Hebrews 12:27-29

 

 

Home
Site Index
Inductive Bible Study
Greek Word Studies
Commentaries by Verse
Area Precept Classes
Reference Search
Bible Dictionaries
Bible Maps
Bible Commentaries
Discipline Yourself
Christian Biography
Western Wall
Bible Prophecy

Search chap/verse
Search word: Retrieve verses, illustrations, etc

 


 

INDEX
PREVIOUS
NEXT

COLLECTIONS
Commentaries, Word Studies, Devotionals, Sermons, Illustrations
Old and New Testament.

   
  

   

 

Search Every word on Preceptaustin
 
    Help

 

Hebrews 12:27 This expression, "Yet once more," denotes the removing of those things which can be shaken, as of created things, so that those things which cannot be shaken may remain.  (NASB: Lockman)

Greek: to de, Eti hapax deloi (3SPAI) [ten] ton saleuomenon (PPPNPG) metathesin os pepoiemenon, (RPPNPG) ina meine (3SAAS) ta me saleuomena. (PPPNPN)
Amplified:  Now this expression, Yet once more, indicates the final removal and transformation of all [that can be] shaken—that is, of that which has been created—in order that what cannot be shaken may remain and continue. 
(Amplified Bible - Lockman)
NLT:   This means that the things on earth will be shaken, so that only eternal things will be left. (NLT - Tyndale House)
Wuest: And this word, Yet once more, makes evident the transferring to a new basis the things that are shaken as of things made, in order that the things that are not shaken might remain [the present universe under the curse of sin changed to the perfect universe of the eternal conditions]. (
Eerdmans
Young's Literal:   and this -- 'Yet once' -- doth make evident the removal of the things shaken, as of things having been made, that the things not shaken may remain;

References

Max Alderman
Henry Alford
Albert Barnes
Brian Bell
Johann Bengel
Jim Bomkamp
John Calvin
Adam Clarke
Steven Cole
Steven Cole

Steven Cole

Steven Cole

Steven Cole

Steven Cole

Steven Cole
Thomas Constable
W A Criswell
Ron Daniel
Bob Deffinbaugh
Bob Deffinbaugh

Bob Deffinbaugh
Marcus Dods
J Ligon Duncan
J Ligon Duncan
J Ligon Duncan
Thomas Edwards
Thomas Edwards
Explore the Bible
F W Farrar
Dan Fortner
Dan Fortner
William Gouge
Scott Grant
Scott Grant

Scott Grant

Dave Guzik
Matthew Henry
F B Hole
Jamieson, F, B
S Lewis Johnson
S Lewis Johnson

S Lewis Johnson

S Lewis Johnson
William Kelly
Lange's Commentary
John MacArthur
John MacArthur

John MacArthur

John MacArthur
John MacArthur
John MacArthur
John MacArthur

John MacArthur

John MacArthur
John MacArthur

John MacArthur
Ian Mackervoy
Alexander Maclaren
Alexander Maclaren
Alexander Maclaren
Alexander Maclaren

Alexander Maclaren
Alexander Maclaren
Alexander Maclaren
Alexander Maclaren
Alexander Maclaren

Alexander Maclaren
J Vernon McGee

F B Meyer
F B Meyer
F B Meyer

F B Meyer

F B Meyer
F B Meyer
Andrew Murray
Net Bible Notes
Phil Newton
Phil Newton

Phil Newton
Phil Newton
Phil Newton
Our Daily Bread
Joseph Parker
Joseph Parker
Joseph Parker

Joseph Parker
A W Pink
A W Pink

A W Pink

A W Pink

A W Pink
A W Pink
A W Pink
A W Pink

A W Pink

A W Pink

A W Pink
A W Pink

A W Pink
A W Pink

A W Pink

A W Pink

A W Pink
A W Pink

A W Pink
A W Pink

A W Pink

A W Pink

A W Pink
John Piper
John Piper

John Piper

John Piper
Pulpit Commentary
Pulpit Commentary
Pulpit Commentary
A T Robertson
Gil Rugh

Gil Rugh
Gil Rugh
Rob Salvato
Rob Salvato

Rob Salvato

Rob Salvato
Charles Simeon
Charles Simeon
Charles Simeon
Charles Simeon
Charles Simeon
Charles Simeon
Charles Simeon
Charles Simeon
Barry Smith
Chuck Smith
Chuck Smith
Chuck Smith
Chuck Smith
Speaker's Commentary
C H Spurgeon
C H Spurgeon
C H Spurgeon

C H Spurgeon
C H Spurgeon
C H Spurgeon
C H Spurgeon

C H Spurgeon

C H Spurgeon
C H Spurgeon
C H Spurgeon

C H Spurgeon

C H Spurgeon
C H Spurgeon
C H Spurgeon

C H Spurgeon
C H Spurgeon
C H Spurgeon
C H Spurgeon

Ray Stedman
Ray Stedman

Ray Stedman
Ray Stedman
Ray Stedman

Ray Stedman
Ray Stedman

Ray Stedman

Today in the Word
Marvin Vincent
Drew Worthen
Drew Worthen
Precept Ministries

Hebrews 12 Goto page 310
Hebrews 12 New Testament for English Readers
Hebrews 12 Commentary
Hebrews12:1-3,Hebrews12:4-11; Hebrews12:12-17; Hebrews12:18 -29
Hebrews 12 Critical English Testament
Hebrews 12 Sermon Notes
Hebrews 12 Commentary
Hebrews 12 Commentary
Hebrews 12:1-3 Faith to Run the Christian Marathon

Hebrews 12:4-6 God's Loving Discipline

Hebrews 12:7-11 Responding to God's Discipline

Hebrews 12:12-14 Perseverance, Peace, and Purity

Hebrews 12:15-17 Finishing the Race Together

Hebrews 12:18-24 Are You Living in Sinai or Zion?

Hebrews 12:25-29 Great Privileges, Great God, Great Responsibilities

Hebrews 12 Commentary
Hebrews 12:1, 12:1-2, 12:1-3, 12:16-17, 12:18, 12:25, 12:29, 12:5-11
Hebrews 12 Sermons
Hebrews 12:1-3 Losing Weight

Hebrews 12:4-17 The Problem of Pain

Hebrews 12:18-29 An Unshakable Kingdom
Hebrews 12 Commentary - Expositor's Greek Testament
Hebrews 12:1-11 A Call to Spiritual Discipline
Hebrews 12:12-17 A Call to Holiness
Hebrews 12:18-29 The Glories and Responsibilities of Zion
Hebrews 12:1-17 Conflict (Expositor's Bible Commentary)
Hebrews 12:18-29 Mount Zion (Expositor's Bible Commentary)
Hebrews 12:1-29 Persevere amid Difficulty
Hebrews 12 Commentary - Cambridge Commentary - 1891
Hebrews 12:1-4, 12:1-2, 12:2, 12:3-4, 12:3-4, 12:5-11, 12:5-11, 12:12-17
Hebrews 12:18-24, 12:18-24, 12:24-25, 12:25-29, 12:26-27
Hebrews 9-13 Commentary
Hebrews 12:1-3  Race for Heroes
Hebrews 12:4-13 The Surprise in Suffering
Hebrews 12:14-29 The Voice of Grace
Hebrews 12 Commentary
Hebrews 12 Commentary
Hebrews Commentary Notes
Hebrews 12 Commentary2

Hebrews 12:1-3 The Christian Race

Hebrews 12:4-11 The Discipline of Life

Hebrews 12:12-17 The Horrors of the Careless Professor

Hebrews 12:18-24 Mount Sinai and Mount Zion
Hebrews 7-13 Commentary
Hebrews 12 Commentary
Hebrews 12:1 Dealing with Habitual Sins
Hebrews 12:1-4 Run for Your Life

Hebrews 12:1-3 The Race of Faith

Hebrews 12:1-4 Running the Race That Is Set Before Us

Hebrews 12:4-11 God’s Faithful Discipline

Hebrews 12:5-11 The Discipline of God
Hebrews 12:5-11 The Discipline of God

Hebrews 12:5-11 God's Loving Discipline 1

Hebrews 12:5-11 God's Loving Discipline 2
Hebrews 12:12-17 Falling Short of the Grace of God
Hebrews 12:18-29 Mount Sinai or Mount Zion?

Hebrews Commentary: How can I get to Heaven? Easy English
Hebrews 12:1, 2 The Cloud of Witnesses and Their Leader
Hebrews 12:1 The Christian Life a Race

Hebrews 12:1 Weights and Sins
Hebrews 12:2 The Perfecter of Faith
Hebrews 12:4 Resisting Unto Blood
Hebrews 12:10 A Father's Discipline
Hebrews 12:17 Esau's Vain Tears
Hebrews 12:22, 23 With Whom Faith Lives
Hebrews 12:23 Faith's Access to the Judge, and His Attendants
Hebrews 12:24 The Messenger of the Covenant and its Seat
Hebrews Mp3's
Hebrews 12:1-2: Stripping for the Race

Hebrews 12:6: Chastisement

Hebrews 12:13-14: The Ideal Life

Hebrews 12:22-24: Sinai and Zion

Hebrews 12:27: Things that Cannot be Shaken

Hebrews 12:29: God a Consuming Fire
Hebrews 12 Commentary (Holiest of All)
Hebrews 12 Notes
Hebrews 12:1-3  Consider Christ

Hebrews 12:4-11  The Discipline of Sonship

Hebrews 12:12-17  Why Tears Are Not Enough

Hebrews 12:18-24  Zion, Not Sinai

Hebrews 12:25-29  A Kingdom That Cannot Be Shaken 

Hebrews Devotionals
Hebrews 12:1 The Euperistatos

Hebrews 12:3 Sinners Against Themselves

Hebrews 12:16 The Price of Birthrights

Hebrews 12:17 Forfeited Blessings

Hebrews 12:1 The Demands of Faith.

Hebrews 12:2 The Object of Faith. .

Hebrews 12:3, 4 A Call to Steadfastness.

Hebrews 12:5 Divine Chastisement.

Hebrews 12:5 Divine Chastisement.

Hebrews 12:6 Divine Chastisement.

Hebrews 12:7, 8 Divine Chastisement.

Hebrews 12:9 Divine Chastisement.

Hebrews 12:10 Divine Chastisement.

Hebrews 12:11 Divine Chastisement.

Hebrews 12:12, 13 A Call to Steadfastness.

Hebrews 12:14 A Call to Diligence.

Hebrews 12:15 A Call to Examination.

Hebrews 12:16, 17 A Warning against Apostasy.

Hebrews 12:18, 19 The Inferiority of Judaism.

Hebrews 12:20, 21 The Inferiority of Judaism.

Hebrews 12:22-24 The Superiority of Christianity.

Hebrews 12:22-24 The Superiority of Christianity.

Hebrews 12:25, 26 The Call to Hear.

Hebrews 12:26, 27 The Passing of Judaism.

Hebrews 12:27 The Establishing of Christianity.

Hebrews 12:28 The Kingdom of Christ.

Hebrews 12:28, 29 he Final Warning

Hebrews 11:39-12:2 Running with the witnesses

Hebrews 12:3-11 The painful discipline of our heavenly Father

Hebrews 12:12-17 Fail not to obtain the grace of God

Hebrews 12:18-29 You have come to Mount Zion
Hebrews 12 Exposition
Hebrews 12 Homiletics
Hebrews 12 Homilies

Hebrews 12  Greek Word Studies
Hebrews 12:1-17 Disciplines & Direction Of Life
Hebrews 12:18-24 Mt. Sinai and Mt. Zion, Part 1
Hebrews 12:25-29 Mt. Sinai And Mt. Zion, Part 2
Hebrews12-1 The Race Set Before Us
Hebrews 12-5 Spiritual Training
Hebrews 12-12 The Glory Of His Grace
Hebrews 12-14 Watch Out For Bitterness
Hebrews 12:1, 2 Christ's Persevering Diligence
Hebrews 12:3 Christ's Patience Under Suffering
Hebrews 12:4-13 Afflictions the Fruit of God's Love

Hebrews 12:14 The Necessity of Holiness
Hebrews 12:15-17 The Danger of Despising or Dishonoring the Gospel
Hebrews 12:18-25 The Transcendent Excellence

Hebrews 12:22, 24 Abel's Sacrifice and Christ's Compared
Hebrews 12:28, 29 God to Be Served With Reverential Fear
Letter to Hebrews - 329 page commentary
Hebrews 12:1 The Christian Race

Hebrews 12:1-3 Looking Unto Jesus

Hebrews 12:2 Our Proper Attitude toward Suffering

Hebrews 12:25 The Unshakeables
Hebrews 12 Commentary
Hebrews 12:1,2 The Rule of the Race -
Hebrews 12:2 The Shameful Sufferer
Hebrews 12:3 A Honeycomb -
Hebrews 12:3 Our Lord's Historic Endurance -
Hebrews 12:5 Chastisement
Hebrews 12:11 Chastisement - Now and Afterwards -
Hebrews 12:13 Lame Sheep

Hebrews 12:13 Lame Sheep - Sermon Notes
Hebrews 12:14 Holiness Demanded
Hebrews 12:14,15 The Winnowing Fan -
Hebrews 12:22-24 The General Convocation Around Mount Zion -
Hebrews 12:23 The Church of the Firstborn -
Hebrews 12:24 The Voice of the Blood of Christ
Hebrews 12:24-25 The Blood of Sprinkling--Part 1
Hebrews 12:24-25 The Blood of Sprinkling--Part 2
Hebrews 12:25 God's Word Not to be Refused
Hebrews 12:25 Hear! Hear! - Sermon Notes
Hebrews 12:27 A Lesson from the Great Panic -
Hebrews 12:28,29 Acceptable Service -
Hebrews 12:1-29 Faith Trained and Tested

Hebrews 12:1-3 The Race of Life
Hebrews 12:4-13 How God Trains Us
Hebrews 12:14-17 The Dangers to Watch For
Hebrews 12:18-24 The Blessings Now Possible
Hebrews 12:25-29 The Fifth and Final Warning
Hebrews 11:8 - 12:2 How Faith Works
Hebrews 12:3-29 Never Give Up
Hebrews 12:18-29; 12:14-29

Hebrews 12 Greek Word Studies
Hebrews 12:1-2Heb 12:3-4Heb 12:5-13Heb 12:14 -
Hebrews 12:15-17Hebrews 12:18-24 Hebrews 12:25-29 -

Download lesson one of
Part 1;  Part2

AND THIS [EXPRESSION], "YET ONCE MORE," DENOTES THE REMOVING OF THOSE THINGS WHICH CAN BE SHAKEN AS OF CREATED THINGS IN ORDER THAT THOSE THINGS WHICH CANNOT BE SHAKEN MAY REMAIN: to de eti hapax deloi (3SPAI) (ten) ton saleuomenon (PPPNPG) metathesin os pepoiemenon (RPPNPG) hina meine (3SAAS) ta me saleuomena (PPPNPN): (Psalms 102:26,27; Ezekiel 21:27; Matthew 24:35; 2Peter 3:10,11; Revelation 11:15; 21:1)

Yet once more - Isaiah echoes this warning

Therefore I shall make the heavens tremble, and the earth will be shaken from its place at the fury of the LORD of hosts in the day of His burning anger. (Isaiah 13:13).

It is this greater shaking from which there is no escape. That shaking will culminate in the great judgments described in Daniel and Revelation. The earth and heaven will flee away and be replaced by the new heavens and the new earth.

Isa 65:17 For behold, I create new heavens and a new earth; and the former things shall not be remembered or come to mind.

Isa 66:22 "For just as the new heavens and the new earth Which I make will endure before Me," declares the LORD, "So your offspring and your name will endure. (Comment: For those who think God is finished with Israel, this verse creates a huge problem. In fact God promises that  like the eternal new heavens and new earth, Israel will endure forever!)

2 Peter 3:13 (see note) But according to His promise we are looking for new heavens and a new earth, in which righteousness dwells.

Revelation 21:1 (see note) And I saw a new heaven and a new earth; for the first heaven and the first earth passed away, and there is no longer any sea.

Vincent comments that...

Attention is called to this phrase (yet once more) as specially significant, because it indicates that the shaking prophesied by Haggai is to be final. It is to precede the new heaven and the new earth.

This cataclysmic event will explode the myth that what we can see and touch and handle is real and that unseen things are unreal. When God ends the sifting and shaking process, only that which is real will remain. Those who were occupied with the tangible, visible ritualism of Judaism were clinging to things that could and would be shaken.

Denotes (1213) (deloo from delos = manifest, evident) means to make plain by words and thus to declare. To make manifest to the mind. Deloo is used of indications which lead the mind to conclusions about the origin or character of things. It means to make some matter known that was unknown or not communicated previously. It means to show clearly, to signify, to make manifest, visible, clear, or plain and to make known.  When spoken of things past it means to tell, relate or impart information (as in 1Cor 1:11; Colossians 1:18 [note]). Although deloo is used most often in reference to declarations through articulate language, it is also used often (as in the present verse) of any kind of indirect communication.

When spoken of things future or hidden, deloo means to reveal, show or bring to light.

Deloo is used 28 times in the Septuagint (LXX) (Exod. 6:3; 33:12; Deut. 33:10; Jos. 4:7; 1 Sam. 3:21; 1 Ki. 8:36; 2Chr. 6:27; Est. 2:22; Ps. 25:14; 51:6; 147:20; Isa. 42:9; Jer. 16:21; Dan. 2:5f, 9, 11, 16, 23ff, 28ff, 47; 4:18; 7:16). Here are some uses in the  Septuagint (LXX)

Exodus 6:3 and I appeared to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, as God Almighty, but by My name, LORD, I did not make Myself known (deloo) to them.

Exodus 33:12 Then Moses said to the LORD, "See, Thou dost say to me, 'Bring up this people!' But Thou Thyself hast not let me know (deloo) whom Thou wilt send with me. Moreover, Thou hast said, 'I have known you by name, and you have also found favor in My sight.'

Esther 2:22 But the plot became known (deloo) to Mordecai, and he told Queen Esther, and Esther informed the king in Mordecai's name.

Psalm 25:14 The secret of the LORD is for those who fear Him, And He will make them know (deloo) His covenant.

Psalm 51:6 Behold, Thou dost desire truth in the innermost being, And in the hidden part Thou wilt make me know (deloo) wisdom.

Psalm 147:20 He has not dealt thus with any nation and as for His ordinances, they have not known (deloo) them. Praise the LORD!

Isaiah 42:9 "Behold, the former things have come to pass, Now I declare new things; Before they spring forth I proclaim (Lxx = deloo = make them known) them to you."

Daniel 2:25 Then Arioch hurriedly brought Daniel into the king's presence and spoke to him as follows: "I have found a man among the exiles from Judah who can make the interpretation known (deloo) to the king!"

Deloo is used 7 times in the NT...

1 Corinthians 1:11 For I have been informed concerning you, my brethren, by Chloe's people, that there are quarrels among you.

1 Corinthians 3:13 each man's work will become evident; for the day will show it, because it is to be revealed with fire; and the fire itself will test the quality of each man's work.

Colossians 1:8 (note) and he also informed us of your love in the Spirit.

Hebrews 9:8 (note)  The Holy Spirit is signifying this, that the way into the holy place has not yet been disclosed, while the outer tabernacle is still standing,

Hebrews 12:27 (note) And this expression, "Yet once more," denotes the removing of those things which can be shaken, as of created things, in order that those things which cannot be shaken may remain.

1 Peter 1:11 (note) seeking to know what person or time the Spirit of Christ within them was indicating as He predicted the sufferings of Christ and the glories to follow.

2 Peter 1:14 (note) knowing that the laying aside of my earthly dwelling is imminent, as also our Lord Jesus Christ has made clear (of something divinely communicated) to me.

Removing (3331) (metathesis from metatíthemi = transfer from meta  = implying change + tithemi = put) is literally, the act of transferring from one place to another  and so the removal or taking up or away. And so it can describe a transfer from one place to another, as for example the translation of a person to heaven...

By faith Enoch was taken up so that he should not see death; and he was not found because God took him up; for he obtained the witness that before his being taken up he was pleasing to God. (see note Hebrews 11:5).

Hebrews 12:27 uses metathesis with the idea of removal.

Figuratively, metathesis means to transpose or put one thing in the place of another. It can mean a change of things instituted or established, such as a changeover from the Levitical priesthood

For when the priesthood is changed, of necessity there takes place a change of law also. (see note Hebrews 7:12) (Comment: The priesthood after the order of Melchizedek was put in the place of the priesthood after the order of Aaron. The blood of animals could not pay for sin, but the blood of Messiah could. Thus, the New Covenant was substituted for the Old Covenant, Jesus’ blood, the reality, for animal blood, the type. But that could only be done by changing the law governing the priesthood. Thus, if a transfer to a new and different order of priesthood was to be effected, it must be by reason of a transfer to a new basis. The law governing the priesthood as found in the Mosaic economy must be abrogated in favor of another which would provide for an order of priesthood that would function successfully in the very thing in which the Aaronic priesthood failed.- Wuest)

Transliterated it gives us the English word metathesis which is defined as the transposition of a letter of a word.

Vincent comments on the meaning of metathesis in Hebrews 7:12 writing that there it refers to

A change. A transfer to a new basis. Only in Hebrews. See notes Hebrews 11:5; Hebrews 12:27. The inferiority of the Levitical priesthood is inferred from the fact that another priesthood was promised. If perfection was possible at all under the Mosaic economy, it must come through the Levitical priesthood, since that priesthood was, in a sense, the basis of the law. The whole legal system centered in it. The fundamental idea of the law was that of a people united with God. Sin, the obstacle to this ideal union, was dealt with through the priesthood. If the law failed to effect complete fellowship with God, the priesthood was shown to be a failure, and must be abolished; and the change of the priesthood involved the abolition of the entire legal system.

Wuest explains the removing writing that...

It refers to the act of God transferring to a new basis, this present universe which is under the curse of Adam’s sin, that new basis being a new and perfect universe. John speaks of this in the words “I saw a new heaven and a new earth: for the first heaven and the first earth were passed away” Revelation 21:1 (see note). The universe was created by God, but will be made to pass away, and to be substituted by a new universe which will exist forever. Thus, transitory, perishable things must pass away, in order that the eternal things may appear in their abiding value. The writer is pointing out that the passing away of perishable things only emphasizes the eternal. One of these is mentioned in the next verse, an eternal kingdom, the kingdom of God’s rule over the saved of the human race on a new earth all through eternity. The old earth will pass away and a new earth will be made so that the saints might have a fit place of habitation throughout the eternal ages. (Wuest, K. S. Wuest's Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: Eerdmans or Logos)

><> ><> ><>

C H Spurgeon - Morning and evening : Daily readings (June 22 PM) - We have many things in our possession at the present moment which can be shaken, and it ill becomes a Christian man to set much store by them, for there is nothing stable beneath these rolling skies; change is written upon all things. Yet, we have certain “things which cannot be shaken,” and I invite you this evening to think of them, that if the things which can be shaken should all be taken away, you may derive real comfort from the things that cannot be shaken, which will remain. Whatever your losses have been, or may be, you enjoy present salvation. You are standing at the foot of his cross, trusting alone in the merit of Jesus’ precious blood, and no rise or fall of the markets can interfere with your salvation in him; no breaking of banks, no failures and bankruptcies can touch that. Then you are a child of God this evening. God is your Father. No change of circumstances can ever rob you of that. Although by losses brought to poverty, and stripped bare, you can say, “He is my Father still. In my Father’s house are many mansions; therefore will I not be troubled.” You have another permanent blessing, namely, the love of Jesus Christ. He who is God and Man loves you with all the strength of his affectionate nature—nothing can affect that. The fig tree may not blossom, and the flocks may cease from the field, it matters not to the man who can sing, “My Beloved is mine, and I am his.” Our best portion and richest heritage we cannot lose. Whatever troubles come, let us play the man; let us show that we are not such little children as to be cast down by what may happen in this poor fleeting state of time. Our country is Immanuel’s land, our hope is above the sky, and therefore, calm as the summer’s ocean; we will see the wreck of everything earthborn, and yet rejoice in the God of our salvation. (Spurgeon, C. H.).

 

Hebrews 12:28 Therefore, since we receive a kingdom which cannot be shaken, let us show gratitude, by which we may offer to God an acceptable service with reverence and awe (NASB: Lockman)

Greek: Dio basileian asaleuton paralambanontes (PAPMPN) echomen (1PPAS) charin, di' es latreuomen (1PPAS) euarestos to theo meta eulabeias kai deous;
Amplified:  Let us therefore, receiving a kingdom that is firm and stable and cannot be shaken, offer to God pleasing service and acceptable worship, with modesty and pious care and godly fear and awe (Amplified Bible - Lockman)
NLT:   Since we are receiving a kingdom that cannot be destroyed, let us be thankful and please God by worshiping him with holy fear and awe. (NLT - Tyndale House)
Wuest: Wherefore, receiving a kingdom which cannot be shaken, let us be having grace, by means of which we might be serving God, well pleasing to Him, doing this with pious care and fear (
Eerdmans
Young's Literal:   wherefore, a kingdom that cannot be shaken receiving, may we have grace, through which we may serve God well-pleasingly, with reverence and religious fear;

THEREFORE SINCE WE RECEIVE A KINGDOM WHICH CANNOT BE SHAKEN LET US  SHOW GRATITUDE BY WHICH WE MAY OFFER TO GOD AN ACCEPTABLE SERVICE WITH REVERENCE) AND AWE: Dio basileian asaleuton paralambanontes (PAPMPN) echomen (1PPAS) charin, di' es latreuomen (1PPAS) euarestos to theo meta eulabeias kai deous:  (Isa 9:7; Da 2:44; 7:14,27; Mt 25:34; Lk 1:33; 17:20,21; 1Pe 1:4,5; Rev 1:6; 5:10) (we may -Ps 19:14; Isa 56:7; Ro 12:1,2; Eph 1:6; 5:10; Php 4:18; 1Pe 2:5,20) (reverence and awe - Heb 4:16; 5:7; 10:19,22; Lev 10:3; Ps 2:11; 89:7; Pr 28:24; Ro 11:20; 1Pe 1:17; Rev 15:4)

Therefore since we receive  - for this cause ~ because of the truth that follows. This truth should give us a motivation and should inspire worshipful service out of a heart filled with thanksgiving at the truth that what we have in Christ can never be moved or shaken no matter what we might be experiencing in the temporal by and by. We today like the original Jewish readers of this letter have a Solid Rock, Who was also a merciful and faithful High Priest, seated forever as our Advocate at the right hand of God.

NKJV is a somewhat more literal rendering than NAS...

Therefore, since we are receiving a kingdom which cannot be shaken, let us have grace (instead of "let us show gratitude"), by which we may serve God acceptably with reverence and godly fear.

Note let us have is in the present tense so it could be paraphrased let us have a lifestyle of grace, one lived continually in His transforming power. Grace is the only way a believer can offer an "acceptable" service to a holy God (deeds done in our own strength are as "filthy rags" Isaiah 64:6). Grace is the only way to we can continually show affection to brethren (Hebrews 13:1) and the only way to not neglect demonstrating affection to strangers (Hebrews 13:2).

Click for all 12 "let us..." exhortations in Hebrews (in the NASB).

Why should we "show gratitude"? Because we have a kingdom which cannot be shaken. This should inspire the most fervent worship and adoration. We should unceasingly praise Him with reverence and godly fear.

Kingdom which cannot be shaken - This emphasis on stability permeates Hebrews, the writer using a variety of Greek words that speak of stability...

Hebrews 2:2 For if the word spoken through angels proved unalterable, and every transgression and disobedience received a just recompense,

Hebrews 3:6 but Christ was faithful as a Son over His house whose house we are, if we hold fast our confidence and the boast of our hope firm until the end.

Hebrews 3:14 For we have become partakers of Christ, if we hold fast the beginning of our assurance firm until the end;

Hebrews 6:19 This hope we have as an anchor of the soul, a hope both sure and steadfast and one which enters within the veil,

Hebrews 9:17 For a covenant is valid (steadfast) only when men are dead, for it is never in force while the one who made it lives.

Hebrews 10:23 Let us hold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for He who promised is faithful;

Acceptable (2102) (euarestos from euárestos = pleasing, well–pleasing from eu = well + arésko = please) pertains to that which causes someone to be pleased. Pleasingly, acceptably. In an acceptable way, a manner well-pleasing to another.

How can our service be "acceptable" to God? To help understand meaning see root aresko (700) in Romans 8 where Paul writes that...

and those who are in the flesh cannot please (aresko) God. (see note Romans 8:8)

S Lewis Johnson writes that Romans 8:8...

is one of the clearest texts teaching that an unbelieving man cannot please God until a work of the Spirit has been performed on his inner man. In fact, it is a verse that plainly teaches that regeneration must precede faith. The reason is clear. Faith pleases God (He 11:6-note), but they that are in the flesh, the unsaved individuals, cannot please God. Thus, they cannot exercise faith as long as they are in the flesh. They exercise faith only after the Holy Spirit in efficacious grace takes them out of the flesh and puts them, in the Spirit by giving them new life. The first activity of the new life is to believe (cf. 1 John 5:1). The man dead in sins is given new life, which manifests itself in saving trust through the gospel. Could anything be plainer? To affirm that the unsaved man can believe is to deny the biblical teaching on total depravity and human inability; it is to lapse into Arminian error, as Dr. Lewis Sperry Chafer used to call it. (Romans 8:5-17)

Awe (127) (deos) from Homer down refers to fear or awe and then reverence. It is like an apprehension of danger as when alone in a deep, dark forest. Apprehension due to God's glory and majesty. It is that sense of profound respect and reverence for deity, in this case the living God, His majesty and holy presence.

When the voice and tread of a wild beast are distinctly heard close at hand the deos becomes phobos.

But what is this reverence and awe? Is is not similar to the repeated OT concept of the "fear of the Lord"? It is that affectionate reverence by which the child of God bends himself humbly and carefully to his Father’s law. His wrath is so bitter, and His love so sweet; that hence springs an earnest desire to please Him, and—because of the danger of coming short from his own weakness and temptations—a holy watchfulness and fear, “that he might not sin against him”.

As Ray Stedman (reference) says...

there are some things which cannot be shaken and which will remain forever. That which is shaken and removed is so done in order that what cannot be shaken may stand revealed. Such an unshakable thing is the kingdom of God into which those who trust in Jesus have entered. It is present wherever the King is honored, loved and obeyed. The present active participle (“are receiving”) indicates a continuing process. We enter the kingdom at conversion, but we abide in it daily as we reckon upon the resources which come to us from our invisible but present King. Such unbroken supply should arouse a continuing sense of gratitude within us and lead to acceptable worship of God. What renders such worship acceptable is the sense of God as incredibly powerful and majestic in person, and yet loving and compassionate of heart. An old hymn (play) puts it well:

Immortal, invisible, God only wise,
In light inaccessible, hid from our eyes.
How blessed, how glorious, the Ancient of Days
Almighty, Victorious, thy great name we praise!

><> ><> ><>

Our Daily Bread - Temporary Or Eternal - The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World were wonderful indeed! These impressive creations of human genius include the Tomb of Mausolos, built in 350 bc; the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus; the Hanging Gardens of Babylon; King Ptolemy's lighthouse near Alexandria; the 100-foot statue of Apollo called the Colossus of Rhodes; the 40-foot statue of Zeus in the city of Olympia; and the great pyramids of Egypt.

Six of these remarkable achievements have been destroyed--Ptolemy's lighthouse by an earthquake, and the other five demolished by plunderers. Only the pyramids remain to fill us with awe.

We may marvel over these Seven Wonders, but we must never forget that everything in our world is temporary. I remember looking at the skyline of New York City from the stern of a ferryboat and recalling the lines of a hymn: "These all shall perish, stone on stone; but not Thy kingdom nor Thy throne."

The writer of Hebrews said, "Since we are receiving a kingdom which cannot be shaken, let us . . . serve God acceptably with reverence and godly fear" (Heb 12:28). These words and the words of Psalm 102 help us to keep the temporary and the eternal in perspective. —Vernon C Grounds (
Our Daily Bread, Copyright RBC Ministries, Grand Rapids, MI. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved)

Swift to its close ebbs out life's little day,
Earth's joys grow dim, its glories pass away;
Change and decay in all around I see--
O Thou who changest not, abide with me! --Lyte

Hold tightly to what is eternal and loosely to what is temporal.

><> ><> ><>

Our Daily Bread - Frozen Snowball - Baseball pitcher Tug McGraw had a wonderful philosophy of pitching. He called it his “frozen snowball” theory.“ If I come in to pitch with the bases loaded, ”Tug explained,“ and heavy hitter Willie Stargell is at bat, there’s no reason I want to throw the ball. But eventually I have to pitch. So I remind myself that in a few billion years the earth will become a frozen snowball hurtling through space, and nobody’s going to care what Willie Stargell did with the bases loaded!”

The Bible tells us the earth will someday “melt with fervent heat; both the earth and the works that are in it will be burned up”(2Peter 3:10). Yet McGraw’s point is valid: We need to keep life in perspective. Most of the things we worry about have no eternal significance.

The writer of Hebrews was concerned about our perspective. Throughout the book, he keeps our eyes focused on heaven and away from earth. Unless our minds are on heaven, we will have little eternal influence on earth.

There will come a time when the earth will be shaken, and things that once seemed permanent will be gone (Hebrews 12:27). What you fear most today will be forgotten like yesterday’s headlines. What really matters is what you do today that has a touch of eternity about it.—Haddon W. Robinson (
Ibid)

O for a heart that is willing to serve,
Laboring while it is day!
Nothing is lost that is done for the Lord,
He will reward and repay. —Anon.

The one who lives for this life only will have eternity to regret it

 

Hebrews 12:29 for our God is a consuming fire  (NASB: Lockman)

Greek: kai gar o theos emon pur katanaliskon. (PAPNSN)
Amplified:  For our God [is indeed] a consuming fire. [Deut. 4:24.] (Amplified Bible - Lockman)
NLT:  For our God is a consuming fire. (NLT - Tyndale House)
Wuest:  for our God is a consuming fire. (
Eerdmans
Young's Literal:  for also our God is a consuming fire.

FOR OUR GOD IS A CONSUMING FIRE: kai gar o theos hemon pur katanaliskon. (PAPNSN): (Heb 10:27; Ex 24:17; Nu 11:1; 16:35; Deut 4:24; 9:3; Ps 50:3; 97:3; Isaiah 66:15; Daniel 7:9; 2Th 1:8)

For - term of explanation - Explains why we should have reverence and awe!

Stedman sums up this fifth and final warning writing that...

The proper attitude of Christians must be one of awe that a Being of such majesty and glory could find a way to dwell eternally with such sin controlled and sin-injured creatures as us. Since our “God is a consuming fire,” we must cry with Isaiah, “Who of us can dwell with the consuming fire? Who of us can dwell with everlasting burning?” (Isaiah 33:14). God’s love is just such a fire, it destroys what it cannot purify, but purifies what it cannot destroy. In Jesus we have a relationship that cannot be destroyed (Ro 8:38, 39-note). Our great king is leading us through trials and difficulties in order that we may at last cry with Job, “He knows the way that I take; when he has tried me, I shall come forth as gold” (Job 23:10KJV-note). (Hebrews 12:25-29 Fifth and Final Warning )

Is...consuming (2654) (katanalisko from katá  intensifies meaning of + analísko = consume) means to consume wholly or utterly as by fire and figuratively means to destroy completely.

This is the only NT use but there are 14 uses in the non-apocryphal Septuagint - Lev 6:10; Dt 4:24; 7:22; 9:3; 1Chr 21:26; Esther 8:12; Isa 59:14; Jer 3:24; 50:7; Da 11:26; Zeph 1:18; 3:8; Zech 9:4, 15

Note that katanalisko is in the present tense  which speaks of continuous action. In other words the text says that “our ‘God IS [not was!] a consuming fire.’ The God of Zion is the same God as the God of Sinai. God has not changed. Granted, Christians ought to laugh and in fact in one sense they ought to have the best sense of humor on this planet. And Christians ought to enjoy life but they must also know and understand that God remains a “Consuming fire” and that acceptable worship takes place when there is authentic “reverence and awe.” This is God’s Word! And so when we come to worship, we must keep both mountains in view, the approachable Mt Zion with its consuming love, and the unapproachable Mt Sinai with its consuming fire and then come in reverent boldness.

Consuming fire - one of the more awesome pictures of the perfect holiness of God: See Ex 24:17, Dt 4:24, 9:3 (cp Isa 66:15, Da 7:9, Rev 1:14). See note on Isaiah 10:17ff which describes God acting as a consuming fire in His destruction of the Assyrian Empire.

God is a consuming fire as shown by His actions against sin: Nu 11:1,16:35, Ps 50:3, 97:3,2Th 1:7-8 Zeph 3:8

Everything depends on how we see God. If we see Him Scripturally we will experience awe and reverence and there will be times when we are overwhelmed with the His majesty as our souls are engaged by the supremacy of God.

It is so easy to succumb to focusing on one mountain at the expense of the other. But theological balance is the key. Keep the paradox in view that our God is both unapproachable and approachable! The twin peaks of our spiritual life demand two things as we march toward Zion. The demand our obedience and our worship. Let us obey his Word implicitly, for it is effectual, never failing and ever final for it will one day (soon) shake the whole universe. Let us worship Him with reverence and awe and thanksgiving!

><> ><> ><>

Our Daily Bread - I'm Afraid Of God - Many times I have talked to people about our need to fear God. I've heard them respond something like this: "You're not really afraid of God, are you? I'd never believe in that kind of God."

Yes, I am afraid of God, and I'm not afraid to admit it. I also fear water. That doesn't mean I don't love to fish and swim. But I never want to forget the life-taking power of a river, a lake, or an ocean.

In a more personal way, I remember as a boy fearing my dad. I loved him and knew he loved me and was concerned for my good. But I respected his authority as my father, and I was afraid of the corrective measures he would take if I did wrong.

The same is true in my relationship with God. I stand in awe of Him and His holiness. And because I do, I love Him and want to be close to Him. I desire to love what He loves and hate what He hates. I want to live with the awareness that He is to be feared more than anyone. Satan and people may destroy the body, but God is "a consuming fire" who can "destroy both soul and body in hell" (Mt. 10:28).

Only as we fear God do we truly love Him. And only as that love grows will it guarantee that our fear of God is the right kind of fear. —Mart De Haan (
Our Daily Bread, Copyright RBC Ministries, Grand Rapids, MI. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved) 

To fear the Lord means giving Him
Our reverence, trust, and awe,
Acknowledging His sovereignty,
Submitting to His law. --Hess

Fear God and you will have nothing else to fear.

><> ><> ><>

Our Daily Bread - He Is A Fire - On December 5, 2002, the headline announced:

Ring Of Fire Encircles Sydney - A firestorm was raging outside the Australian city. Many people feared that this bushfire would prove to be Sydney's worst in decades. Fanned by strong winds, high temperatures, and low humidity, the fire jumped across roads and rivers, consuming everything in its path.

When we think about the destructive power of that kind of inferno, we gain a better understanding of the startling words of Hebrews 12:29, "Our God is a consuming fire."

Why did the author of Hebrews use such graphic imagery to describe the Lord? In his letter he was dealing with spiritual life-and-death issues—what his readers believed and the reality of their faith. Their response would reveal whether they were investing their lives in the kingdom that will last forever, or in the one destined for destruction.

We too need to remember that this world and all we possess are only temporary. If our faith and hope are in Jesus Christ, we are part of a kingdom that cannot be destroyed (v.28). Knowing that our days on earth are numbered and that "our God is a consuming fire," let us serve Him and invest in things that are imperishable.—Albert Lee (
Ibid)
 

Our God is a consuming fire
And will destroy earth's temporal things;
He seeks to purify our lives
For service to the King of kings. —D. De Haan

Hold tightly to what is eternal and loosely to what is temporal.

><> ><> ><>

Our Daily Bread - Revelation And Response - I tried to tell Felix about my faith. He was polite, but he said he would rather not discuss religion. His goal in life was to be a decent person and to find as much enjoyment as he could. He had concluded that death ends everything. He said he was happy with his beliefs.

Apparently Felix refused to think seriously about God's revelation of Himself in nature (Job 38; Ps. 19:1-6; Rom. 1:20) and within his own conscience (Rom. 1:18-21; 2:14-16).

God has revealed Himself in the created world, in our inner nature, and in the Bible. All people are responsible for what they do with God's self-disclosure. We can rationalize away His revelation in the created world. We can refuse the inner witness of our conscience. We can reject the Bible. But those responses lead to hell.

The best and most appropriate response to God's revelation is awe, acknowledgment of sin, and confession. This leads to forgiveness, inner peace, and everlasting life.

If you've rejected God's revelation of Himself, repent and turn to Him before it's too late. If you've decided to open your heart to Jesus Christ, you can be sure you'll be welcomed into His presence for all eternity. --H V Lugt   (
Ibid) 

The Lord reveals Himself to you
In many different ways;
So don't reject and turn away;
Instead, give Him your praise. --Sper

Sooner or later you'll have to face God.

><> ><> ><>

Our Daily Bread - I'm Afraid Of God- Many times I have talked to people about our need to fear God. I've heard them respond something like this: "You're not really afraid of God, are you? I'd never believe in that kind of God."

Yes, I am afraid of God, and I'm not afraid to admit it. I also fear water. That doesn't mean I don't love to fish and swim. But I never want to forget the life-taking power of a river, a lake, or an ocean.

In a more personal way, I remember as a boy fearing my dad. I loved him and knew he loved me and was concerned for my good. But I respected his authority as my father, and I was afraid of the corrective measures he would take if I did wrong.

The same is true in my relationship with God. I stand in awe of Him and His holiness. And because I do, I love Him and want to be close to Him. I desire to love what He loves and hate what He hates. I want to live with the awareness that He is to be feared more than anyone. Satan and people may destroy the body, but God is "a consuming fire" who can "destroy both soul and body in hell" (Mt. 10:28).

Only as we fear God do we truly love Him. And only as that love grows will it guarantee that our fear of God is the right kind of fear. —Mart De Haan  (
Ibid) 

To fear the Lord means giving Him
Our reverence, trust, and awe,
Acknowledging His sovereignty,
Submitting to His law. --Hess

Fear God and you will have nothing else to fear.

><> ><> ><>

Our Daily Bread -  Living In The Fire - Just before darkness settled, the Israelites who stood on the walls of Jerusalem saw with dismay the mighty Assyrian army surrounding the city. But at dawn the enemy camp was deserted, and thousands of dead soldiers lay scattered on the ground. What awe and gratitude must have filled the hearts of godly Israelites—but the wicked were terrified!

The prophet Isaiah portrays trembling sinners asking how they can live with "the devouring fire" and "everlasting burnings" (Isaiah 33:14). These phrases do not refer to hell, but to our holy God. Those hypocrites were really asking, "Who can live with Him?" Isaiah's answer was simple: "He who walks righteously and speaks uprightly" (v.15). It wasn't enough just to participate in religious ritual; Isaiah was reminding them that to live in the presence of the consuming fire they had to obey God.

Hebrews 12:29 reminds us that "our God is a consuming fire." How is it possible, then, to have a close relationship with Him? Jesus said, "If anyone loves Me, he will keep My word; and My Father will love him, and We will come to him and make Our home with him" (John 14:23).

If we trust Jesus as our Savior and seek to please Him, we need not fear living in the fire of His holiness. —Herbert Vander Lugt  (
Ibid) 

No sinner can endure God's fire,
His holiness consumes all sin;
But Jesus took our punishment—
Now we can have His peace within. —D. De Haan

God's holiness reveals what is good by consuming what is evil.

><> ><> ><>

Harry Ironsides gives the following illustration -  One of the first gospel illustrations that ever made a real impression upon my young heart was a simple story which I heard a preacher tell when I was less than nine years old.

It was of pioneers who were making their way across one of the central states to a distant place that had been opened up for homesteading. They traveled in covered wagons drawn by oxen, and progress was necessarily slow. One day they were horrified to note a long line of smoke in the west, stretching for miles across the prairie, and soon it was evident that the dried grass was burning fiercely and coming toward them rapidly. They had crossed a river the day before but it would be impossible to go back to that before the flames would be upon them. One man only seemed to have understanding as to what could be done. He gave the command to set fire to the grass behind them. Then when a space was burned over, the whole company moved back upon it.

As the flames roared on toward them from the west, a little girl cried out in terror, "Are you sure we shall not all be burned up?" The leader replied, "My child, the flames cannot reach us here, for we are standing where the fire has been!"

What a picture of the believer, who is safe in Christ!

On Him Almighty vengeance fell,
Which would have sunk a world to hell.
He bore it for a chosen race,
And thus becomes our Hiding Place.

The fires of God's judgment burned themselves out on Him, and all who are in Christ are safe forever, for they are now standing where the fire has been. (H. A. Ironside, Illustrations of Bible Truth, Moody Press, 1945, pp. 34-35)


Home | Site Index | Inductive Bible Study | Greek Word Studies | Commentaries by Verse | Area Precept Classes | Reference Search | Bible Dictionaries | Bible Maps | It's Greek to Me | Bible Commentaries | Discipline Yourself | Christian Biography | Wailing Wall | Bible Prophecy
Last Updated July, 2013

E-Mail