
ON JOB

CHARLES AKED

Logos.com: Aked presents the book of Job as a drama, dividing the book into major themes and characters. He examines the literary aspects of the text, such as style and characterization. In an engaging and easy to read style, Aked helps the reader see this book of the Old Testament in a panoramic view, as well as understanding the key elements of Job.

DON ANDERSON

CHARLES J BALL

Logos.com: Ball examines the text and interpretation of the book of Job. He offers a new translation of a few of the speeches in this book, then some commentary on the entire text. He focuses on the philology and semantics of the Hebrew text, as well as providing valuable exegesis. Ball believes that the character and goodness of God in all situations is the key theme to this book. In order to understand this doctrine, Ball leads the reader on an exegetical and historical journey through this book of the Old Testament.

CHARLES J BALL

Logos.com: First delivered as a series of twelve lectures at Westminster Abbey in 1885 and 1886, bible scholar George Granville Bradley presents his study on the book of Job. He gives the historical, social, and Hebraic context for the book in the introduction, as well as a linguistic and poetical examination. Bradley also compares the book of Job with Psalms, Proverbs, Song of Solomon, and Ecclesiastes. He then provides an exegetical and detailed commentary on the story of Job. Included is a table of contents and outline of the book of Job.

KENNETH BOA

D A CARSON

C P CAREY

Logos.com: This is a massive study on the book of Job, including exegetical and critical notes, a translation, maps, and illustrations. Bible scholar and pastor Carey also includes dissertations, an analytical paraphrase, and various readings of the Hebrew text. Featuring over 500 pages, this study will aid the general reader as well as the scholar for a comprehensive overview and examination of this key book of the Old Testament. Carey was a pastor in England in the nineteenth century. He was born in 1819. Educated at Elizabeth College in Oxford, he later became a curate of the Bishop of Windsor and then a pastor of St. John’s in Guernsey. He died in 1858.

T K CHEYNE

Logos.com: Bible scholar Cheyne interprets the book of Job, as well as Ecclesiastes in this study. In the introduction, he addresses the question of how the Old Testament relates to Christianity as a whole, providing valuable context. Not only does he examine each chapter of the book of Job, he goes over various questions and common academic arguments. Readers will find this to be an informative, holistic approach to this important book of the Old Testament.

DAVID COLBURN

J NOBLE COLEMAN

Logos.com: This is a holistic translation of the book of Job, including notes both critical and exegetical. Bible scholar J. N. Coleman includes many cross-references and indexes guaranteed to aid the reader with historical context and general comprehension. He spent years researching and comparing various translations and scholars and ancient literary traditions. The text is embedded with helpful and insightful commentary and interpretation.

F C COOK

MARK COPELAND

HENRY COWLES

Representative chapter links below

SAMUEL COX

Logos.com: Taking over fourteen years to compose, A Commentary on the Book of Job provides a highly readable exposition of this book of the Old Testament. Bible scholar and pastor Samuel Cox wrote this commentary in hopes that it would aid the general reader not just now and then, but with every inquiry into the book of Job. He presents a holistic introduction to the book, covering such topics as literary style, historical context, and historical reception. Cox brings his reader into the academic conversation surrounding this book, making practical application throughout.

BOB DEFFINBAUGH

JOHN DICKSON

H L ELLISON

From Tragedy to Triumph: Studies in the Book of Job - The Paternoster Press

ALFRED BOWEN EVANS

Spurgeon: "Discourses from fourteen single verses from different parts of the patient patriarch’s history. They are quite out of the run of Church of England preaching, and are full of thought and originality. They would have been all the better for a little gospel, for even if his text does not look that way, we do expect a Christian minister to have something to say about his Master."

Logos.com: These fourteen lectures on the life of Job were originally presented over the course of ten years in various churches and were collected in book form in 1856. Minister Alfred Evans brings the story of Job to life, drawing out application and careful exposition from this familiar book of the Old Testament for modern readers. Evans believes that Job was not merely a man of great suffering and great faith—he is a character with whom all of humanity can relate. He says, “Job is the brother of all the afflicted, and a son of God in all his afflictions.” This series of lectures will encourage and enlighten all who read them.

GEORG H EWALD

Logos.com: German Bible scholar Georg Ewald turns his attention to the book of Job in this commentary. He systematically goes over each section of Job as a drama, highlighting the contentions and resolutions throughout. In the introduction, Ewald gives context to the format, content, and style of the book as poem. He also examines the date and history of Job as well. Written in an academic yet readable style, this commentary will help all who seek to understand the complexities of this book of the Old Testament.

DON FORTNER

JOHN FRY

Spurgeon: "Written in a devout, inquiring spirit, with due respect to learned writers, but not with a slavish following of their fancies. Fry’s work is somewhat of the same character as Good’s. We greatly esteem this exposition for its own sake, and also for the evangelical tone which pervades it."

Logos.com: John Fry, biblical scholar, believes that Job was a real person and that events described in the book of Job actually occurred. Fry discusses the authenticity, authorship, and historical context, before providing a commentary on the dialogues, theology, relationships, and questions of suffering presented in this book of the Old Testament.

GOSPEL COALITION

JAMES HASTINGS
GREAT TEXTS OF THE BIBLE

F. B. HOLE

DAVID HOLWICK

Click Index for OT Sermon Series - Then Click Job for sermons on following

  • Job 1-2 Bad Things and Good People
  • Job 1:1-11 Do You Fear God for Nothing?
  • Job 1:13-22 Crawling Out of the Loss Hole
  • Job 3:11-26 Choosing Death
  • Job 3:20-26 Better Off Dead
  • Job 8:1-9 When Friends Fail
  • Job 14:13-17 There's Always Hope
  • Job 25:4-6 Worm Theology
  • Job 28:1-13 Digging Deeper (for Wisdom)
  • Job 31:1-13 If…
  • Job 32:1-2 Wisdom of Youth
  • Job 38:1-14 Out of the Whirlwind

H A IRONSIDE

JOHN ANGELL JAMES

J HAMPTON KEATHLEY III

KEIL AND DELITZSCH

WILLIAM KELLY

Logos.com: In Notes on the Book of Job, William Kelly focuses on the character of God as presented in the story of Job—how to reconcile His righteousness with the suffering of the godly? How do we make sense of evil and still trust God? These are vital questions, and Kelly provides a commentary that seeks to answer them in spite of the difficulties they present. Following the clear outline in the book of Job, Kelly goes over each section in great detail, giving the reader a clear view on the context and comfort that this book of the Old Testament can give.

TIMOTHY J KELLER

JOHN KITTO

Spurgeon: "Exceedingly instructive. Most charming reading."

SAMUEL LEE

Logos.com: Although categorized as a translation, scholar Samuel Lee’s work, The Book of Job contains so much more. Lee includes contextual background on the character of Job, history, times, as well as the origin of the writing itself. He also includes a commentary and cross-references throughout the translation, providing invaluable insight and information on this all-important book of the Old Testament. And with over 500 pages, the reader will receive a complete survey of the book of Job.

DAVID LEGGE

JOHN MACARTHUR

C. H. MACKINTOSH

BILL MCRAE

J VERNON MCGEE

Thru the Bible Commentary - Job

MONERGISM

G CAMPBELL MORGAN

A S PEAKE

Logos.com: Peake believes that the character and love of God are enough to comfort us in times of trouble, even though suffering will always be mysterious and painful, and he uses the story of Job to illustrate this point.

ROBERT RAYBURN

AREND REMMERS

KIM RIDDLEBARGER

HENRI ROSSIER

JOHNNY SANDERS

KEITH SIMONS

JAMES SMITH

JOHN STEVENSON

LEHMAN STRAUSS

JOSEPH TSON

W. H. WESTCOTT

WYCLIFFE BIBLE COMMENTARY

THOMAS WEMYSS

Logos.com: In this volume, scholar Wemyss focuses exclusively on the person of Job, using the time and history as a lens. Wemyss dismisses popular notions of Job, and goes straight to the text itself as well as historical documentation of patriarchal individuals. He goes into great detail on religion, art, science, and social norms of the time to give the reader a full context and idea of the probable character of Job. Wemyss also includes a new translation of the text.

SERMONS ON JOB
Chapter
Verse by Verse

DEVOTIONALS

PASTOR LIFE

GREGG ALLEN

F W GRANT

J. G. BELLET

J. B STONEY

WILLIAM PLUMER

MELVIN TINKER

MARK DEVER

JOHN MACARTHUR

JAMES HASTINGS- GREAT TEXTS

STUART OLYOTT

PRECEPTAUSTIN

Job 1:11 - The family of John Paton a missionary to the New Hebrides was threatened one night by natives (and they were cannibals!) who were determined to kill them. The Patons went to their Protector pleading in prayer and miraculously survived the night. When day broke they were surprised to see that the natives had withdrawn. A year later when Paton ask the now friendly chief why they did not eat him and his family that night, the chief explained that it was because of the band of armed men that surrounded the house! God's angelic host (cp Heb 1:14 Ps 91:11 and Ps 34:7 where Angel of the Lord is probably pre-incarnate Christ).

Satan's "Theology" -

a) IF Job is blessed by God, THEN he will be faithful.

OR

b) IF job is not blessed by God, THEN he will be unfaithful.

In essence, Satan accused God of bribing His followers!

Friend's "Theology" -

a) IF Job is faithful, THEN he will be blessed.

OR

b) IF Job is unfaithful, THEN he will be punished.

BRIAN BILL

BRIAN BILL

DAVID LEGGE

EXPLORE THE BIBLE

ALAN CARR

BOB FROMM

PRECEPTAUSTIN

Job 1:20

Remember that the real test of our worship is not how well we sing or how closely we listen on Sunday morning. The test is how we react when the world hits on Monday morning and begins to deprive our lives of the peace, security, and joy God gives to His own. When that happens we need to remember Job's example and that it is just as possible for us to worship on Monday as it is on Sunday!

HUDSON TAYLOR

BIBLE.ORG

KIM RIDDLEBARGER

ALAN CARR

DON ROBINSON

PRECEPTAUSTIN

Job 2:10 Job's response reinforces a principle of spiritual warfare that we talked about earlier. Satan has only the influence in our lives that we allow him to have. He cannot force us to do anything. When we resist him, he must leave (James 4:7).

Job 2:13 Don't miss the powerful principle in this passage - Job’s friends’ silence could seem cold and heartless. After all, aren’t friends supposed to speak words of comfort? Well, not always. Sometimes there really isn’t anything that can be said. Sometimes the best thing we can do is to sit silently with those who suffer and allow ourselves to enter into their pain. Sometimes our silent presence is our best and most caring ministry.

OCTAVIUS WINSLOW

BOB FROMM

ALAN CARR

EXPLORE THE BIBLE

ALAN CARR

MELVIN TINKER

KIM RIDDLEBARGER

ANNIE JOHNSON FLINT

JOHN ANGELL JAMES

THOMAS WATSON

  • God being a Father, if He hide His face from His child, it is in love. Desertion is sad in itself, a short hell (Job 6:9). When the light is withdrawn, dew falls. Yet we may see a rainbow in the cloud, the love of a Father in all this.

W A CRISWELL

MELVIN TINKER

WIL POUNDS

THOMAS BROOKS

JAMES HASTINGS-GREAT TEXTS

J C RYLE

JOHN MACARTHUR

DON ROBINSON

MARY KIMBROUGH

JAMES HASTINGS-GREAT TEXTS

ALAN CARR

J C RYLE

JAMES SMITH

DON ROBINSON

ALAN CARR

JAMES HASTINGS-GREAT TEXTS

W A CRISWELL

THOMAS WATSON

RAY PRITCHARD

KIM RIDDLEBARGER

EXPLORE THE BIBLE

JOHN NEWTON

ON SITE

JAMES HASTINGS-GREAT TEXTS

F W ROBERTSON

JOHN NEWTON

JOHN GILL

ALAN CARR

W A CRISWELL

DAVID C DEUEL

J H JOWETT

KIM RIDDLEBARGER

GRACEGEMS

EXPLORE THE BIBLE

JAMES HASTINGS-GREAT TEXTS

ALEXANDER WHYTE

DAVID LEGGE

J. C. PHILPOT

ON SITE

RAY PRITCHARD

BOB FROMM

DON FORTNER

A W PINK

JOHN MACDUFF

GEORGE MACDONALD

DAVID LEGGE

J C PHILPOT

J C PHILPOT

KIM RIDDLEBARGER

J H JOWETT

MELVIN TINKER

THOMAS BOSTON

DEVOTIONAL

KIM RIDDLEBARGER

MELVIN TINKER

JAMES HASTINGS-GREAT TEXTS

KIM RIDDLEBARGER

WILLIAM BACON STEVENS

J H JOWETT

JAMES HASTINGS-GREAT TEXTS

C H SPURGEON

We must not trust our heart at any time; even when it speaks most fair, we must call it liar; and when it pretends to the most good, still we must remember its nature, for it is evil, and that continually.

When a man is saved by divine grace, he is not wholly cleansed from the corruption of his heart. When we believe in Jesus Christ all our sins are pardoned; yet the power of sin, albeit that it is weakened and kept under by the dominion of the new-born nature which God doth infuse into our souls, doth not cease, but still tarrieth in us, and will do so to our dying day.

KIM RIDDLEBARGER

MELVIN TINKER

CHARLES PRICE

ALAN CARR

OSWALD CHAMBERS

ARTHUR PINK

JAMES HASTINGS-GREAT TEXTS

STEVE ZEISLER

W A CRISWELL

See Also:

J R MILLER

1. Afflictions

2. Afflictions Sanctified

3. An Appeal to God

4. Confession and Restoration

G CAMPBELL MORGAN
The Book of Job in "The Analyzed Bible"
Job - The Problem of Pain

Rosscup - This is a good synthesis which helps to trace the developing thought of the book of Job. A detailed outline is given. (Commentaries For Biblical Expositors)

Another Source of the same material with active links and pop ups…

ROBERT MORGAN
The Donelson Fellowship
Messages Include Many Illustrations

HENRY MORRIS
Study Notes on Job
Defender's Study Bible
Brief but Excellent Notes

Listen to Dr Henry Morris' message on The Remarkable Record of Job

The Remarkable Record of Job- Henry M. Morris (reviews) - This book gives special emphasis to the scientific truths revealed in the book of Job.

 

ORD MORROW
The Puzzles of Job
Back to the Bible
Note: These are more general
and are not Verse by Verse

ROBERT NEIGHBOUR
Living Water Commentary

NET BIBLE NOTES
Book of Job

JAMES NISBET
Church Pulpit Commentary
Book of Job

OUR DAILY BREAD
Devotional Illustrations
Book of Job
RBC Ministries
Updated December 28, 2015

See also - More Devotionals on Job - Our Daily Bread

JOSEPH PARKER
The People's Bible
Commentary on Job

Index

 

HANDFULS OF PURPOSE
FOR ALL GLEANERS

PASTOR LIFE
Sermons on Job

Will A Man Serve God For Nothing? Job Faithfulness; Suffering; Dedication; Faith Ron Dunn
Rebuilding After Tragedy Job Recovery; New Start; Renewal; Second Chance Paul E. Brown
Thanksgiving Living Job Salvation; Gratitude; Thanksgiving; Praise; God, Greatness of Steve Wagers
The Giant of Suffering Job 1:1-22 Suffering Denis Lyle
Tears are a Language God Understands Job 16:20 Tears; Sorrow; Love, God's Sammy Burgess
My Redeemer Lives Job 19:21-27 Lord's Supper; Resurrection James William Mercer
Pure Gold Job 23:10 Trials; Christian Growth; Victory Alan Stewart
When You Can't Find God Job 23:1-10 God, Presence of Jerry N. Watts
Life in the Rearview Mirror Job 29 Time; Past; Remembrance Alan Stewart
Some Things Never Change Job 33:12-30 Change; Weariness; Suffering; Salvation; Peace, Jesus, Unchanging J. Mike Minnix

JOHN PIPER
Sermons on Job
Desiringgod.org

Desiring God Fall, 2008 Conference - Recommended (Transcripts listed below but I also recommend listening to the Audio)

MATTHEW POOLE
Commentary on Job
Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

PREACHER'S HOMILETICAL COMMENTARY
The Book of Job
Exposition, Homiletics and Illustrations

343 Page Resource Worth Checking
Introduction

PULPIT COMMENTARY
Exposition of the Book of Job
Scroll Down Page for Homilies

ROBERT RAYBURN
Sermons on the
Book of Job

REFORMATION STUDY BIBLE
Notes On
Book of Job

Table of Contents - Reformation Study Bible - Bible Gateway

SERMON BIBLE COMMENTARY
Book of Job

CHARLES SIMEON
Sermons on the Book of Job
Horae Homileticae
Recommended

CHUCK SMITH
Sermon Notes on Job

Through the Bible (C2000 Series)

C. H. SPURGEON
Sermons
All of Spurgeon's Sermons on Job
Including His Sermon Notes

C H SPURGEON
Devotionals on Job
Morning and Evening
Faith's Checkbook

C H SPURGEON
Expositions on Job

RAY STEDMAN
Let God Be God - Studies in Job
Peninsula Bible Church

Click here for Mp3 and Pdf formats

 

Some Duplication of Links above

JOE TEMPLE
Sermons in Job

DEREK THOMAS
Studies in Job

GEOFF THOMAS
Sermons on Job

 

THIRD MILLENNIUM
Study Notes on Job

Job 1

Job 2

Job 3

Job 4

Job 5

Job 6

Job 7

Job 8

Job 9

Job 10

Job 11

Job 12

Job 13

Job 14

Job 15

Job 16

Job 17

Job 18

Job 19

Job 20

Job 21

Job 22

Job 23

Job 24

Job 25

Job 26

Job 27

Job 28

Job 29

Job 30

Job 31

Job 32

Job 33

Job 34

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Job 41

Job 42

TODAY IN THE WORD
Devotionals on the Book of Job
Moody Bible Institute

JOHN TRAPP
Book of Job

ROBERT WATSON
Book of Job
Exposition of the Bible Commentary Series
Editor: Marcus Dods

OTTO ZOCKLER
Book of Job
Lange's Commentary Series

Spurgeon's review: "Contains a large collection of available material and if within a minister's means, should be a foundation book in his library. We are far from endorsing all Zockler's remarks, but the volume is an important one." (Commenting and commentaries)

Book

chapter
1

DISCLAIMER: Before you "go to the commentaries" go to the Scriptures and study them inductively (Click 3 part overview of how to do Inductive Bible Study) in dependence on your Teacher, the Holy Spirit, Who Jesus promised would guide us into all the truth (John 16:13). Remember that Scripture is always the best commentary on Scripture. Any commentary, even those by the most conservative and orthodox teacher/preachers cannot help but have at least some bias of the expositor based upon his training and experience. Therefore the inclusion of specific links does not indicate that we agree with every comment. We have made a sincere effort to select only the most conservative, "bibliocentric" commentaries. Should you discover some commentary or sermon you feel may not be orthodox, please email your concern. I have removed several links in response to concerns by discerning readers. I recommend that your priority be a steady intake of solid Biblical food so that with practice you will have your spiritual senses trained to discern good from evil (Heb 5:14-note).