Haggai Commentaries & Sermons

See disclaimer

OVERVIEW CHART
OF HAGGAI


Click chart to enlarge
Chart from recommended resource Jensen's Survey of the OT - used by permission
Haggai Chart from Charles Swindoll
Another Haggai Chart

HAGGAI
"Put First Things First"
3 WEEKS 2 MONTHS 1 DAY
Hag 1:1-2 Hag 1:3-6 Hag 1:7-11 Hag 1:12-15 Hag 2:1-9 Hag 2:10-19 Hag 2:20-23

Consider Your Ways…
My house that is in ruins

Glory of the
Latter Temple
shall be greater
From this day forward I will bless you I will shake
heaven
and earth

Completion of
the Latter Temple

Glory of
the Latter Temple

Present Blessing of Obedience

Future Blessing thru Promise
Prophet's
First Sermon
Hag 1:1-11
People's Response
Hag 1:12-15
Prophet's
Second Sermon
Hag 2:1-9
Prophet's
Third Sermon
Hag 2:10-19
Prophet's
Fourth Sermon
Hag 2:20-23

REPROOF
Hag 1:4

ASSURANCE
Hag 1:13

ENCOURAGEMENT
Hag 2:4

BLESSING
Hag 2:19

PROMISE
Hag 2:20-23

People are rebuked
for discontinuing temple project

People are
stirred
Greater glory
is promised
Blessing is
promised
Zerubbabel
is honored
TEMPLE OF GOD
Present condition of Jerusalem Temple
BLESSINGS OF GOD
Future glory of God's House
PEOPLE'S WORK PROMINENT GOD'S WORK PROMINENT
EMPHASIS:
Practical, negative, confronting
EMPHASIS:
Spiritual, positive, comforting
"I called for
a drought on the land"
Hag 1:11
"I am
with you"
Hag 1:13
"I will fill this house
with glory"
Hag 2:7
"I will
bless you"
Hag 2:19
"I will make
you a signet"
Hag 2:23

Background:
Temple Begun 536BC
Temple Discontinued 534BC

   

520BC Charge to
Resume Building

Work Begun
Hag 1:14

Encouragement to Finish -
Finished 516BC - Ezra 6:15

Book Opens With
A Problem
Hag 1:2
 

Book Closes With

A Promise

Hag 2:23

Key Words:

  • Word of the Lord came (Hag 1:1, 3, 2:1, 2:10, 2:20),
  • Rebuilt/rebuild (Hag 1:2, 8),
  • Consider your ways (Hag 1:5, 7), LORD of hosts (of armies) (14x/12v - Hag 1:2, 5, 7, 9, 14, Hag 2:4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 23),
  • House (Hag 1:2, 4, 9, 14, Hag 2:7, 9);
  • Temple (Hag 1;8, 2:3, 2:15, 2:18),
  • Glory (Hag 2:3, 7, 9),
  • Day of the month - Hab 1:1, 1:15, 2:1, 2:20;
  • People (Hag 1:2, 12, 13, 14, 2:2, 4, 14);
  • Shake (Hag 2:6, 7, 21).
  • See related discussion - key words and marking key words
Key Verse: Hag 1:4-5, Hag 2:7-9

Christ in Haggai: Christ's presence in the Temple (Jn 1:1, 14, Lk 2:32b), which was further expanded and adorned by Herod, is " ‘The latter GLORY of this house will be greater than the former,’ says the LORD of hosts, ‘and in this place I shall give PEACE,’ declares the LORD of hosts." (Hag 2:9) Jesus is our PEACE (Eph 2:14-note) and His future rule in the Millennium will establish worldwide peace (Hag 2:9). "On that day,’ declares the LORD of hosts, ‘I will take you, Zerubbabel, son of Shealtiel, My servant,’ declares the LORD, ‘and I will make you like a signet ring (02368), for I have chosen you,’” declares the LORD of hosts." (Hag 2:23) Righteous Zerubbabel is a foreshadowing of Christ, as well as in the genealogy of the Messiah (Mt 1:12,13, Lk 3:27).

CHRIST IN ALL THE SCRIPTURE
Christ in Haggai
A M Hodgkin

Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi are the three prophets to the restored remnant that returned from Babylon. They all make frequent use of the title ''The Lord of Hosts.''

Haggai and Zechariah were probably among the first exiles who returned with Zerubbabel. From his words in 2:3, it is thought that possibly Haggai himself had seen the glory of Solomon's Temple, in which case he would be an old man at this time [cp. Ezra 3:12], while Zechariah was quite young (Zech 2:4).

The burden of Haggai's message was, ''I am with you, saith the Lord of Hosts'' (Hag 1:13).

To the prophet Haggai is given the privilege-- along with Zechariah-- of stirring the people, by his few concise words, to the work of rebuilding the Temple. His message may be summed up in the words, ''Seek ye first the Kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added unto you'' [Mt 6:33-note].

He uttered [five] short prophecies during the last four months of the second year of Darius. [Each of these prophecies begins with this phrase: ''came the word of the Lord''.]

In the first [and second] [Hag 1:1-2, 3-11], he endeavored to shame the people out of their apathy in beautifying their own houses, while the house of the Lord lay waste; and he tells them that all the drought on crops and cattle had its source in this neglect [cp. Deut 28:1ff]. This prophecy produced the desired effect, and Zerubbabel, the governor of Jerusalem, and Joshua the High Priest, and the residue of the people rose up and began the work of rebuilding the Temple, which had been interrupted by their surrounding enemies, chiefly the Samaritans [cp. Ezra. 3:1-Ezra 6:1ff].

A month later, discouragement seems to have beset the workers, at the contrast between the glory of the former house [ie., the Temple built by Solomon] and the poverty of this latter [house]. Haggai exhorted them to be strong and build, for the Lord was with them, His Spirit would remain among them, and, moreover, a time was coming when the Lord of Hosts would shake the heavens and the earth, and the Desire of all nations [would] come, and His glory [would] fill the Temple, so that the glory of this latter house should be greater than that of the former, and in this place would the Lord of Hosts give peace [Hag 2:1-9].

''Herod's Temple, to which our Lord came, was not a new Temple, but a renovation of this second Temple, with splendid additions and improvements. In Haggai's words, 'The silver is Mine and the gold is Mine, saith the Lord of Hosts,' we probably have a prophecy of its magnificence when adorned, at the cost of many millions, by Herod, so as to make it a glorious house, just before He whose house it was came to it, as it were in preparation for His august presence. Yet, the true glory was the presence of the ''Great King'' in His deep disguise as a peasant of Galilee'' (Rev. James Neil).

A Signet (Note)

The fourth [and fifth] prophecies were addressed to Zerubbabel, and through him to Christ [Hag 2:10-19, 20-23]. Zerubbabel was a prince of the house of David, he had led back the people from captivity, he had built the Temple. In all this, he was a type of Christ, who is the Servant of the Lord, chosen of Him, set as a signet (or seal) upon the hand of the Father, the ''express image of His Person.'' This word in Hebrews 1:3-note means the impression made as by a seal upon wax.

Haggai's message is full of stirring words to us today. If, as a Church, we thought more of the Lord's work of saving souls than of our own comfort, there would be no lack of means to carry it forward.

''Consider your ways,'' said Haggai; if we so adjust our ways as to make them fall into line with God's will for us, we have the certainty of His promise, ''I am with you, saith the Lord of Hosts.'' And if His Spirit remaineth among us, we need fear neither opposition from without, nor discouragement from within. [cp. Mat 28:18-20]

PAUL APPLE
Commentary on Haggai
Well done commentary
Recommended

BIBLE.ORG RESOURCES
Resources that Reference Haggai
on the largest Bible Study Resource on the Web
Hint: Do a "control + find" when you open a "hit" and search Hag as well as the full name.
This may take some practice but is guaranteed to yield some "gems"!
Recommended

ALBERT BARNES
Commentary

ADAM CLARKE
Commentary
critique

BIBLICAL ART
Related to Obadiah

BIBLICAL ILLUSTRATOR
Be a Berean - Not Always Literal
Especially in prophetic passages
Anecdotes, illustrations, etc

STEVEN COLE
Sermons
Flagstaff Christian Fellowship
Conservative, Evangelical, Literal
Recommended

THOMAS CONSTABLE
Expository Notes on Haggai

HINT: Click here to Scroll Bible text synchronized with Constable's notes. Very useful feature!

MARCUS DODS
Haggai
Introduction and Notes
1879

S R DRIVER
Commentary on Haggai
Caveat: Not always literal

EASY ENGLISH
Haggai
Interesting simple translation and comments

ARNOLD FRUCHTENBAUM
Israelology - Commentary on Israel
Note: This resource is listed because it has numerous
commentary notes that relate to the OT Prophetic Books

A C GAEBELEIN
Commentary on Haggai
The Annotated Bible
Conservative, Literal Interpretation
Recommended

The First Address

The Second Address

The Third Address

The Fourth Address

The Fifth Address

JOHN GILL
Commentary on Haggai

JOE GUGLIELMO
Haggai
Sermons and Sermon Notes

DAVID GUZIK
Commentary on Haggai
Conservative, Literal Interpretation

ROBERT HAWKER
Commentary on Haggai

F B HOLE
Commentary on Haggai

H A IRONSIDE
Commentary on Haggai
Recommended
Best "devotional flavor" commentary on the Minor Prophets

PAUL KRETZMANN
Commentary on Haggai

P G MATTHEW
Sermons on Haggai
(Reformed)

EBENEZER HENDERSON
Commentary on Haggai
from "The Book of the Twelve Minor Prophets"
(originally published 1845)

James Rosscup writes "This 1858 work supplies much help on matters of the text, word meaning, resolving some problems, etc. Some have found it one of the most contributive sources in getting at what a text means." (Commentaries for Biblical Expositors: An Annotated Bibliography of Selected Works)

MATTHEW HENRY
Commentary on Haggai
Be cautious (Acts 17:11-note): Does not always interpret the Scripture literally
and sometimes replaces Israel with the Church (note)
(Click example of his interpretative approach which is often allegorical) (Or another example)

HOMILETICAL COMMENTARY
on the Minor prophets
Commentary on Haggai
Multiple Contributors (Spurgeon, Luther, Gurnall, Trapp, etc)
Homiletics , Illustrations
Interesting Resource
Be a Berean - Not Always Literal

JAMIESON, FAUSSET, BROWN
Commentary Critical and Explanatory
on the Whole Bible

Note: JFB is one of the more literal, conservative older commentaries (prior to 1900). Sample excerpt of eschatological (prophetic, apocalyptic) passage Zechariah 14:2 - "gather all nations, etc. — The prophecy seems literal (compare Joel 3:2). If Antichrist be the leader of the nations, it seems inconsistent with the statement that he will at this time be sitting in the temple as God at Jerusalem (2Thessalonians 2:4); thus Antichrist outside would be made to besiege Antichrist within the city. But difficulties do not set aside revelations: the event will clear up seeming difficulties (Ed: Interesting statement!). Compare the complicated movements, Daniel 11:1-45-note." Comment on Zech 14:11 - "no more utter destruction — (Jer 31:40). Literally, “no more curse” (Rev 22:3-note; compare Malachi 4:6-note), for there will be no more sin. Temporal blessings and spiritual prosperity shall go together in the millennium: long life (Isaiah 65:20-22), peace (Isaiah 2:4-note), honor (Isaiah 60:14-16), righteous government (Isaiah 54:14; Isaiah 60:18). (Zechariah 14 - Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible)

S LEWIS JOHNSON
Sermon/Commentary Notes on Haggai
Mp3, Pdf, MS Word, HTML
Conservative, Literal Interpretation

HAMPTON KEATHLEY IV
Commentary Notes on Haggai
Conservative, Literal Interpretation

KEIL AND DELITZSCH
Commentary on the Old Testament
Haggai
See caveat regarding this commentary
Keil and Delitzsch in Pdf

Rosscup - This is the best older, overall treatment of a critical nature on the Old Testament Hebrew text verse by verse and is a good standard work to buy. The student can buy parts or the whole of this series. Sometimes it is evangelical, at other times liberal ideas enter… In prophecy it is amillennial. (Commentaries for Biblical Expositors: An Annotated Bibliography of Selected Works).

Alexander Maclaren
Sermons on Haggai
Who is Alexander Maclaren (1826-1910)?

J VERNON MCGEE
Thru the Bible
Commentary on Haggai
Mp3 Audio
Click to listen or
Right click and select "Save Target as"
Literal, futuristic interpretation
Recommended

MISCELLANEOUS RESOURCES
Commentaries, Sermons, Devotionals
on Haggai

ARTICLES ONLINE

ARTICLES BELOW ARE AVAILABLE ONLINE

PRECEPT MINISTRIES

BEST COMMENTARIES

Rosscup on Kaiser: A careful evangelical gives contemporary outlines usable to pastors. He has occasional illustrations and serious explanation of the text. He is premillennial, as on Zechariah 14, and packs in much expositional help, relating it strategically to life. (Commentaries for Biblical Expositors: An Annotated Bibliography of Selected Works)

James Montgomery Boice - conservative, literal, futuristic - excellent for preaching Rosscup comments: The large, two-column pages contain much good material on the relevance of the words for then and for now, dealing with such topics as love, repentance, and sincerity (Hosea 6). A prolonged contemplation of these pages and an application of their principles will produce substantial Christian growth. The author could improve the work by being more definite sometimes in specifying in what framework God will bless Israel in the future (e.g., Hosea 14). Vagueness such as in Joel 2:1-11, where he says the invader is neither locusts nor a human army, is a drawback. Wordiness and wandering in his discussions is another shortcoming, as in using Joel 2:28 to take off into a long discussion of clericalism. He finds fulfillment of Joel 2:28 at Pentecost, yet it would help to point out some aspects that were (Rosscup)

Exploring the Minor Prophets John Phillips - Rosscup on John Phillips - A respected popular expositor on a number of biblical books here has two introductory chapters, then a chapter of about 20–30 pp. on each prophet (50 on Zech.). Several charts aid readers, and a detailed outline runs before each exposition. The exposition is in general surveys of sections, at times taking a view on a main problem. In Hosea 1:2, he feels that God had Hosea marry an immoral woman but Phillips offers no help on the moral issue. Phillips is premillennial, seeing Israel’s future kingdom blessings as in the millennium after Christ’s Second Coming (Hosea 3:5; Joel 3:14ff; Amos 9:15; Zeph. 3:9ff; Zech 2:10–13; 14:1–21). In Mal. 2:15 he has “one” refer to God making husband and wife into one, and in 4:5 he thinks the Elijah will be fulfilled in one of the two witnesses in Rev. 11. The work helps on broad coverage, and is quite readable for preachers, church teachers, students and lay people wanting a general devotional sweep. (Ibid)

The Books of Haggai and Malachi - New International Commentary on the Old Testament - Pieter A. Verhoef - Rosscup writes that "This is by the Professor of Old Testament, Emeritus, University of Stellenbosch, South Africa. It is conservative and offers much on current literature, introductory matters, and verse by verse content, adeptly explaining the text and flow of thought. He takes issue with W. Rudolph who says in his commentary on Haggai that the book has no relevance at all for the Christian faith (Verhoef, p. vii), and strives to show the significance of both Haggai and Malachi to today. He has interacted with much scholarship within the text and in footnotes. He believes that someone close to Haggai in his day wrote the book with authentic material from Haggai. He upholds the unity of the book, and traces the movement through the verses carefully in relation to its background. He may or may not be premillennial, seeing the fulfillment of prophetical aspects about the temple beyond the Second Advent. He deals at length with many of the problems, giving different views and factors to weigh, as on God’s love and hate (Malachi 1:2–3), “one” in 2:15, the messenger concepts of 3:1, and “Elijah” in 4:4–6." (Commentaries for Biblical Expositors: An Annotated Bibliography of Selected Works)

WIL POUNDS

JAMES GRAY

W J BEECHER

CHRISTIAN FRIEND

CHARLES FEINBERG

GENE GETZ

  • Dr Gene Getz gives brief (5-15') pithy, practical videos by which present powerful principles for life application! Instructions: Click Holman Christian Standard Bible Study Bible. Type in the Scripture and click Video Player Tool in right column for Dr Getz's practical points related to that Scripture.

GRACE INSTITUTE

GREG HERRICK

HOLMAN PUBLISHING

  • Holman Christian Standard Bible - Study Notes - Enter Scripture. The HCSB Study Bible notes are well done and can be accessed in the right panel entitled "STUDY BIBLE NOTES TOOL". Select "Study Bible Notes". To read all the notes on a given chapter click "READ" tab. Very nice!

J HAMPTON KEATHLEY III

JOHN MACARTHUR

  • Haggai -Intro, Date, Setting, Themes, Interpretative Challenges, Outline
  • In a Separate Article the Question is answered: When were the Bible books written?
  • Excerpt: Interpretive Challenges - The most prominent interpretive ambiguity within the prophecy is the phrase “the Desire of All Nations” (Hag 2:7). Although many translations exist, there are essentially only two interpretations. Pointing to “The silver is Mine, and the gold is Mine” (Hag 2:8), as well as to Is. 60:5 and Zech 14:14, some contend that it refers to Jerusalem, to which the wealth of other nations will be brought during the Millennium (cf. Is. 60:11; 61:6). It seems preferable, however, to see a reference here to the Messiah, a Deliverer for whom all the nations ultimately long. Not only is this interpretation supported by the ancient rabbis and the early church, the mention of “glory” in the latter part of the verse suggests a personal reference to the Messiah (cf. Is. 40:5; 60:1; Luke 2:32).

DAVID MALICK

G CAMPBELL MORGAN - makes good fodder for sermon preparation!

J VERNON MCGEE

NIV STUDY BIBLE

WILLIAM G MOOREHEAD

  • Outline Studies - Haggai
  • Excerpt: Hag 2:1-9: The design of the second address is to correct a tendency to discouragement and depreciation which had begun to appear. It is to the same officers and through them to the people. They were peculiarly disposed to discouragement. When the foundations were laid old persons who had seen the first temple wept at the contrast. After the first burst of enthusiasm in the work of rebuilding, there came, as almost always comes in human enterprises, the reaction, the time of flagging interest and waning energy. Haggai set himself to reanimate their drooping spirits and rekindle their fainting ardor. In the latter part of this address, Hag 2:6, 7, the prophet grounds his appeal on the great fact that God will ere long shake heaven, earth, sea, and all nations—a passage quoted in Heb 12:26, 27; and adds, “and the desire of all nations shall come,” or “the things desired of all nations shall come.” It is a difficult phrase, but in view of what is said of it Heb 12:25-29, it must in some way be connected with the kingdom of God and the Messiah. Hab 2:10-19. Instruction, reproof, appeal and promise. Hab 2:20-23. This last address was delivered on the same day as the preceding. It was spoken to Zerubbabel alone and was designed to stimulate that officer to zealous efforts in the good work undertaken. The prophet again refers to the supernatural shaking of earth and sky and kingdoms, but amid it all the prince shall be as a signet, firm and immovable, because chosen of the Lord. This can be no other than the day of the Lord, the day of the Prince Messiah.

WILLIAM ORR

  • Keys to Haggai
  • Excerpt: THEME: Haggai returned with the first expedition led by Zerubbabel, along with Ezra the scribe (Ezra 3:8; Haggai 1:1). Work began on the restoration of the temple, only to run into opposition from former inhabitants of the land. GOD inspired the prophet, who urged the work forward. SPECIAL CHARACTERISTICS: Four messages of Haggai were spoken within a period of only four months. It is possible that Haggai may have personally seen the glory of the temple of Solomon (Hag 2:3). This would have made him a very old man at the time of his prophetic ministry. The messages are exceedingly condensed and perhaps were a summary of that which was given orally. Each time Haggai's name is mentioned, he is called "the prophet" thus emphasizing his important ministry. OUTSTANDING TEACHINGS: Opposition to the work caused the people to leave it and turn to more profitable pursuits. They rationalized that the time had not come for rebuilding. Adorning their homes, propagating their flocks and working their fields occupied their interests. Haggai's impassioned plea roused them again to action. Haggai's first message was in substance that of Matthew 6:33-note. In the second he stressed that the glory of the new temple would be greater than the first. He told them that certain plagues had come on them due to their neglect of the important task, and the last message was specially to Zerubbabel promising him that GOD would destroy the enemy and that His people would endure and prosper. KEY TO UNDERSTANDING: GOD will not be frustrated nor change in His purposes; He uses men to fulfill His plans.

MYER PEARLMAN

  • Through the Bible - Haggai
  • Excerpt: I. First message: the neglect of the second temple's completion (Hag 1:1-15) 1. The excuse for the neglect (Hag 1:1, 2). "The time is not come that the Lord's house should be built." The people were probably waiting for some special revelation from GOD before they would perform what they knew to be their duty. 2. The cause of the neglect - the people's selfishness (Hag 1:3, 4). They did not wait for any special command to build and embellish their own homes. 3. The punishment for the neglect - drought and barrenness (Hag 1:5-11). 4. The repentance for the neglect (Hag 1:12-15). The people set to work on the temple. II. The second message: the glory of the second temple (Hag 2:1-9) 1. The people's discouragement (Hag 2:1-3). Remembering the magnificence of Solomon's temple, the people were evidently discouraged by the thought that the present temple would not equal it in beauty and glory. They knew that it would lack the Shekinah glory that filled the first temple. 2. The Divine encouragement (Hag 2:4-9). The glory of the second temple will be greater than that of the first, declares the Lord, for Messiah Himself, the Lord of glory, will enter it. This was fulfilled at Christ's first coming when He entered the temple (Jn 2:13-25; compare Malachi 3:1). There may be a more complete fulfillment at His second coming. Third message: sacrifice. without obedience (to rebuild the temple) will not sanctify (Hag 2:10-19) 1. A parable (Hag 2:10-14). The lesson contained in these scriptures is as follows: holiness is not contagious, but evil is. The sacrifices offered on the altar were not sufficient to sanctify a land which the disobedience of the people had polluted. Therefore the land was barren. "The faint aroma of sanctity coming from the altar was too feeble to pervade the secular atmosphere of their lives. Haggai argues that Israel's sacrifices for sixteen years had been unclean in God's sight, and had brought them no blessing, because the temple was in ruins." 2. A warning (Hag 2:15-18). The blight upon the land was caused by disobedience. 3. A promise (Hag 2:19). Now that the people have set themselves to the work in earnest, the Lord will bless them. IV. Fourth message: the safety and perpetuity of the house of Israel (Hag 2:20-23) 1. The coming world commotions (Hag 2:20-22). Comparing Haggai 2:6,7 and Hebrews 12:26-28, we see here a reference to the final world upheaval preceding Christ's second coming. 2. The assurance of safety (Hag 2:23). The national disturbances in Zerubbabel's time had perhaps made him fear for the safety of his nation. As a representative of the house of David and an ancestor of the Messiah, he receives a promise of protection and safety for himself and his people. All the nations of the world shall be shaken, but the Jewish nation under Messiah, of whom Zerubbabel is a type, shall be established.

AREND REMMERS

CHARLES R SWINDOLL

  • The Prophet Haggai
  • Excerpt: The prophet Haggai recorded his four messages to the Jewish people of Jerusalem in 520 BC, eighteen years after their return from exile in Babylon (538 BC). Haggai 2:3 seems to indicate that the prophet had seen Jerusalem before the destruction of the temple and the exile in 586 BC, meaning he was more than seventy years old by the time he delivered his prophecies. From these facts, the picture of Haggai begins to come into focus. He was an older man looking back on the glories of his nation, a prophet imbued with a passionate desire to see his people rise up from the ashes of exile and reclaim their rightful place as God’s light to the nations. Haggai’s prophecy came at a time when the people of Judah were extremely vulnerable. They had been humbled by their exile to Babylon, hopeful in their return to their Promised Land, and then so discouraged by opposition in their rebuilding of the temple that they had quit (Ezra 4:24). Now, sixteen years later, with Haggai blaming their lack of food, clothing, and shelter on their failure to rebuild the temple, the Jews were receptive to his message of rebuilding the Lord’s house. (See also Haggai Overview Chart)

JAMES VAN DINE

BOB UTLEY

PAUL VAN GORDER

SERMONS AND COMMENTARIES
ON HAGGAI

BRIAN BELL

RICH CATHERS

W A CRISWELL

DAVID DEAN

Note: Audio Only

EDWARD DENNETT

C J ELLICOTT

RICK EZELL

  • Sermon- Putting First Things First - Haggai
  • Excerpt: E. M. Gray spent his life searching for the one trait all successful people share. His essay entitled "The Common Denominator of Success" revealed successful people's common characteristic was not hard work, good luck, or astute human relations, although these traits were important. The one factor that seemed to transcend all the rest was the habit of putting first things first. He observed, "The successful person has the habit of doing the things failures don't like to do. They don't like doing them either, necessarily. But their disliking is subordinated to the strength of their purpose."

BRUCE GOETTSCHE

GOSPEL COALITION

JAMES GRAY

HAMPTON KEATHLEY IV

KEIL AND DELITZSCH

WILLIAM KELLY

ROBERT J MORGAN

T V MOORE

ROBERT NEIGHBOUR

JAMES NISBET CHURCH PULPIT COMMENTARY

HAMILTON SMITH

MAX I REICH

C H SPURGEON

JOHN STEVENSON

BOB UTLEY

Haggai - Be discerning: Utley is Amillennial and replaces Israel with the Church. Why listed? Because he has interesting grammatical (word and phrase studies) and historical comments.

HAGGAI
BY CHAPTER

JOHN STEVENSON

RAY PRITCHARD

JOHN PIPER

STEPHEN FELKER

DON ROBINSON

W A CRISWELL

JIM BOMKAMP

ROBERT MORGAN

F B MEYER

ALAN CARR

J N DARBY

SERMON BIBLE COMMENTARY

HERBERT WOLF

CHUCK SMITH

EXPOSITOR'S BIBLE

JOHN PIPER

WIL POUNDS

F B MEYER

EUGENE MERRILL
Exegetical Commentary on Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi
Conservative, Literal, Futuristic Interpretation
Excellent-Recommended

Rosscup: Here is an evangelical commentary well-done in 493 pp. Introductions gather much that is most pertinent for expositors. In Hag 2:7, “precious things” are Gentiles’ tributes (Isa. 60:5; 61:6) in the future kingdom. Merrill sees Zech 14 as related to Christ’s Second Advent and the coming of the Messianic Kingdom, in premillennial fashion. Fairly full exegetical detail meets readers verse by verse, yet Merrill’s comments are readable for others than scholars, except the technical notes in special sections will be more for the latter. Problem passages usually draw careful remarks, as in seeing Zech 12:10 as referring to the Lord, and in a future day. (Commentaries for Biblical Expositors: An Annotated Bibliography of Selected Works)


HENRY MORRIS
Defender's Study Bible Notes
on Haggai
Conservative, Literal Interpretation
Recommended

NET BIBLE NOTES
Commentary Notes
on Haggai

NETBible notes are in the right panel. You can also select the tab for "Constable's Notes." As you scroll the Bible text in the left panel, the notes are synchronized and will scroll to the same passage. Also has a nice parallel Bible feature (see Tab = "Parallel"). Select a different Bible translation (see Tab = "Bible"). Open Greek/Hebrew tab. Mouse over shows corresponding English word and has short definition at bottom of right panel.

PHIL NEWTON
Sermons on Haggai
Conservative, Literal Interpretation

OUR DAILY BREAD
Devotionals on Haggai
Radio Bible Class

PETER PETT
Commentary on Haggai

MATTHEW POOLE
Commentary on Haggai

PULPIT COMMENTARY
on Haggai
Caveat - Not always literal and
sometimes replaces Israel with the church

EDWARD B PUSEY
Commentary on Haggai
The Minor Prophets
(originally published 1860)

James Rosscup writes "This work originally appeared in 1860. The present publication is set up in two columns to the page with the text of the Authorized Version reproduced at the top. Scripture references, Hebrew words, and other citations are relegated to the bottom of the page. The work is detailed and analytical in nature. Introduction, background and explanation of the Hebrew are quite helpful. Pusey holds to the grammatical-historical type of interpretation until he gets into sections dealing with the future of Israel, and here Israel becomes the church in the amillennial vein." (Commentaries for Biblical Expositors: An Annotated Bibliography of Selected Works)

C I SCOFIELD
Haggai
Brief Commentary Notes
Conservative, Literal Interpretation

CHARLES SIMEON
Sermon on Haggai
Horae Homileticae
Conservative, Literal Interpretation

NOTE: If you are not familiar with the great saint Charles Simeon see Dr John Piper's discussion of Simeon's life - you will want to read Simeon's sermons after meeting him! - click Brothers We Must Not Mind a Little Suffering (Mp3 even better)

GEORGE A SMITH
Commentary on Haggai
The Expositor's Bible
1903

James Rosscup writes "Though old this is well-written and often cited, with many good statements on spiritual truths. Users will find much that is worthwhile, and sometimes may disagree, as when he sees the Jonah account as allegorical (Ed: See Tony Garland's article on the Rise of Allegorical Interpretation)." (Commentaries for Biblical Expositors: An Annotated Bibliography of Selected Works or Logos Format)

SPEAKER'S COMMENTARY
Commentary on Haggai
Indexed by Chapter and Verse

C H SPURGEON
Devotionals on Haggai
Morning and Evening
Faith's Checkbook

C H SPURGEON
All of Spurgeon's Sermons on Haggai

RAY STEDMAN
Sermons on Haggai
Conservative, Literal Interpretation

JOHN TRAPP
Commentary on Haggai

TODAY IN THE WORD
Devotionals on Haggai
Moody Bible Institute

STEVE ZEISLER
Sermons on Haggai
Conservative, Literal Interpretation

Book

chapter
0
verse
0

DISCLAIMER: Before you "go to the commentaries" go to the Scriptures and study them inductively (Click 3 part overview of how to do Inductive Bible Study) in dependence on your Teacher, the Holy Spirit, Who Jesus promised would guide us into all the truth (John 16:13). Remember that Scripture is always the best commentary on Scripture. Any commentary, even those by the most conservative and orthodox teacher/preachers cannot help but have at least some bias of the expositor based upon his training and experience. Therefore the inclusion of specific links does not indicate that we agree with every comment. We have made a sincere effort to select only the most conservative, "bibliocentric" commentaries. Should you discover some commentary or sermon you feel may not be orthodox, please email your concern. I have removed several links in response to concerns by discerning readers. I recommend that your priority be a steady intake of solid Biblical food so that with practice you will have your spiritual senses trained to discern good from evil (Heb 5:14-note).