1 Chronicles Commentaries

1 CHRONICLES RESOURCES
Commentary, Sermon, Illustration, Devotional

1 Chronicles
Timeline & General Introduction

TIMELINE OF THE BOOKS OF
SAMUEL, KINGS & CHRONICLES

1107

1011

971

931

853

722

586

1Samuel 2Samuel 1Kings 1Kings 2Kings

31

1-4 5-10 11-20 21-24 1-11 12-22 1-17 18-25

1Chr

10

  1Chr
11-19
  1Chr
20-29

2Chronicles
1-9

2Chronicles
10-20

2Chronicles
21-36

Legend: B.C. dates at top of timeline are approximate. Note that 931BC marks the division of the Kingdom into Southern Tribes (Judah and Benjamin) and Ten Northern Tribes. To avoid confusion be aware that after the division of the Kingdom in 931BC, the Southern Kingdom is most often designated in Scripture as "Judah" and the Northern Kingdom as "Israel." Finally, note that 1Chronicles 1-9 is not identified on the timeline because these chapters are records of genealogy.

Summary of First and Second Chronicles…

I. Selected Genealogical History of Israel (1Chronicles 1–9)

II. Israel’s United Kingdom Under Saul (1Chronicles 10), David (1Chr 11–29), Solomon (2Chr 1–9)

III. Judah’s Monarchy in the Divided Kingdom (2Chronicles 10–36:21)

IV. Judah’s Release From Seventy Years of Captivity (2Chronicles 36:22, 23)

(Adapted from MacArthur Study Bible-now online)

1 Chronicles covers the same period of time as 2 Samuel and both describe the reign of David (See the Timeline above) whereas 2 Chronicles covers the same period of time as 1 Kings and 2 Kings and both describe the time from Solomon to the Babylonian Captivity. In Chronicles the kings of Israel (See table below where Jeroboam I identifies first of the kings of the 10 Northern tribes) are not mentioned unless they do something that relates to the kings of Judah. Note that the word "chronicle" means "a continuous and detailed account of historical events arranged in order of time." In First and Second Chronicles God has given us a very accurate history so that we can know all that He wants us to know about the period of the kings.

W A Criswell writes that Chronicles was…

Originally entitled "the words of the days" (divre hayyamim, Heb.), meaning "journals" (cf. 27:24), and compiled as a single book. 1 and 2 Chronicles were separated by the translators of the Septuagint circa 180 B.C. and named "things omitted" (paraleipomena, Gk.), to indicate that they contain things omitted from the Books of Samuel and Kings. Although the author and date are not stated, the Talmudic tradition that the Chronicles were penned by Ezra may be correct. Nevertheless, it is customary to speak of the author simply as "the chronicler." Written from a priestly perspective, the main emphasis centers on the temple in Jerusalem, the Levitical priesthood, and the theocratic lineage of David. The genealogies and narrative of 1 Chronicles span the period from Adam to the end of the life of David. Second Chronicles recounts the downfall of the Davidic dynasty from Solomon to the Exile. Chronicles mentions the northern kingdom (Israel) only incidentally and contains the most complete statistical lists found in the entire Bible. The final verses of Chronicles (2Chr. 36:22, 23) are repeated in Ezra 1:1-3. The style, substance, and thrust of the Chronicles are carried on through Ezra and Nehemiah. Many believe Chronicles, Ezra and Nehemiah had the same author. If not, the latter two still serve as a fitting sequel. Chronicles follows the people of God into Exile; Ezra and Nehemiah follow them out of Exile and prepare Israel for the coming of the Messiah.

The Chronicles were written to the returned remnant who were rebuilding Jerusalem following their seventy-year Babylonian captivity. The history of the Southern Kingdom (Judah) is presented in such a way as to help restore its religious and national heritage by showing its unbroken connection with the patriarchal beginnings. The primary historical theme centers about the priestly worship of Judah, from the time of Saul until the return of the Jewish nation to the land following the decree of Cyrus (538 B.C.). This religious history depicts the faithfulness and promises of God to His people, the power of the Word of God, and the central role of worship in the lives of God's people. In order to underscore these elements, the genealogies point to the forthcoming Messiah and are completed by those recorded in the New Testament (cf. Matt. 1:1-16; Luke 3:23-38).

Myer Pearlman writes..

Though "Kings" and "Chronicles" show great similarity in the matter of their contents, they are written from different viewpoints, the former being written from the human viewpoint, the latter, from the Divine. To illustrate:

1Kings 14:20 recording the death of Jeroboam, tells us that he "slept with his fathers." That is the human viewpoint.

2Chronicles 13:20, recording the same event, tells us that "the Lord struck him and he died." That is the divine viewpoint.

Dr. A. T. Pierson:

While much contained in the Books of Kings is repeated or restated in the Chronicles, much is omitted because foreign to the author's purpose. But whatever bears on the temple, its preservation and restoration, the purity of its worship, the regularity and orderliness of its services; whatever makes idolatrous rites or relics hateful, or lifts God to His true throne in the hearts of the people, is here emphasized.

J Sidlow Baxter writes about those genealogies…

Nine chapters of genealogical table I hate waste of space! Nay, rather, what blindness to think part of the Chronicles is more important. Such lines of descent were of sacred importance to all godly Jews, and rightly so, for they knew that their nation, besides being the repository of a special Divine revelation, was the possessor of wonderful Divine promises reaching on to unborn generations. The chronicler himself knew well enough that these genealogies reveal the selective process of Divine election right from Adam downwards, and that the covenant line of redemptive purpose was to culminate in the Messiah. Especially did the preservation of the trunk and main branches of Israel's family tree become vital after the Babylonian exile (when the Chronicles were written). Families had been uprooted by the thousand. Connections had been broken. Many records had been lost (see for instance Ezra 2:59), and Judah's archives must have become largely disintegrated even where not actually destroyed. Our chronicler's lists link the pre-Exile with the post-Exile period; for (as should be clearly grasped) 1Chr 9:2-34 concerns the resettlement in Judaea after the Exile. The break is marked by the first verse of that chapter, which should really be the last verse of the preceding chapter. The Angus Bible Handbook remarks: "These tables give the sacred line through which the promise was transmitted for nearly 3,500 years, a fact unexampled in the history of the human race." (Explore the Book)

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN
KINGS & CHRONICLES
SAMUEL &
KINGS
FIRST & SECOND
CHRONICLES
Prophetic Perspective:
Message of Judgment
Priestly Perspective:
Message of hope
Prophetic authorship:
Emphasizes the prophetic ministry
and moral concerns
Priestly authorship:
Emphasizes the priestly ministry
and spiritual concerns
The Fortunes
of the Thrones
Continuity
of the Davidic line
More Negative:
Rebellion & Tragedy
More Positive:
Apostasy, but hope in face of tragedy
Record of both
Israel and Judah
Record primarily
of Judah
Man's Failings God's Faithfulness
Morality Redemption
Emphasizes the throne
of earthly kings
Earthly throne (temple)
of the heavenly King
Emphasizes Kings
and Prophets
Emphasizes the Temple
and the Priests
Political
and kingly
Religious
and priestly
Compiled by authors
soon after the events
Compiled by by a priest:
Ezra many years after the events
Written shortly after the
beginning of the captivity in Babylon
Written shortly after
the return from the captivity

Adapted Wilkinson's Talk thru the Bible & Jensen's Survey of the OT

J Sidlow Baxter observes that…

beginning with 1Chr 11 (Ed: See following table), the whole of the remaining nineteen chapters of 1 Chronicles are occupied with the reign of David. In these chapters there is no repeating the familiar tale of David's romantic adventures, or of his reign at Hebron, or of his grief over Saul and Jonathan, or of his sin against Bathsheba and Uriah, or of the revolt of Absalom (these, not to mention others, are some of the significant major omissions); but, on the other hand, we are given with great fulness the following matters which are not mentioned in Samuel and Kings - David's abundant preparation of material in advance for the temple (1Chr 22), his preparatory numbering and distributing of the Levites and the priests (1Chr 23-24), his appointment and arrangement of singers and players and porters (1Chr 25:1-26) - all in anticipation of the temple (these, not to mention others, are some of the significant major additions). (Ibid)

John MacArthur observes that…

Two basic principles enumerated in these two books prevail throughout the OT, namely, obedience brings blessing, disobedience brings judgment. In the Chronicles, when the king obeyed and trusted the Lord, God blessed and protected. But when the king disobeyed and/or put his trust in something or someone other than the Lord, God withdrew His blessing and protection. Three basic failures by the kings of Judah brought God’s wrath: 1) personal sin; 2) false worship/idolatry; and/or 3) trust in man rather than God. (The MacArthur Study Bible or Online Version of MacArthur Study Bible)

FIRST CHRONICLES
SUMMARY CHART
1Chronicles 1-9:44 1Chronicles 10:1-39:30
Royal Line
of David
Reign
of David
12 Tribes
of David's Reign
Highlights
of David's Reign
Genealogies History
Ancestry Activity
1000's of Years Circa 33 Years

CHRIST IN 1 CHRONICLES
A M HODGKIN

1Chronicles --

These books cover the same period as 1 & 2 Kings, but they deal exclusively with the Kingdom of Judah [the southern kingdom] and with the House of David. They impress the importance of the worship of God upon the people. [Their interest is centered] around the Temple.

Genealogies. [1Chronicles 1-9]

The first nine chapters of the book are taken up with genealogies. Unpromising as these chapters appear, much may be learned from them. Perhaps the chief lesson is that of God's selection.

Chapter 10 gives an account of Saul's miserable end, and chapter 11 opens with the anointing of David [as] king over Judah in Hebron.

Bringing the Ark to Zion.

One of the first acts of David was to fetch the Ark of the Lord from the house of Abinadab, at Jebesh Gilead, to bring it to Zion [1Chronicles 13]. For twenty years the Ark with its mercy-seat, God's appointed meeting-place with His people, was neglected and almost forgotten-- a true picture of a heart out of communion with God. God ordained that the Ark should always be carried on the shoulders of the Levites, but they seem to have thought they could improve on God's plan, and the result of disobedience was death. God blessed the house of Obed-edom during the three months the Ark remained there, and David was encouraged to bring it to Mount Zion, to the tent he had prepared for it [1Chronicles 15].

David had now learned the lesson of obedience, for he says: ''None ought to carry the Ark of God but the Levites, for them hath the Lord chosen to carry the Ark of God and to minister unto Him for ever. And David gathered all Israel together to Jerusalem, to bring up the Ark of the Lord unto his place.'' For he desired to impress the whole nation with the importance of the event. The priests and Levites and singers, with their instruments of music, were each appointed to their several places. And David was clothed with a robe of fine linen and ''danced before the Lord with all his might'' (2Sam 6:14). It is a common sight today, in ''the changeless East,'' in any procession, to see a man dancing with strange attitudes to do honor to the bridegroom, or other hero of the day, and the more grotesque his attitudes the more honor is done. The man dances backwards, and with his dress girded to give free play to his limbs, as the common peasants gird themselves for active work. Thus, no doubt, David danced to do honor to God's Ark. Michal, the daughter of Saul, looked out at a window and saw him dancing and playing, and she despised him in her heart. The enthusiasm of God's people is still a matter of ridicule with the world, but would there were a little more of it in these days when people are more readily enthusiastic about anything else than His service! The Son of David showed such enthusiasm in the cleansing of the Temple that His disciples applied to Him the words, ''The zeal of Thine House hath eaten Me up'' [John 2:13-17].

Sacrifices were offered as the Ark left the house of Obed-edom; and, again, when it was set in the tent on Mount Zion, they offered burnt sacrifices and peace offerings [ch. 16]. The bringing of the Ark to Zion was typical of restored communion. In the presence of the Ark, with its blood-stained mercy-seat, the peace offerings could be offered. The peace offering included a meal of which the offerer partook before God. Reconciled and accepted, he was now God's guest and was privileged to eat bread in His presence. The joy which accompanied the bringing back of the Ark, and the feeding of the people with bread and meat and wine, are symbolic of the joy of restored communion and feeding upon Christ. (Ed: See caveats regarding Typology - Study of Biblical types)

God's Promise to David. [1Chronicles 17:1-27]

The great desire of David's heart was to build a temple for the Lord. God set this on one side because David had ''shed much blood upon the earth,'' but He promised that a son should be born unto him, who should be ''a man of rest,'' and should build Him a house, and God would establish his throne for ever.

David accepted God's decision without a murmur, and poured forth a song of praise for the condescension of His promise. In the promised Son we see ''a Greater than Solomon.'' ''Thou shalt call His name Jesus. He shall be great, and shall be called the Son of the Highest; and the Lord God shall give unto Him the throne of His father David: and He shall reign over the house of Jacob for ever; and of His kingdom there shall be no end'' (Luke 1:31-33).

The preservation of Israel as a nation is guaranteed till the end of time, ''as long as the sun and the moon endure'' (Jer 31:35-37). David's throne is secured as permanently, with the added sign, ''and as the faithful witness in the sky'' the rainbow (Psa 89:3,4,27-37). David's Son shall sit upon David's throne in Jerusalem. Christ Jesus ''is the only Person alive now as known to be of David's seed, and as possessing a right to David's throne.'' [Israel, My Glory, p.82, Rev. John Wilkinson]

Mount Moriah. [Chapter 21]

The next event in the history of the Temple was brought about through David's sin in numbering the people. His sin in this was no doubt twofold.

- - First, pride at the greatness of his kingdom;

- - second, no mention is made of the tribute money having been paid, as commanded by the Law of Moses, at the time of the census. ''When thou takest the sum of the Children of Israel after their number, then shall they give every man a ransom for his soul unto the Lord, when thou numberest them'' (Ex 30:12). The half shekel of silver, given by every man when he was numbered, was the token that the people belonged to the Lord: it was an acknowledgment of His right to their lives. This was evidently omitted in David's reign, and the plague came upon the people.

The plague was stayed at the threshing-floor of Ornan the Jebusite, on Mount Moriah, and David bought the threshing-floor from Ornan for fifty shekels of silver ''and built there an altar unto the Lord, and offered burnt offerings and peace offerings, and called upon the Lord; and He answered him from heaven by fire upon the altar of burnt offering'' (1Chr 21:26). Thus, the Temple, as well as the Tabernacle, rested upon the foundation of the silver redemption money. Mount Moriah was also the place of Abraham's sacrifice. All these circumstances are more than coincidences; they fall into their place in God's great plan of redemption.

David also bought the makoam (translated ''place'' [in vs. 22 and 25] ) of the threshing-floor from Ornan for six hundred shekels of gold. These makoams were sacred places, the ''places'' of the Canaanites (Deu 12:2,3), similar to the bamoth or ''high places'' so frequently mentioned in Scripture. They abound in Palestine today, and are called by the same word in the Arabic, mukam, ''place,'' and are very valuable, often bringing in great gain to their owners through those who come to worship there. This might account for David having to pay such a high price for the makaom as recorded in Chronicles, though he only paid fifty shekels of silver for the threshing-floor [Heb. goren] as recorded in [2Samuel 24:24]. They appear to have been two separate transactions. Ornan the Jebusite was one of the Canaanitish inhabitants of the land. The place was evidently a makoam as long back as the time when Abraham was told to offer Isaac on what was probably the same spot, for the word occurs four times in the brief narrative, applied to the summit of Moriah [Gen 22:3,4,9,14], afterwards to be Jehoavah's great makoam, where He would ''record His Name'' and place His temple. For Jehovah also would have His makoam. ''Offer not thy burnt offering in every makoam thou seest: but in the makoam that Jehovah shall choose in one of thy tribes, there thou shalt offer thy burnt offerings'' (Deu 12:13,14).

''In 2Sa 24:24, we read that David bought the oxen and threshing-floor of Araunah [another spelling of 'Ornan'] for fifty shekels of silver. From 1Chron 21:25, we learn that David gave six hundred shekels of gold for the place. It is extraordinary that any honest and intelligent mind could find a difficulty here. Fifty shekels of silver were presumably a fair price, though to us it seems very little, for the oxen and for the temporary use of the threshing-floor, for the purpose of the sacrifice. And this was all that the king had in view at the moment. The English reader must not base anything on the force of the English words 'buy' and 'bought' in 2Sam 24:24. The narrative in Chronicles suggests that it was the Lord's 'answering by fire' that led the king to go on to the purchase of the 'place'. But does any one imagine that the fee simple of 'the place'-- the entire site of the Temple-- was worth only fifty shekels? David went on to purchase the entire homestead out and out; and the price he paid for it was six hundred shekels of gold. And this is what the 'Chronicler' records.'' [The Bible and Modern Criticism, p. 161, Sir. Robt. Anderson]

David's Preparation. [1 Chronicles 22:1-19 and 1 Chronicles 28:1-21,1 Chronicles 29:1-30]

''Solomon my son is young and tender,'' said David, ''and the house that is to be builded for the Lord must be exceeding magnifical, of fame and of glory throughout all countries.''

''So David prepared abundantly before his death,'' and the princes and the people brought their offerings. ''Then the people rejoiced, for that they offered willingly, because with perfect heart they offered willingly to the Lord: and David the king also rejoiced with great joy.'' It is a marvelous thought that it brings joy to the heart of our King when we offer willingly to His service, whether it be ourselves or our dear ones, or our substance that we give. David's thanksgiving shows the right attitude of heart, the recognition that all indeed belongs to God. ''Who am I, and what is my people, that we should be able to offer so willingly after this sort? for all things come of Thee, and of Thine own have we given Thee'' (1Chr 29:14)

THE OLD TESTAMENT
REFLECTIONS OF CHRIST
PAUL R. VAN GORDER

1 CHRONICLES

The books of Chronicles repeat much of the history recorded in Kings. The events of 1Chronicles parallel those of 2Samuel, but they are seen through the eyes of the priest rather than the prophet. The book concentrates upon the history of Judah, speaking of Israel [ie., the Northern Kingdom] only when it comes in contact with the people and events of the Southern Kingdom.

Chronicles has been called by some ''the chosen book of the theocracy.'' It tells the story of a great king and points forward to an even greater King and kingdom. First Chronicles 17:24 sets the theme, ''Let the house of David, Thy servant, be established before Thee.''

OUTLINE OF THE BOOK--

The Royal Genealogy (1Chronicles 1-9)

The Parenthesis of Saul's Rule (1Chronicles 10)

The Reign of David (1Chronicles 11-29)

We will discuss three of the key questions that arise when one studies 1Chronicles.

THE REASON FOR THE GENEALOGIES--

We read in 2Timothy 3:16,17 that ''All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good words.'' The genealogies of 1Chronicles 1-9 fall within the scope of this passage. They are profitable for at least three reasons.

First, they were of great benefit to the Jews who returned from captivity in Babylon. During this time of confusion, the Israelites were in danger of losing their family and tribal identities. The lists helped them maintain their distinctives.

Second, the genealogies impressed the Jews with the unity of God. As they returned from captivity, the Israelites saw in the genealogies that the God who had restored them was the ''one true God'' of their fathers.

Third, the genealogies were a demonstration of the divine purpose being worked out until Christ's coming. They helped complete the Bible story of our Savior, who was the son of David, the son of Judah, the son of Abraham, and the son of Adam. He took their humanity, ''yet without sin.''

THE ARK BROUGHT TO JERUSALEM--

As [the narrative of] 1Chronicles opens [in chapter 11], David has been anointed king over Israel, and he is making preparation to bring the ark back to Jerusalem. The events that preceded this are recorded in 1Samuel 4-6. Why did David want the ark in Jerusalem? Because it symbolized God's presence in the midst of His people. In fact, it was the very place where God dwelt with His own. The most dishonoring thing that could have happened to Israel was for the ark to be captured by heathen enemies.

You may ask, ''What does this have to do with our subject? How does it speak of Christ in the Old Testament Scriptures?'' Just as the ark of the covenant in the Holy of holies was the dwelling place of God among Israel, so the church is the dwelling place of God with His people in this age. Oh, I'm not speaking of a building, an edifice, but rather the church, which is the body of Christ. Paul wrote,

Now, therefore, ye are no more strangers and sojourners, but fellow citizens with the saints, and of the household of God; And are built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Jesus Christ Himself being the chief cornerstone, In whom all the building fitly framed together groweth unto an holy temple in the Lord; In whom ye also are built together for an habitation of God through the Spirit. (Eph 2:19-22)

As you read the first few chapters of Acts, you see a risen, glorified, immortal Savior communing with mortals. For 40 days, He was with them, then He led His disciples out to Bethany and told them,

But ye shall receive power, after the Holy Spirit is come upon you; and ye shall be witnesses unto Me, both in Jerusalem, and in all Judea, and in Samaria, and unto the uttermost part of the earth (Acts 1:8).

No instruction like this can be found in all the Old Testament! Pentecost followed Christ's ascension, and the changes were noted immediately. On that day they were all Jews, and they witnessed first to the Jews, with 3,000 being converted. Persecution followed. Peter was sent to the Gentiles. Converted Jews began to fraternize with previously hated Gentiles. These new believers, Jew and Gentile, forsook the temple and met in houses. They discarded the elaborate rituals, replacing them with the simple ordinances. They set aside the sabbath day in favor of Sunday, the Lord's Day. Why? Because the ascended Lord Jesus had sent the Holy Spirit to dwell with them, and they were carrying out His word.

DAVID'S FAILURE--

What has happened to the church in the intervening centuries? David's failure to handle the ark correctly, as recorded in 1Chronicles 13, is a picture of the church's failure today. Consider these points:

David consulted men rather than God's Word (1Chronicles 13:1).

The New Testament commands that we are not to be menpleasers, but ''the servants of Christ, doing the will of God from the heart'' (Eph 6:6).

David was popular with the people.

''All the congregation said that they would do so; for the thing was right in the eyes of all the people'' (13:4). Popularity often wrecks both men and churches. The works of the flesh never get a single convert. The church of the Lord Jesus Christ will never impress the world by becoming worldly (Jam 4:4).

David used human methods instead of God's plans.

The Lord had given plain instruction for transporting the ark. The tribe of Levi was set aside for the tabernacle service, and they were to bear the ark by means of staves that fit through rings fastened to its side [Ex 25:10-15; Num 4:15]. There was no place for wheels. Yet David used an ox cart, like [the one] used by the Philistines [1Sam 6:1,2,7,8]. Likewise, the church cannot be driven by artificial means or worldly methods. All sorts of gimmicks are used in the Lord's work today. But God has ordained that men are to be saved through ''the foolishness of preaching.'' ''Faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word of God'' (Rom 10:17). Substituting human efforts for God's way will always bring disaster.

The tragedy of the affair.

Everything seemed to be going right. There was music and dancing, a new cart, and oxen. The cart got as far as the threshing floor, and then the animals stumbled. Uzza, a man not appointed of God to carry the ark, reached out to steady it. God smote him dead! Poor fellow, he actually thought he was doing a service to God. Evidently, no one had instructed him. He was doing what he was told, and now he was dead. How sad-- yet it's happening today! The church is filled with men and women who think they are doing God a service, while indeed they are ''dead in trespasses and sins.'' It's a travesty upon divine grace and order to get people to serve the Lord when they are either unconverted or carnal Christians working in their own strength.

For three months, the ark was stored in the residence of Obed-edom. The glory of God was hidden in a house! No sign of God's presence could be found in Israel. Everything was dead and cold, just like the Philistines. But the house of Obed-edom was greatly blessed. When the presence of God is experienced in the life of an individual, His rich blessings always abound.

The sequel to this story is found in 1Chronicles 15, when David finally did things God's way. The priests and the Levites ''sanctified themselves to bring up the ark of the Lord God of Israel'' (1Chronicles 15:14). When the ark was safely inside, communion with God was restored.

The secret of an effective, powerful, growing church is to acknowledge the presence of God's Spirit and to obey His leading in every aspect of church life and ministry. God's work must be done God's way.

1 SAMUEL / 2 SAMUEL
1 KINGS / 1 KINGS
1 CHRONICLES / 2 CHRONICLES
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ALBERT BARNES
Notes on the Old Testament
1 Chronicles

BIBLE.ORG
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BIBLICAL ILLUSTRATOR
1 Chronicles
Illustrations, Outlines, Anecdotes
Expositions, Homiletics, Commentary

CAMBRIDGE BIBLE COMMENTARY
1 Chronicles
William E Barnes
1899

 

ALAN CARR
Sermon Notes
1 Chronicles
Calvary Baptist, Lenoir, NC
Well Done Notes

RICH CATHERS
Sermon Notes
1 Chronicles
Calvary Chapel

CENTURY BIBLE COMMENTARY
1 Chronicles
General Editor: Walter Adeney
W. Harvey-Jellie
(1904-1913)

 

ADAM CLARKE
Commentary on 1 Chronicles

Click for brief critique of Clarke

A CRITICAL AND EXEGETICAL COMMENTARY
ON 1 CHRONICLES
EDWARD L CURTIS, ALBERT A MADSEN
From International Critical Commentary Series
1910

Caveat -Higher Criticism is the art of seeing literature exactly as it is and of estimating it accordingly. It becomes negative criticism, often described as "the historical-critical method," when it assumes the right to pass rationalistic judgment on Scripture's own claims about its composition and historicity. Such a method necessarily presupposes that the Bible's claims are not inerrant. It thus disqualifies itself as truly scientific criticism, sine it refuses to view the object being analyzed according to its proper (divine) character. (There are) present-day attempts by negative critics to infiltrate evangelicalism with views that subordinate the authority of Christ and of Scripture to the judgments of men." From "Higher Criticism" edited by Norman Geisler - Some Pages Missing but still worth reading.

COMMENTARY
CRITICAL AND EXPLANATORY ON THE WHOLE BIBLE
ROBERT JAMIESON, A. R. FAUSSET AND DAVID BROWN.
Published 1871 - One of the Better Older Commentary
Tends to be more conservative and literal. Avoids spiritualizing.

Spurgeon's Comment: "Of this I have a very high opinion. It is the joint work of Mr. Jamieson, A. R. Fausset, and Dr. David Brown. It is to some extent a compilation and condensation of other men’s thoughts, but it is sufficiently original to claim a place in every minister’s library; indeed it contains so great a variety of information that if a man had no other exposition he would find himself at no great loss if he possessed this and used it diligently."

THOMAS CONSTABLE
Notes on 1 Chronicles
Conservative, Millennial

 

RON DANIEL
Sermon Notes
1 Chronicles

JOHN DUMMELOW
Commentary
1 Chronicles

JOHN ELLICOTT
Old Testament Commentary
for English Readers
1 Chronicles

These appear to be fairly good notes and need no knowledge of Hebrew to use.

EXPLORE THE BIBLE
1 Chronicles
by Mike Calvert

Written for the LifeWay Explore the Bible Sunday School curriculum

1 Chronicles; 2 Samuel DAVID- LESSONS ON FAITH & FRAILTY

1 Chronicles 20:1-3; 2 Samuel 11:1-20:26, TROUBLE IN THE FAMILY

1 Chronicles 11:10-41; 20:4-8 2 Sa 21:1-24:25 - TRUST IN THE LORD

EXPOSITOR'S BIBLE COMMENTARY
1 CHRONICLES

Warren W. Wiersbe - If you can locate the six-volume edition of the Expositor’s Bible, buy it immediately! It takes up less space than the original fifty-volume set, and not everything in the original set is worth owning. Samuel H. Kellogg on Leviticus is a classic; so is Alexander Maclaren on the Psalms and on Colossians. (A Basic Library for Bible Students)

Cyril J. Barber - This set, originally published in 1903, contains expositions by both conservative and liberal theologians. The most important works are by Dod (Genesis), Chadwick (Exodus and Mark), Kellogg (Leviticus), Blaikie (Joshua, I and II Samuel), Adeney (Ezra, Nehemiah and Esther), Maclaren (Psalms), Moule (Romans), Findlay (Galatians and Ephesians), Plummer (Pastoral Epistles and the Epistles of James and Jude), and Milligan (Revelation.) (The Minister’s Library)

A C GAEBELEIN
Commentary on 1 Chronicles
Annotated Bible

JOHN GILL
Commentary on 1 Chronicles

GOTQUESTIONS
Related to
Book of 1 Chronicles

JOE GUGLIELMO
Notes on 1 Chronicles
Calvary Chapel, Manitowoc, Wisconsin

DAVE GUZIK
Commentary on 1 Chronicles
Conservative, Evangelical, Millennial Perspective

HYMNS
Relating to 1 Chronicles

ROBERT HAWKER
Poor Man's Commentary
1 Chronicles

MATTHEW HENRY
Commentary on 1 Chronicles
(1706)

H A IRONSIDE
1 & 2 Kings; 1 & 2 Chronicles
The Kings of Judah & Israel

 

RUDOLF KITTEL
1 Chronicles Commentary
(1895)

"It is not only valuable, but indispensable." —The London Quarterly Review

"Examining the composition of the English translation based on the reconstruction of the original Hebrew, R. Kittel provides critical examination of the text with regard for semantic interpretation and historical context. Kittel draws upon the Masoretic Text, LXX, Targum manuscripts, Peshita, and Latin Vulgate in order to draw conclusions on semantic variation and omission. He incorporates views from the early Church fathers in order to provide further clarification on key topics." - Logos.com

 

JOHN KITTO
Commentary on 1 Chronicles
Pictorial Bible

Spurgeon's Comments on Kitto: "Then, of course, gentlemen, you will economize rigidly until you have accumulated funds to purchase Kitto’s Pictorial Bible. You mean to take that goodly freight on board before you launch upon the sea of married life. As you cannot visit the Holy Land, it is well for you that there is a work like the Pictorial Bible, in which the notes of the most observant travellers are arranged under the texts which they illustrate. For the geography, zoology, botany, and manners and customs of Palestine, this will be your counselor and guide… A work of art as well as learning."

KEIL AND DELITZSCH
Commentary
1 Chronicles

James Rosscup - "Keil, C. F. and Franz Delitzsch. Commentary on the Old Testament. 25 volumes. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1950. This is the best older, overall treatment of a critical nature on the Old Testament Hebrew text verse by verse and is a good standard work to buy. The student can buy parts or the whole of this series. Sometimes it is evangelical, at other times liberal ideas enter." (Commentaries for Biblical Expositors: An Annotated Bibliography of Selected Works)

PAUL E. KRETZMANN
Commentary
1 Chronicles
(Lutheran Perspective)

LANGE COMMENTARY
Commentary on 1 Chronicles
Otto Zockler

Spurgeon's Comments on Lange's Series: "These volumes are not all of equal value, but as a whole, they are a grand addition to our stores. The American translators have added considerably to the German work, and in some cases these additions are more valuable than the original matter. For homiletical purposes these volumes are so many hills of gold, but, alas, there is dross also, for Baptismal Regeneration and other grave errors occur… We are very far from endorsing all Zöckler’s remarks." (Caveat: Be a Berean - Acts 17:11)

ALEXANDER MACLAREN
Sermons 1 Chronicles

J VERNON MCGEE
Commentary on 1 Chronicles
Thru the Bible
Note: These are Mp3's Only

1 Chronicles Thru the Bible Commentary, Individual Mp3's
Right click and select "Save Target As" (to Desktop, Ipod, etc)

F B MEYER
Our Daily Homily
on 1 Chronicles

MISCELLANEOUS RESOURCES
1 Chronicles
Conservative, Evangelical

THE THEOLOGICAL JOURNAL LIBRARY on galaxie.com

An annual $50 or monthly $5 subscription (click here) is required to view the entire article but will give you access to literally thousands of conservative articles. You can search by topic, author, or bible reference

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GENERAL RESOURCES
Outlines, Maps, Sermons, Commentaries on 1 Chronicles

BEST COMMENTARIES

BAKER'S EVANGELICAL DICTIONARY OF BIBLICAL THEOLOGY

HENRY MORRIS

  • Defender's Study Bible - Excellent, conservative, literal study Bible notes from a leading creationist commentator, Dr Henry Morris. See links to notes in right margin.

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CROSSWAY PUBLISHING

HOLMAN

NET BIBLE

  • NET Study Bible - Excellent resource, includes NETBible notes and Thomas Constable's notes that synchronize with the Scriptures.

CHRIS BENFIELD

BRIAN BILL

BIBLE.ORG

DAVID COLBURN

A Chronological Daily Bible Study of the Old Testament- 7-Day Sections with a Summary-Commentary, Discussion Questions, and a Practical Daily Application

HENRY COWLES

MARCUS DODS

DICTIONARY ARTICLES

JOHN DUMMELOW

GOSPEL COALITION

JAMES GRAY

DAVID HOLWICK

WILLIAM KELLY

STEVE KRELOFF

DAVID MALICK

JOHN MACARTHUR

Outline of 1 Chronicles

I. Selective Genealogy (1 Chronicles 1:1–9:34)

A. Adam to Before David (1 Chronicles 1:1–2:55)

B. David to the Captivity (1 Chronicles 3:1–24)

C. Twelve Tribes (1 Chronicles 4:1–9:2)

D. Jerusalem Dwellers (1 Chronicles 9:3–34)

II. David’s Ascent (1 Chronicles 9:35–12:40)

A. Saul’s Heritage and Death (1 Chronicles 9:35–10:14)

B. David’s Anointing (1 Chronicles 11:1–3)

C. Jerusalem’s Conquest (1 Chronicles 11:4–9)

D. David’s Men (1 Chronicles 11:10–12:40)

III. David’s Reign (1 Chronicles 13:1–29:30)

A. The Ark of the Covenant (1 Chronicles 13:1–16:43)

B. The Davidic Covenant (1 Chronicles 17:1–17:27)

C. Selected Military History (1 Chronicles 18:1–21:30)

D. Temple-Building Preparations (1 Chronicles 22:1–29:20)

E. Transition to Solomon (1 Chronicles 29:21–29:30)

The Kings of Israel and Judah
United Kingdom
Saul 1 Samuel 9:1–31:13; 1 Chronicles 10:1–14
David 2 Sa; 1 Kings 1:1–2:9; 1 Chronicles 11:1–29:30
Solomon 1 Kings 2:10–11:43; 2 Chronicles 1:1–9:31
Northern Kingdom (Israel)
Jeroboam I 1 Kings 12:25–14:20
Nadab 1 Kings 15:25–31
Baasha 1 Kings 15:32–16:7
Elah 1 Kings 16:8–14
Zimri 1 Kings 16:15–20
Tibni 1 Kings 16:21, 22
Omri 1 Kings 16:21–28
Ahab 1 Kings 16:29–22:40

Ahaziah

1 Kings 22:51–53; 2 Kings 1:1–18

Jehoram; Joram 2 Kings 2:1–8:15
Jehu 2 Kings 9:1–10:36
Jehoahaz 2 Kings 13:1–9
Jehoash; Joash 2 Kings 13:10–25
Jeroboam II 2 Kings 14:23–29
Zechariah 2 Kings 15:8–12
Shallum 2 Kings 15:13–15
Menahem 2 Kings 15:16–22
Pekahiah 2 Kings 15:23–26
Pekah 2 Kings 15:27–31
Hoshea 2 Kings 17:1–41
Southern Kingdom (Judah)

Rehoboam

1 Kings 12:1–14:31; 2 Chronicles 10:1–12:16

Abijam (Abijah) 1 Kings 15:1–8; 2 Chronicles 13:1–22
Asa 1 Kings 15:9–24; 2 Chronicles 14:1–16:14
Jehoshaphat 1 Kings 22:41–50; 2 Chronicles 17:1–20:37
Jehoram; Joram 2 Kings 8:16–24; 2 Chronicles 21:1–20
Ahaziah 2 Kings 8:25–29; 2 Chronicles 22:1–9
Athaliah (Queen) 2 Kings 11:1–16; 2 Chronicles 22:1–23:21
Jehoash; Joash 2 Kings 11:17–12:21; 2 Chronicles 23:16–24:27
Amaziah 2 Kings 14:1–22; 2 Chronicles 25:1–28
Uzziah (Azariah) 2 Kings 15:1–7; 2 Chronicles 26:1–23

Jotham

2 Kings 15:32–38; 2 Chronicles 27:1–9

Ahaz 2 Kings 16:1–20; 2 Chronicles 28:1–27
Hezekiah 2 Kings 18:1–20:21; 2 Chronicles 29:1–32:33
Manasseh 2 Kings 21:1–18; 2 Chronicles 33:1–20
Amon

2 Kings 21:19–26; 2 Chronicles 33:21–25

Josiah 2 Kings 22:1–23:30; 2 Chronicles 34:1–35:27
Jehoahaz 2 Kings 23:31–33; 2 Chronicles 36:1–4
Jehoiakim 2 Kings 23:34–24:7; 2 Chronicles 36:5–8
Jehoiachin 2 Kings 24:8–16; 2 Chronicles 36:9, 10
Zedekiah 2 Kings 24:18–25:21; 2 Chronicles 36:11–21

MAPS

The Kingdom of David and Solomon

The Kingdoms of Israel and Judah

Judah Alone amid International Powers

J VERNON MCGEE

MONERGISM

WILLIAM MOOREHEAD

G CAMPBELL MORGAN

G CAMPBELL MORGAN

NIV STUDY BIBLE

WILLIAM ORR

MYER PEARLMAN

HENRI ROSSIER

REFORMATION STUDY BIBLE

ROB SALVATO

SERMON CENTRAL

JAMES SMITH - CLICK HERE FOR STUDIES LISTED BELOW

  • 1 Chronicles 12:16-18 YOURS ARE WE.
  • 1 Chronicles 16:7-36 A SONG OF THANKSGIVING, AND WHAT IT TEACHES.
  • 1 Chronicles 21:22-28 THE KING'S REQUEST; Or, CONSECRATED TO SAVE.
  • 1 Chronicles 29:1-9 A CALL FOR CONSECRATED SERVICE.

RAY STEDMAN

CHARLES SWINDOLL

Excerpt - What's the big idea? Why do we need the books of 1–2 Chronicles when we already have the history of 2 Samuel and 1–2 Kings? Just as the gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John each offer a different perspective on the life of Jesus, so the books of Chronicles present Israel’s history with a purpose different than the other historical books. The books of 2 Samuel and 1–2 Kings reveal the monarchies of Israel and Judah—in particular the sins of the nations that resulted in the exile. But the books of Chronicles, written after the time of the exile, focus on those elements of history that God wanted the returning Jews to meditate upon: obedience that results in God’s blessing, the priority of the temple and priesthood, and the unconditional promises to the house of David. David’s prayer in 1 Chronicles 29:10–19 summarizes the themes the chronicler wished to communicate: glory to God, gratitude for gifting David’s family with leadership of the nation, and the desire that David’s descendants continue to devote themselves to God. Remaining faithful to God would reap blessing. When the book was written, David’s descendants no longer ruled as monarchs over Israel. But the chronicler desired the people to remember the royal Davidic lineage, for God had promised a future ruler would rise from that line. After the seventy-year exile in Babylon, Jewish political and social power resided more with the religious rather than political rulers. Telling Israel’s history through a priestly and kingly lens was intended to prepare the people for a future Messiah.

How do I apply this? Read David’s magnificent prayer in 1 Chronicles 29. Consider your own spiritual heritage. Would you like to model such godly strength and character as his to your own children? What steps do you need to take in order to echo truthfully David’s attitude in verse 11, “Yours, O LORD, is the greatness and the power and the glory and the majesty and the splendor, for everything in heaven and earth is yours” (NIV)? Knowing that He tests the heart and is pleased with integrity (1 Chronicles 29:17), ask the Spirit to fill you daily and guide your steps that future generations might be blessed.

JAMES VAN DINE

VERSE BY VERSE
RESOURCES ON FIRST CHRONICLES

RICHARD PRATT

JOHN KITTO - PICTORIAL BIBLE

HORATIUS BONAR

HANDBOOK OF MANNERS

GENE L. JEFFRIES

RAY STEDMAN

BRIAN BILL

GENE JEFFRIES

ALAN CARR

SHARAD YADAV

PHIL JOHNSON

C H SPURGEON

RICHARD PRATT

ALAN CARR

C H SPURGEON

MARCUS DODS

HANDBOOK OF MANNERS

JOHN GILL

CHARLES SIMEON (BIO)

JOHN GILL

ROBERT NEIGHBOUR

J R MILLER

RICHARD PRATT

HENRY MAHAN

LIFEWAY

T. AUSTIN-SPARKS

C H SPURGEON

MARCUS DODS

EDWARD PAYSON

CHARLES SIMEON

HANDBOOK OF MANNERS

WILLIAM BARRICK

MARCUS DODS

F B MEYER

MARCUS DODS

DEREK THOMAS

RICHARD PRATT

HORATIUS BONAR

STEVE KRELOFF

J. G. BELLET

THEODORE EPP

C H SPURGEON

WOODROW KROLL

HANDBOOK OF MANNERS

T AUSTIN SPARKS

ALAN CARR

MARCUS DODS

MARCUS DODS

CHARLES SIMEON (BIO)

JAMES HASTINGS

C H SPURGEON

BRIAN BILL

M W TILESTON

J LIGON DUNCAN

RICHARD PRATT

MARCUS DODS

JOHN PIPER

ALAN CARR

JAMES G. MURPHY
1 Chronicles Commentary
1880

"Far beyond anything indicated by the small price of this work is its exceeding value for thoroughness of verbal exposition, exegetical criticism, and homiletic suggestiveness."—Baptist magazine

"It contains a vast amount of information, which ministers, Sunday-school teachers, and Bible classes may turn to good account." —Christian World

Note: An interesting feature is a set of usually 10-11 questions at the end of each chapter.

NET BIBLE
Commentary Notes

NETBible notes are in the right panel. You can also select the tab for "Constable's Notes." As you scroll the Bible text in the left panel, the notes are synchronized and will scroll to the same passage. This is a very helpful feature.

JAMES NISBET
Church Pulpit Commentary
1 Chronicles

Our Daily Bread
1 Chronicles
Excellent devotional illustrations
RBC Ministries

PASTOR LIFE
Sermons
Book of 1 Chronicles

Secrets of Discernment 1 Chronicles 12:32 Discernment Alan Stewart
Thanking God For His Presence 1 Chronicles 16 Thanksgiving; Praise; Gratitude; God, Presence of David E. Owen
Seek The Lord 1 Chronicles 16:10-11 God, Presence of; God, Seeking; Desire of the Heart; New Year Franklin L. Kirksey
A Magnificent Obsession 1 Chronicles 16:23-29 Glory; God's Glory J. Gerald Harris
When God Says No 1 Chronicles 28 Will, God's; Purpose; Submission Franklin L. Kirksey
What's In Your Wallet? 1 Chronicles 29:1-13 Money; Materialism James Merritt

MATTHEW POOLE
Commentary
1 Chronicles

PREACHER'S COMPLETE HOMILETICAL COMMENTARY
1 CHRONICLES
JAMES WOLFENDALE
1890

 

PULPIT COMMENTARY
1 CHRONICLES

 

DON ROBINSON
Sermon Notes 1 Chronicles

ROB SALVATO
Sermon Notes 1 Chronicles

SERMON BIBLE COMMENTARY
1 Chronicles

CHARLES SIMEON
Sermons
1 Chronicles

CHUCK SMITH
Sermon Notes 1 Chronicles
Calvary Chapel

Notes below similar to C2000 Series

SPEAKER'S COMMENTARY
1 CHRONICLES

Spurgeon's Comment: The Speaker’s Commentary is issued (August, 1875) as far as the Lamentations. It is costly, too costly for your pockets, and I am therefore somewhat the less sorry to add that it is not what I hoped it would be. Of course it is a great work, and contains much which tends to illustrate the text; but if you had it you would not turn to it for spiritual food, or for fruitful suggestion, or if you did so, you would be disappointed. The object of the work is to help the general reader to know what the Scriptures really say and mean, and to remove some of the difficulties. It keeps to its design and in a measure accomplishes it."

C. H. SPURGEON
All of Spurgeon's Sermons on
1 Chronicles

C H SPURGEON
Devotionals on 1 Chronicles
Morning and Evening
Faith's Checkbook

THIRD MILLENNIUM
1 Chronicles Studies
Well Done - Recommended

NOTES ON THE TEXT

1 Chronicles 1

1 Chronicles 2

1 Chronicles 3

1 Chronicles 4

1 Chronicles 5

1 Chronicles 6

1 Chronicles 7

1 Chronicles 8

1 Chronicles 9

1 Chronicles 10

1 Chronicles 11

1 Chronicles 12

1 Chronicles 13

1 Chronicles 14

1 Chronicles 15

1 Chronicles 16

1 Chronicles 17

1 Chronicles 18

1 Chronicles 19

1 Chronicles 20

1 Chronicles 21

1 Chronicles 22

1 Chronicles 23

1 Chronicles 24

1 Chronicles 25

1 Chronicles 26

1 Chronicles 27

1 Chronicles 28

1 Chronicles 29

TODAY IN THE WORD
Devotionals on 1 Chronicles
Moody Bible Institute

JOHN TRAPP
Commentary
1 Chronicles

DANIEL WHEDON
Commentary
1 Chronicles

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DISCLAIMER: Before you "go to the commentaries" go to the Scriptures and study them inductively (Click 3 part overview of how to do Inductive Bible Study) in dependence on your Teacher, the Holy Spirit, Who Jesus promised would guide us into all the truth (John 16:13). Remember that Scripture is always the best commentary on Scripture. Any commentary, even those by the most conservative and orthodox teacher/preachers cannot help but have at least some bias of the expositor based upon his training and experience. Therefore the inclusion of specific links does not indicate that we agree with every comment. We have made a sincere effort to select only the most conservative, "bibliocentric" commentaries. Should you discover some commentary or sermon you feel may not be orthodox, please email your concern. I have removed several links in response to concerns by discerning readers. I recommend that your priority be a steady intake of solid Biblical food so that with practice you will have your spiritual senses trained to discern good from evil (Heb 5:14-note).