Philippians 4:14-18 Commentary

 

 

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Philippians 4:14-18 Commentary

Philippians 4:14  Nevertheless, you have done (2PAAI)  well to share with (AAPMPN) me in my affliction  (NASB: Lockman)

Greek: plen kalos epoiesate (2PAAI) sugkoinonesantes (AAPMPN) mou te thlipsei
Amplified: But it was right and commendable and noble of you to contribute for my needs and to share my difficulties with me. (Amplified Bible - Lockman)
NLT: But even so, you have done well to share with me in my present difficulty.  (
NLT - Tyndale House)
Phillips: Nevertheless I am not disparaging the way in which you were willing to share my troubles. (
Phillips: Touchstone)
Wuest: All the same, you did a beautiful thing when you made yourselves fellow partakers with me in my tribulation. (
Eerdmans
Young's Literal:  but ye did well, having communicated with my tribulation;

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Philippians 4:8-23
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The Epistle to the Philippians Commentary - Excellent  (Or in Pdf)
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Philippians 4:10-20 Enough and To Spare
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Philippians 4:14-20 Filling and Being Filled
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Philippians 4:13-23: God’s Promise to You
Philippians 4:2-7 Peace and Joy
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Philippians 4:10-23 Gifts and Sacrifices

Philippians 4:14 4:14b 4:15 4:15b 4:16
Philippians 4:17 4:18 4:18b 4:18c 4:18d

Philippians 4: Greek Word Studies
Philippians 3:17-4:23 The Presence Of The God Of Peace
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Philippians 4:11 Contentment
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NEVERTHELESS, YOU HAVE DONE WELL TO SHARE WITH ME IN MY AFFLICTION: plen kalos epoiesate (2PAAI) sugkoinonesantes (AAPMPN) mou te thlipsei: (1Ki 8:18; 2 Chr 6:8; Mt 25:21; 3Jn 1:5, 6, 7, 8)  (Php 4:18; 1:7; Ro 15:27; 1Co 9:10,11; Gal 6:6; 1Ti 6:18; Heb 10:34; 13:16)

Nevertheless (4133) (plen) is a marker of contrast, implying the validity of something irrespective of other considerations. Paul uses plen here to restrict his previous statement. In view of Paul's complete reliance upon Christ in him, continually strengthening him in every circumstance, the Philippians might have wondered if they should have even bothered to send him the gift. After all why would one who is self-content (in Christ) need anything? Paul wants the Philippians to know that their gift ("nevertheless") was still very much appreciated. Their gift demonstrated that they had a proper spirit as givers.

Paul's joy in his strength in Christ would not obscure his joy in their loving ministry or take away from his sincere gratitude to them for their sacrifice.

Vincent concurs writhing...

 Lest, in declaring his independence of human aid, he should seem to disparage the Philippians’ gift.

Share with me (4790) (sugkoinoneo from sún = with + koinoneo = to partake, share [word study on related word koinonia]) means to participate in something with someone.

Vine has an interesting comment on sugkoinoneo writing that by using this verb

the apostle does not mean simply that it was a joint contribution on their part, but that they joined with him, making his affliction their own. (Vine, W. Collected writings of W. E. Vine. Nashville: Thomas Nelson )

Vine references as support for his interpretation the passage in Galatians where Paul commands believers to...

Bear (present imperative) one another's burdens (extra heavy loads, which here represent difficulties or problems people have trouble dealing with), and thus fulfill the law of Christ. (Gal 6:2)

Affliction (2347)(thlipsis from thlibo = to crush, press together, squash, hem in, compress, squeeze in turn derived from thláo = to break) (Click in depth study of thlipsis)

Thlipsis - 45x in NT - Matt. 13:21; 24:9, 21, 29; Mk. 4:17; 13:19, 24; Jn. 16:21, 33; Acts 7:10f; 11:19; 14:22; 20:23; Rom. 2:9; 5:3; 8:35; 12:12; 1 Co. 7:28; 2 Co. 1:4, 8; 2:4; 4:17; 6:4; 7:4; 8:2, 13; Eph. 3:13; Phil. 1:17; 4:14; Col. 1:24; 1 Thess. 1:6; 3:3, 7; 2 Thess. 1:4, 6; Heb. 10:33; Jas. 1:27; Rev. 1:9; 2:9f, 22; 7:14

The NAS translates thlipsis as affliction(14), afflictions(6), anguish(1), distress(2), persecution(1), tribulation(16),tribulations(4), trouble(1).

Thlipsis originally expressed sheer, physical pressure on a man. Medically thlipsis was used of the pulse (pressure). It conveys the idea of being squeezed or placed under pressure or crushed beneath a weight. When, according to the ancient law of England, those who willfully refused to plead guilty, had heavy weights placed on their breasts, and were pressed and crushed to death, this was literally thlipsis.

John MacArthur writes that...

"Thlipsis (tribulations) has the underlying meaning of being under pressure and was used of squeezing olives in a press in order to extract the oil and of squeezing grapes to extract the juice...In Scripture the word thlipsis is perhaps most often used of outward difficulties, but it is also used of emotional stress." (MacArthur, J: Romans 1-8. Moody)

Thlipsis pictures one being "crushed" by intense pressure, difficult circumstances, suffering or trouble pressing upon them from without. Thus persecution, affliction, distress, opposition or tribulation, all press hard on one's soul. Thlipsis does not refer to mild discomfort but to great difficulty. In Scripture the thlipsis is most often used of outward difficulties, but it is also used of emotional stress and sorrows which "weighs down" a man’s spirit like the sorrows and burden his heart. Thlipsis then includes the disappointments which can "crush the life" out of the one who is afflicted.

The English word "tribulation" is derived from the Latin word tribulum (literally a thing with teeth that tears), which was a heavy piece of timber with spikes in it, used for threshing the corn or grain. The tribulum was drawn over the grain and it separated the wheat from the chaff. As believers experience the "tribulum" of tribulations, and depend on God’s grace, the trials purify us and rid us of the chaff.

Constable has an interesting note here...

“We know that God loves a cheerful giver, but I believe we also need to stress that God loves a cheerful receiver. Cheerful receivers make giving and receiving a joy. It is especially important that the called workers of the church learn to be gracious, cheerful receivers. This is not necessarily an easy task. The art of being a gracious, cheerful, thankful receiver may be even more difficult than being a cheerful giver. If we learn to accept the compliments and the special personal gifts which we receive in a gracious, cheerful manner, we will help make giving and receiving a joy for ourselves and for our people.” (Philippians Notes)

In sharing with him in his affliction, they did something about his problem, putting their money where their mouth was so to speak.

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F B Meyer has the following comments...
 

FILLING AND FILLED
Phil 4:14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20


THE Apostle had already made it clear, that though for a long interval he had received nothing from the Philippian Church, he did not complain, but realised that there were sufficient reasons which accounted for the cessation of their gifts. He did not deny that he had been straitened in outward circumstances, but he had been content because he discerned the will of God in every dispensation, and was able to do all things in union with the Living Christ. He had found that his legitimate necessities had been met, and that God had dealt with him as with Elijah, to whom the feathered fowl, and the slender resources of the widow of Zarephath, ministered daily provision. He rejoiced, however, that his friends had been able to send again to his necessity, not for his sake alone, but for theirs. It was not that he sought for a gift, but for fruit that might be reckoned to their account.


The Gift and Its Return. No Church had done for Paul what the Philippian Church had. In the early days they had sent once and again to minister to his need; and now their present, forwarded by the hand of Epaphroditus, redounded still further to their credit. It was "an odour of a sweet smell, a sacrifice acceptable, well-pleasing to God." How could he repay them for the gifts they had sent when they were able, and for the desire to send when they were not. It was clear that he must always be hopelessly in debt to them so far as material supplies were concerned, but he could pray and make intercession on their behalf, and remind the Master that all kindness shown to the servant imposed an honourable obligation on the Master, and out of all this arose the assurance that his "God would fulfil every need of theirs according to His riches in glory in Christ Jesus."


"Fulfil." To translate the Greek word as R.V. does by fulfil connects this verse with the preceding one, and brings out the designed and beautiful harmony. The Apostle was filled because he had received from Epaphroditus the gifts of his friends, and now God would fulfil their need. What they had done in the lower sphere for him would be repeated in a higher sphere by God. The measure with which they had meted out their stores for the imprisoned Apostle would be returned to them brimming to the full, not with the supplies for physical need, but with the eternal and unsearchable riches of heaven, which are in Christ Jesus.


Give and Receive. This is a constant law of God's world. "Give, and it shall be given unto you: good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over, shall be given into your bosom. For with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again." Lend your boat for a whole afternoon to Christ that it may be His floating pulpit, and He will return it to you laden with fish. Place your upper room at His disposal for a single meal, and He will fill it and the whole house with the Holy Spirit of Pentecost. Place in His hands your barley loaves and fish, and He will not only satisfy your hunger, but add twelve baskets full of fragments. The Philippians sent three or four presents to a suffering and much needing servant of God, and from that moment they might reckon that every need of theirs would be supplied. Such small acts on our part are recompensed with such vast returns. We scratch the surface of the soil and insert our few little seeds, and within a few months the acreage is covered by a prolific harvest in which a hundredfold is given for every grain which we seemed to throw away.


God's Return to us. God refuses to be in debt to any man. He takes into His exchequer the accounts of all outlay made by His stewards for the relief of need and distress, and He repays with interest. When the Good Samaritan was leaving the village inn, on the morning after the memorable rescue of the wounded traveller, he said to the host, "Take care of him, and what thou spendest more, when I come again, I will repay." Evidently, he was well-known on the road, he had often been at that inn before, and had established his character by honourable and generous treatment. They knew that his word was his bond, and that whatever was expended in reason would secure an ungrudging repayment. And if this be true of man how much more of God. He hands over to us cases in which He is deeply interested, saying as He does so, "Take care of these, expend what is necessary, and I will repay." May we not reckon on God for this? According to our faith it will be to us.


But Give Cheerfully. Whenever, therefore, we feel impelled to make provision for others, let us do it as unto God, not simply out of human pity, but from a deep sense of obligation to our Heavenly Father, let us do it gladly, freely, generously. "God loveth a cheerful giver." Three things will happen,


(1) We shall send a thrill of gratitude into some weary and fainting soul, encouraging it to hope in God because it has found that its hope in man has not been misplaced.


(2) The odor of the act will be fragrant as it steals upward to mingle with the adoration and service of Heaven. There is no longer need to offer propitiatory sacrifices, for they have been done away in view of the sacrifice made by our Lord when He once offered Himself without sin unto God, but there is room in the Christian dispensation for the sacrifice of praise (Heb. 13:15-note), for the living sacrifice of ourselves (Ro 12:1-note), and for the acceptable sacrifices of Christian beneficence which, as this paragraph tells us, are well-pleasing to God.


(3) We may also reckon that He will fill to the brim the measure with which we have meted out for others, and take it as a certainty that He will fulfil every need according to His riches. If our measure was filled with sand grains, He will return it filled with gold dust; if it was filled with pebbles, He will hand it back replete with diamonds; if it contained necessaries for the physical life, He will restore it brimming over with spiritual riches.


Charity Succeeded by Poverty. It may be answered that many who have given lavishly for God's cause have afterwards come to penury and need, and their benefactions seem to have been lost like argosies that go down at sea. In any case, there has been no return to brighten the straitened circumstances of declining years.


Three answers may be given.


First, it may be that the gifts were not rendered with a single eye for the glory of God, but for some lower motives of display, ostentation, or self-advertisement; therefore, they had their reward. They were done to be seen of men, they received the recognition and applause of men, and God refused to recognise any obligation for further recompense.


Secondly, it is necessary, before these laws of the spiritual world operate on our behalf, that we should definitely and by faith appropriate them. There is no promise which does not require to be claimed. As the angel of electricity will not step forth to illumine our rooms unless we turn the switch when we pass through the door, so we must not complain that the laws of the spiritual world do not bring us help unless by faith we appropriate their service. Whenever, therefore, we expend alms for the relief of need, let us definitely put our money into God's bags, which wax not old: we should specifically lay up treasure in heaven, we should pay our money, so to speak, into the bank of His faithfulness, and reckon that there will be a definite return. It may be taken as an axiom that in this world there is a return for every gift that we lay on the altar of self-sacrifice --not of reward but of free grace. We must not make the gift in order to get the reward, but having made the gift in the name of Christ, and for the fulfilment of His redemptive purpose, we may certainly believe that in ways that we may not be able to define God will supply all our need.


Thirdly, it should be borne in mind that though there may be apparent straitness, there may be a wealth of content, a gold mine of peace and joy, the precious stones of spiritual grace, which correspond to the riches in glory of which the Apostle speaks. When life was young, they gave of their temporal things, and now as the evening shades gather, God gives them not temporalities but spiritualities. They sowed carnal things and reap spiritual ones (1Co 9:11).


God's Return. "All your need." From the moment that we draw our first breath in this world to the last sigh of expiring life, we are full of needs. The babe has its cradle needs, and the patriarch those that arise from the wearing out of his faculties, and his growing dependence on others. The body has physical need, the mind its hunger for truth, the heart its insatiable longing for love, the spirit for spiritual sustenance and quickening. Our human nature is one great bundle of need, it is always crying aloud for satisfaction; and as civilisation advances, the variety and multiplicity of our need is ever on the increase.


Needs and Desires. We must distinguish between our needs and our desires. It is possible to want a good many things which we do not need. We often want things which it would injure us greatly to have. Paul wanted to be delivered from his thorn, but his real need was for more grace. We want a great many things which it is not possible for our Heavenly Father to give us, except to the great detriment of our best life. There is no promise that God shall supply all our desires or wishes, there is a certainty that He will fulfil all our need.


Some may read these words whose needs are clamant, the need for guidance, for help against temptation, for the quickening of languishing devotional life, the need for daily bread or employment. Let all such take this to their heart for their comfort that God will supply all their need. "My God shall fulfil every need of yours."


Christ is God's Answer to Our Need. "In Him are all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge hidden." "It pleased the Father that in Him should all the fulness dwell." "In Him dwelleth all the fulness of the Godhead bodily." The Divine-Human nature of Christ is replete with every possible supply for His people. "He filleth all in all." Those that trust Him can say, as the Apostle did of the Philippian gifts, "I have all things and abound; I am filled, hating received from Christ the things that came from God, and which were treasured in Him for my enrichment and thanksgiving." The teaching of the Apostle is full of this thought, as when he says, "I thank my God always concerning you, for the grace of God which was given you in Christ Jesus; that in everything ye were enriched in Him" (1Cor 1:4, 5), and again, "Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ who hath blessed us with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places in Christ" (Eph 1:3-note). Peter also affirms the same thought. "Grace to you, and peace be multiplied in the knowledge of God, and of Jesus our Lord; seeing that His Divine power hath granted unto us all things that pertain unto life and godliness" (2Pet. 1:2-note, 2Pe 1:3-note).


Christ is the complement i.e. the completement of every soul. Just as the dark face of the moon taken with her first crescent of light makes a complete circle, so the unseen Redeemer together with our infinite need makes a complete man after God's stature. The greater our deficiency the larger His supply.


The Prime Necessity. The prime necessity, however, is that we should reckon it is so, and avail ourselves of all the treasures that are prepared for our use in our Risen Lord. Too often we act as if we had to meet the demands of life from our own limited exchequer, instead of believing that we have been taken into partnership with the Son of God, and can at any moment draw upon His all-sufficiency. What would you think if a clerk, who was sent to a distant land to open a branch of some great business firm, were to seek to meet the expenses out of his own limited salary, when the head of the firm had told him to draw upon his credit to any extent which he deemed necessary? But we make the same mistake when we meet the calls of life apart from the boundless wealth which is placed to our credit in Jesus.


A story is told by Dr. Richard Newton of an old and poverty-stricken Indian, who many years ago made his way into a Western settlement in search of food to keep him from starving. A bright-coloured ribbon was seen around his neck, from which there hung a small, dirty pouch. On being asked what it was, he said it was a charm given him in his younger days. He opened it, and took out a worn and Crumpled paper, which he handed to the person making the inspection. It proved, on examination, to be a regular discharge from the federal army, signed by George Washington himself, and entitling him to a pension for life. Here was a man with a promise duly signed, which if presented in the right place would have secured him ample provision, yet he was wandering about hungry, helpless, and forlorn, and begging bread to keep him from starving. What a picture of many Christians who are in need of everything when they might be rich and full! Perhaps their own life had not been generous, certainly their faith has never put in its claim to God's great bank of promise.


We deal with a Father. Let us remember that we are dealing with a Father. "Now unto our God and Father be the glory for ever." The Father's eye is on His children, and a Father's hand is stretched out to their relief. Let us be of good cheer. Two sparrows are sold for a farthing, but five for two farthings, that is, sparrows are so cheap that one can be thrown into the bargain, but that odd sparrow cannot fall to the ground without the notice of the Father. Surely we are of more value than many sparrows, and we may count on Him with absolute certainty. Nowhere in the world does He make birds, fish, young lions, or babes, without supplying the food which He has taught them to require. He cannot do worse by us; we dare not think that He had implanted needs which He is unable and unwilling to meet. Only let us make Him our confidant, going through life with a free-handed generosity that gives, and with an absolute trust which takes, making our requests known unto Him, and receiving the fulfilment of every need, out of which shall arise to Him who loves us, cares for us, and sustains us, glory unto the ages of the ages. The grace of God, and if He loves, there must be something lovable upon which our hearts can fasten. (
F. B. Meyer. The Epistle to the Philippians - A Devotional Commentary)

 

Philippians 4:15   You yourselves also know  (2SRAI) , Philippians, that at the first preaching of the gospel, after I left Macedonia, no church shared (3SAAI) with me in the matter of giving and receiving but you alone (NASB: Lockman)

Greek Oidate (2SRAI) de kai humeis, Philippesioi, hoti en arche tou euaggeliou, hote exelthon apo Makedonias, oudemia moi ekklesia ekoinonesen (3SAAI) eis logon doseos kai lempseos ei me humeis monoi
Amplified: And you Philippians yourselves well know that in the early days of the Gospel ministry, when I left Macedonia, no church (assembly) entered into partnership with me and opened up [a debit and credit] account in giving and receiving except you only. (Amplified Bible - Lockman)
Lightfoot: But, though I am thus indifferent to my own wants, I commend you for your sympathy and aid in my affliction. I need not remind you, my Philippian friends; you yourselves will remember that in the first days of the Gospel, when I left Macedonia, though I would not receive contributions of money from any other church, I made an exception in your case.
NLT: As you know, you Philippians were the only ones who gave me financial help when I brought you the Good News and then traveled on from Macedonia. No other church did this. (
NLT - Tyndale House)
Phillips: You Philippians will remember that in the early days of the Gospel when I left Macedonia, you were the only church who shared with me the fellowship of giving and receiving. (
Phillips: Touchstone)
Wuest: But you yourselves also know, Philippians, that at the beginning of the good news, when I went out from Macedonia, not even one assembly made itself a partner with me as regards an account of giving and receiving except you only, (
Eerdmans
Young's Literal: and ye have known, even ye Philippians, that in the beginning of the good news when I went forth from Macedonia, no assembly did communicate with me in regard to giving and receiving except ye only;

AND YOU YOURSELVES ALSO KNOW PHILIPPIANS THAT AT THE FIRST PREACHING OF THE GOSPEL AFTER I DEPARTED FROM MACEDONIA NO CHURCH SHARED WITH ME IN THE MATTER OF GIVING AND RECEIVING BUT YOU ALONE: Oidate (2SRAI) de kai humeis, Philippesioi, hoti en arche tou euaggeliou, hote exelthon apo Makedonias, oudemia moi ekklesia ekoinonesen (3SAAI) eis logon doseos kai lempseos ei me humeis monoi:   (Macarthur Php4:14-19)

And you Philippians yourselves well know that in the early days of the Gospel ministry, when I left Macedonia, no church (assembly) entered into partnership with me and opened up [a debit and credit] account in giving and receiving except you only. (Amplified Bible - Lockman)

You yourselves know - Paul by recalling their former kindness confirms his appreciation of their present help. In other words he is saying that this is no new thing for you have always been generous.

They were the only church that had shared financially with Paul in his pressing circumstances and they had done so despite their own poverty.

With the statement "First preaching of the gospel" Paul digresses to 10 years earlier at the time of is initial encounter with his readers, when God used his preaching of the Gospel to birth the "First Church of Philippi".

Preaching of the Gospel (2098) (euaggelion from = good + aggéllo = proclaim, tell) (Click in depth study) originally referred to a reward for good news and later became the good news itself. The word euaggelion was in just as common use in the first century as our words good news today.  “Have you any good news for me today?” would have been a common question. In this secular use euaggelion described good news of any kind and prior to the writing of the New Testament, had no definite religious connotation in the ancient world until it was taken over by the "Cult of Caesar" which was the state religion and in which the emperor was worshipped as a god. The writers of the New Testament adapted the term as God's message of salvation for lost sinners.

Euaggelion - 76x in the NT - Matt. 4:23; 9:35; 24:14; 26:13; Mk. 1:1, 14f; 8:35; 10:29; 13:10; 14:9; 16:15; Acts 15:7; 20:24; Rom. 1:1, 9, 16; 2:16; 10:16; 11:28; 15:16, 19; 16:25; 1 Co. 4:15; 9:12, 14, 18, 23; 15:1; 2 Co. 2:12; 4:3f; 8:18; 9:13; 10:14; 11:4, 7; Gal. 1:6f, 11; 2:2, 5, 7, 14; Eph. 1:13; 3:6; 6:15, 19; Phil. 1:5, 7, 12, 16, 27; 2:22; 4:3, 15; Col. 1:5, 23; 1 Thess. 1:5; 2:2, 4, 8f; 3:2; 2 Thess. 1:8; 2:14; 1 Tim. 1:11; 2 Tim. 1:8, 10; 2:8; Philemon 1:13; 1 Pet. 4:17; Rev. 14:6

The NAS renders euaggelion as made a proclamation(1), preach(16), preached(10), preacher(1), preaches(2), preaching(11),proclaim(8), proclaimed(6), proclaiming(6).

I departed from Macedonia refers to Paul's first European circuit, when he went by way of Athens to Corinth, where he was joined by Silvanus and Timothy, bringing a contribution from Macedonia. (Acts 18:5; 2 Cor. 11:9).

Church (1577) (ekklesia from ek = out + kaleo = call) literally "called-out ones" and implies an "assembly". Ekklesia was used by the Greeks for their assembly of citizens "called out" to transact the business of the city or to discuss the affairs of State. Ekklesia in the NT describes a living organism, composed of living members joined together; through which Christ lives and works, carrying out His Kingdom purposes on earth. The giving by the Philippian saints was a reflection of Christ living His life out through this local, dynamic body of believers. May their tribe increase in these last days. Amen.

Ekklesia - 114x in the NT - Matt. 16:18; 18:17; Acts 5:11; 7:38; 8:1, 3; 9:31; 11:22, 26; 12:1, 5; 13:1; 14:23, 27; 15:3f, 22, 41; 16:5; 18:22; 19:32, 39f; 20:17, 28; Rom. 16:1, 4f, 16, 23; 1 Co. 1:2; 4:17; 6:4; 7:17; 10:32; 11:16, 18, 22; 12:28; 14:4f, 12, 19, 23, 28, 33ff; 15:9; 16:1, 19; 2 Co. 1:1; 8:1, 18f, 23f; 11:8, 28; 12:13; Gal. 1:2, 13, 22; Eph. 1:22; 3:10, 21; 5:23ff, 27, 29, 32; Phil. 3:6; 4:15; Col. 1:18, 24; 4:15f; 1 Thess. 1:1; 2:14; 2 Thess. 1:1, 4; 1 Tim. 3:5, 15; 5:16; Philemon 1:2; Heb. 2:12; 12:23; Jas. 5:14; 3 Jn. 1:6, 9f; Rev. 1:4, 11, 20; 2:1, 7f, 11f, 17f, 23, 29; 3:1, 6f, 13f, 22; 22:16

The NAS renders ekklesia as assembly(3), church(74), churches(35), congregation (2).

As stated above, "the church" is not a building or an organization or a creed but is in essence an organism, the Body of Christ (Eph 4:12-note, Col 1:18-note), with Christ as the Head of the Body (Col 1:18-note, Eph 1:22, 23-note), and individual members of His Body, the Church composed of men and women called out of the domain of darkness (Col 1:13-note) by God from every tribe and tongue and people and nation (Rev 5:9-note, out of darkness - 1Pe 2:9-note) unto salvation. I believe that only regenerate (Titus 3:5-note) men and women, both Jew and Gentile (Eph 3:6, "formerly far off" = Gentiles Eph 2:13, 14-note, Ep 2:15, 16-note, Ep 2:17, 18-note, cp Gal 3:28, 29), compose the true church and that the true church does not include unsaved individuals (Acts 2:41, 47). Jesus predicted the church in (Mt 16:18), and Pentecost was the inception of the church (Acts 2:1, 2, 3, 4ff). The church at its inception was composed of Jews but Gentiles later became "fellow citizens with the saints, and are of God's household, having been built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Christ Jesus Himself being the Corner Stone in Whom the whole building, being fitted together is growing into a holy temple in the Lord in Whom you also are being built together into a dwelling of God in the Spirit (Eph 2:19, 20, 21, 22-note). I believe that the NT Scriptures also teach that "church" can refer to a local assembly of believers (eg, Col 4:15,16-note, cp Acts 2:42, 14:23, Re 1:4-note). The church is the bride of Christ, which will live and reign with Him throughout all eternity (Ep 5:31-note, Ep 5:32-note; Rev 19:7-note). The church is entrusted with the mission of world evangelization during this age (Mt 28:19, 20; Acts 1:8).

Shared (2841) (koinoneo from koinos = common, shared by all) means literally to share one's possessions with the implication of some kind of joint participation and mutual interest. This Greek word was used in a marriage contract where the husband and wife agree to a joint-participation in the necessaries of life.

The things that are "shared" in the NT include needs of other believers (Ro 12:13-note), spiritual things (Romans 15:27-note), good things with one's teacher (Ga 6:6), giving to the work of missions (Php 4:15), responsibility in another's sins (! 1Ti 5:22), of Christ participating (sharing or taking part) in our humanity (He 2:14-note), of believers who experience the suffering for the sake of Christ (1Peter 4:13-note), in evil deeds (2Jn 1:11).

The key idea in the word is that of a partnership, a possessing things in common, a belonging in common to. The saints at Philippi were in a glorious spiritual partnership with the great apostle Paul in spreading the Gospel of Jesus Christ! Believers have the same opportunity today as they pray for and give generously to missionaries taking the gospel to the thousands of hidden people groups. Are you sharing in the eternal endeavor? Don't pass up the once in a lifetime opportunity!

There are 8 uses of koinoneo in the NT and is rendered (in the NAS) as contributing(1), participates(1), share(4), shared(2)...

Romans 12:13-note contributing to the needs of the saints, practicing hospitality.


Romans 15:27-note Yes, they were pleased to do so, and they are indebted to them. For if the Gentiles have shared in their spiritual things, they are indebted to minister to them also in material things.


Galatians 6:6 And let the one who is taught the word share all good things with him who teaches.


Philippians 4:15 And you yourselves also know, Philippians, that at the first preaching of the gospel, after I departed from Macedonia, no church shared with me in the matter of giving and receiving but you alone;


1Timothy 5:22 Do not lay hands upon anyone too hastily and thus share responsibility for the sins of others; keep yourself free from sin.


Hebrews 2:14-note  Since then the children share in flesh and blood, He Himself likewise also partook of the same, that through death He might render powerless him who had the power of death, that is, the devil;


1Peter 4:13-note but to the degree that you share the sufferings of Christ, keep on rejoicing; so that also at the revelation of His glory, you may rejoice with exultation.


2Jn 1:11 for the one who gives him a greeting participates in his evil deeds.

Paul used the noun form Koinonia in the first chapter writing...

in view of your participation (koinonia) in the gospel from the first day until now. (see note Philippians 1:5)

Koinonia in that verse signifies joint participation and co-operation in the gospel, through financial support and prayer support. The Philippians were fellow laborers or co-laborers with Paul to take the whole Word to the whole world. Immediately upon becoming Christians and continually thereafter, the Philippians had dedicated themselves to living and proclaiming the truth about Jesus Christ, and specifically to helping Paul in his ministry. (cf Lydia - Acts 16:15).

Koinoneo is used 4 times in the non-apocryphal Septuagint (LXX) 2Chr 20:35; Job 34:8; Pr 1:11; Eccl 9:4.

Giving (1394) (dosis from dídomi = to give) refers to a gift.

Today's English Version renders it...

you were the only ones who shared my profits and losses.

Receiving (3028) (lepsis from lambáno = to receive) refers to a receipt or to the act of receiving.

Giving and receiving together picture a ledger with a credit and debit page. The implication is that Paul evidently was a careful steward of his resources and kept an account of his receipts and expenditures.

Matter (3056) (logos) was sometimes used as a business term and in the NT is translated as “accounts” (Mt 18:23; 25:19) or “accounting” (cf Luke 16:2). This is Paul's meaning in the present context.

The Philippians kept a ledger in which they recorded the good things received from Paul on the credit page, and the debt they owed Paul on the debit side. He acknowledged the receipt of their gift in the words, "I have all," using a business term meaning, "I have received in full" (Php 4:18).

The word "abound" in Php 4:17, is taken from the money market. It was used of the accumulation of interest.

 

Philippians 4:16  for even in Thessalonica you sent  (2PAAI) a gift more * than once for my needs (NASB: Lockman)

Greek hoti kai en Thessalonike kai hapax  kai dis eis ten chreian moi epempsate. (2PAAI)
Amplified: For even in Thessalonica you sent [me contributions] for my needs, not only once but a second time. (Amplified Bible - Lockman)
Lightfoot: Nay, even before I left, when I was still at Thessalonica, you sent more than once to supply my wants.
NLT: Even when I was in Thessalonica you sent help more than once. (
NLT - Tyndale House)
Phillips:   Even in Thessalonica you twice sent me help when I was in need.  (
Phillips: Touchstone)
Wuest: that even in Thessalonica more than once you sent to relieve my necessity. (
Eerdmans
Young's Literal: because also in Thessalonica, both once and again to my need ye sent;

FOR EVEN IN THESSALONICA YOU SENT A GIFT MORE THAN ONCE FOR MY NEEDS: hoti kai en Thessalonike kai hapax kai dis eis ten chreian moi epempsate. (2PAAI):  (Macarthur on Php 4:14-19)

Even in Thessalonica - see Acts 17:1-15

The Greek literally reads "because also in Thessalonica, both once and again to my need you sent". Note that the NASB adds the word "gift" for continuity, but it is not present in the original Greek text.

Needs (5532) (chreia from chréos = debt) refers to that which is a lack of something requisite, desirable, or useful. Chreia means to have need of someone or something (Mt 3:14, Mk 2:25). It can speak of the necessities of life (Acts 20:34). In Eph 4:29 (note) chreia refers to an individuals "needs" (more in a figurative sense or psychological, spiritual sense rather than a physical sense).

Chreia - 49x in the NT - Matt. 3:14; 6:8; 9:12; 14:16; 21:3; 26:65; Mk. 2:17, 25; 11:3; 14:63; Lk. 5:31; 9:11; 10:42; 15:7; 19:31, 34; 22:71; Jn. 2:25; 13:10, 29; 16:30; Acts 2:45; 4:35; 6:3; 20:34; 28:10; Rom. 12:13; 1 Co. 12:21, 24; Eph. 4:28, 29; Phil. 2:25; 4:16, 19; 1 Thess. 1:8; 4:9, 12; 5:1; Tit. 3:14; Heb. 5:12; 7:11; 10:36; 1 Jn. 2:27; 3:17; Rev. 3:17; 21:23; 22:5.

The NAS renders chreia as necessary(1), need(40), needed(1), needs(6), task(1).

Dwight Pentecost notes that...

The strange thing in this passage is that the apostle is not commending the Philippians because they met his need; he is commending them because they have satisfied a need of their own of which they seem to have been entirely ignorant. Since the apostle had nothing, we would suppose that he would thank them because of what their gift did for him. But he barely mentions that. His thanksgiving goes to God because through the gift they have satisfied a need which they have. The apostle points out that this is not the first time the Philippians contributed to his needs. They did so on at least two previous occasions. (Pentecost, J. D. The Joy of Living: A Study of Philippians. Kregel Publications)

 

Philippians 4:17  Not that I seek (1SPAI) the gift itself, but I seek (1SPAI) for the profit which increases (PAPMSA) to your account  (NASB: Lockman)

Greek ouch hoti epizeto (1SPAI) to doma, alla epizeto (1SPAI) ton karpon ton pleonazonta (PAPMSA) eis logon humon
Amplified: Not that I seek or am eager for [your] gift, but I do seek and am eager for the fruit which increases to your credit [the harvest of blessing that is accumulating to your account]. (Amplified Bible - Lockman)
Lightfoot: Again I say, I do not desire the gift, but I do desire that the fruits of your benevolence should redound to your account.
NLT: I don't say this because I want a gift from you. What I want is for you to receive a well-earned reward because of your kindness. (
NLT - Tyndale House)
Phillips:  It isn't the value of the gift that I am keen on, it is the reward that will come to you because of these gifts that you have made (
Phillips: Touchstone)
Wuest: Not that it is my character to be ever seeking the gift, but I am seeking the fruit which is accumulating to your account. (
Eerdmans
Young's Literal: not that I seek after the gift, but I seek after the fruit that is overflowing to your account;

NOT THAT I SEEK THE GIFT ITSELF: ouch hoti epizeto (1SPAI) to doma :  (Php 4:11; Mal 1:10; Acts 20:33,34; 1Co 9:12, 13, 14, 15; 2Co 11:16; 1Th 2:5; 1Ti 3:3; 1Ti 6:10; Titus 1:7; 1Pe 5:2; 2Pe 2:3,15; Jude 1:11) (Macarthur on Php 4:14-19)

Seek (1934) (epizeteo from epí = intensifies meaning + zeteo = to seek)  means to search for or even to demand. Paul was neither inquiring about a gift nor demanding it.

Epizeteo - 13x in the NT - Matt. 6:32; 12:39; 16:4; Lk. 4:42; 12:30; Acts 12:19; 13:7; 19:39; Rom. 11:7; Phil. 4:17; Heb. 11:14; 13:14.

The NAS renders epizeteo as craves(1), eagerly seek(2), searched(1), searching(1), seek(2), seeking(3), seeks after(1), sought(1), want(1).

By declaring "not (absolute negation) that I seek the gift" Paul is apparently still defending himself against the slanderous assertion that he is using the gospel as a means of making a living. Note that "seek" is in the present tense indicating one's habitual action. As Wuest renders it Paul is saying that it

"Not that it is my character to be ever seeking the gift"

Gift (1390) (doma from didomi = to give) is a present or gift and the word lends greater emphasis to the character of the gift. In this case it is preceded by the definite article in Greek ("to" = the) indicating that this is a specific gift he is referring to.

Wil Pounds writes...

“Not that I seek the gift itself, but I seek for the profit which increases to your account” (v. 17). James Boice writes, “Money that is given to help another Christian is called fruit. Our gifts to others are encouraged by God, noticed by God, and much-desired by Him.” There is a great stewardship principle. The imagery says Thielman, is that of a bank account that receives compounded interest. Paul says, it is “continuously increasing profit for your account.” It pays spiritual dividends in eternity. Paul has in mindd the day we stand before the Lord Jesus Christ and give an account of how we have used His gifts to us. The gifts the Philippians have sent to Paul is for their spiritual advantage. “Their generosity was a concrete demonstration that God was completing the good work that he had started in them when they believed the gospel (1:6),” notes Thielman." (Abide In Christ Ministry)

BUT I SEEK FOR THE PROFIT INCREASES TO YOUR ACCOUNT: alla epizeto (1SPAI) ton karpon ton pleonazonta (PAPMSA) eis logon humon: (Phil 1:11; Micah 7:1; Jn 15:8,16; Ro 15:28; 2Cor 9:9, 10, 11, 12, 13; Titus 3:14) (Pr 19:17; Mt 10:40, 41, 42; 25:34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40; Lk 14:12, 13, 14; Heb 6:10)

Seek (1934) (epizeteo from epí = intensifies meaning + zeteo = to seek)  means to search for and to strive after or long for. Paul was striving for and longing for the fruit to be increasing for the Philippians based on their giving.

Profit (2590) (karpos [word study]) is fruit, in this case speaking of the dividends the Philippians would receive from their grace giving to Paul. Paul is referring to the eternal dividend accruing in their spiritual account in the bank of Heaven. This fruit was the reward God would recompense to them for their generous support of Paul as their "church missionary". (cf Pr 11:24, 25; 19:17; Lk 6:38; 2Co 9:6).

Karpos - 67x in the NT - Matt. 3:8, 10; 7:16ff; 12:33; 13:8, 26; 21:19, 34, 41, 43; Mk. 4:7f, 29; 11:14; 12:2; Lk. 1:42; 3:8f; 6:43f; 8:8; 12:17; 13:6f, 9; 20:10; Jn. 4:36; 12:24; 15:2, 4f, 8, 16; Acts 2:30; Rom. 1:13; 6:21f; 15:28; 1 Co. 9:7; Gal. 5:22; Eph. 5:9; Phil. 1:11, 22; 4:17; 2 Tim. 2:6; 4:13; Heb. 12:11; 13:15; Jas. 3:17f; 5:7, 18; Rev. 22:2

The NAS renders karpos as benefit (2), crop(5), crops(2), descendants*(1), fruit(43), fruitful(1),fruits(4), grain(1), harvest(1), proceeds(1), produce(4), profit(1).

Increases (4121) (pleonazo from pleion =  more) means to cause to increase or superabound and so to be present in abundance or to have plenty (2Pe 1:8-note, Php 4:17). To have more than is necessary or more than enough to meet one's needs (2Co 8:15). To become more and more - in Ro 5:20-note speaking of transgression and sin increasing, in Romans 6:1-note of grace increasing (in his rhetorical rebuttal to those who would seek to turn grace into an opportunity to increase in sin, falsely thinking such conduct was "okay" with God!), of grace spreading or increasing as manifest by giving thanks to God (as an aside, genuine giving of thanks proceeds from an attitude of gratitude in a grace filled/controlled/transformed heart), in 2Th 1:3 speaking of love for one another.

Pleonazo was a term taken from the money market and was used of the accumulation of interest, in this case the interest in the "spiritual account" of the Philippians as a result of their generous giving.

Pleonazo is used 9 times in the NT an is rendered  cause to increase(1), grows greater(1), have too much(1), increase(2), increased(1),increases(1), increasing(1), spreading(1)...
 

Romans 5:20-note - And the Law came in that the transgression might increase; but where sin increased, grace abounded all the more,


Romans 6:1-note  What shall we say then? Are we to continue in sin that grace might increase?


2Corinthians 4:15 For all things are for your sakes, that the grace which is spreading to more and more people may cause the giving of thanks to abound to the glory of God.


2Corinthians 8:15 as it is written, "He who gathered much did not have too much, and he who gathered little had no lack."


Philippians 4:17 Not that I seek the gift itself, but I seek for the profit which increases to your account.


1Thessalonians 3:12-note and may the Lord cause you to increase and abound (
perisseuo) in love for one another, and for all men, just as we also do for you; (Note: Pray for love in your local body so that the God of love fills His people with the desire and power to love one another with grace empowered, Spirit controlled supernatural love, love that surpasses human comprehension! Don't try to artificially "manufacture" it for it will lack the touch of the Supernatural.)


2 Thessalonians 1:3  We ought always to give thanks to God for you, brethren, as is only fitting, because your faith is greatly enlarged, and the love of each one of you toward one another grows ever greater;


2Peter 1:8-note For if these qualities are yours and are increasing, they render you neither useless nor unfruitful in the true knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ.

There are 18 uses of pleonazo in the non-apocryphal Septuagint (LXX) - Ex 16:18, 23; 26:12; Nu 3:46, 48, 49, 51; 9:22; 26:54; 2Sa 18:8; 1Chr. 4:27; 5:23; 2Chr 24:11; 31:5; Ps 50:19; 71:21; Pr. 15:6; Jer 30:19; Ezek 23:32. Here is a representative use (and a great/bold prayer to pray to our Father, although some translations do not see it as a prayer, eg Psalm 71:21NIV, Ps 71:21ESV)...
 

Psalm 71:21 May You increase (Heb - rabah = increase greatly or exceedingly; Lxx = pleonazo) my greatness and turn to comfort me. (Amplified reads -  Increase my greatness (my honor) and turn and comfort me.)

 

Spurgeon comments on this psalm writing that...

 

As a king, David grew in influence and power. God did great things for him, and by him, and this is all the greatness believers want. May we have faith in God, such as these words evince.

And comfort me on every side. As we were surrounded with afflictions, so shall we be environed with consolations. From above, and from all around, light shall come to dispel our former gloom; the change shall be great, indeed, when the Lord returns to comfort us.

Greatness increasing with comfort, and comfort increasing with greatness; very rarely united. George Rogers.

Here is another example of the use of pleonazo in the Septuagint...

 

Proverbs 15:6 Great (Heb = rab = much, many, great; Lxx = pleonazo) wealth is in the house of the righteous, but trouble is in the income of the wicked.

Account (3056) (logos) in this context is used much as we would use the term "bank-account."

The Philippians were in effect storing up for themselves treasure in heaven. (Mt 6:2, 3, 4, 19, 20, 21--See notes on giving Matthew 6:2-4; Matthew 6:19-21)

F B Meyer notes that

Give and Receive...is a constant law of God's world. "Give, and it shall be given unto you: good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over, shall be given into your bosom. For with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again." Lend your boat for a whole afternoon to Christ that it may be His floating pulpit, and He will return it to you laden with fish. Place your upper room at His disposal for a single meal, and He will fill it and the whole house with the Holy Spirit of Pentecost. Place in His hands your barley loaves and fish, and He will not only satisfy your hunger, but add twelve baskets full of fragments. The Philippians sent three or four presents to a suffering and much needing servant of God, and from that moment they might reckon that every need of theirs would be supplied. Such small acts on our part are recompensed with such vast returns. We scratch the surface of the soil and insert our few little seeds, and within a few months the acreage is covered by a prolific harvest in which a hundredfold is given for every grain which we seemed to throw away. (Commentary on Philippians)

 

Philippians 4:18  But I have received (1SPAI) everything in full and have an abundance (1SPAI); I am amply supplied  (1SRPI), having received (AMPMSN) from Epaphroditus what you have sent, a fragrant aroma, an acceptable sacrifice, well-pleasing to God  (NASB: Lockman)

Greek apecho (1SPAI) de panta kai perisseuo; (1SPAI) pepleromai (1SRPI) dexamenos (AMPMSN) para Epaphroditou ta par' humon osmen euodias, thusian dekten, euareston to theo
Amplified: But I have [your full payment] and more; I have everything I need and am amply supplied, now that I have received from Epaphroditus the gifts you sent me. [They are the] fragrant odor of an offering and sacrifice which God welcomes and in which He delights. (Amplified Bible - Lockman)
Lightfoot: For myself, I have now enough of all things. The presents which you sent by Epaphroditus have fully supplied my needs. I welcome them, as the sweet savor of a burnt-offering, as a sacrifice accepted by and well-pleasing to God.
NLT: At the moment I have all I need—more than I need! I am generously supplied with the gifts you sent me with Epaphroditus. They are a sweet-smelling sacrifice that is acceptable to God and pleases him. (
NLT - Tyndale House)
Phillips: Now I have everything I want - in fact I am rich. Yes, I am quite content, thanks to your gifts received through Epaphroditus. Your generosity is like a lovely fragrance, a sacrifice that pleases the very heart of God. (
Phillips: Touchstone)
Wuest: But I have all things to the full and overflowing. I have been filled completely full and at present am well supplied, having received at the hands of Epaphroditus the things from you, a fragrant aroma, a sacrifice acceptable, well-pleasing to God. (
Eerdmans
Young's Literal: and I have all things, and abound; I am filled, having received from Epaphroditus the things from you -- an odour of a sweet smell -- a sacrifice acceptable, well-pleasing to God:

BUT I HAVE RECEIVED EVERYTHING IN FULL AND HAVE AN ABUNDANCE: apecho (1SPAI) de panta kai perisseuo (1SPAI): (Php 4:12; 2 Th 1:3)  (Macarthur on Php4:14-19)

Received (568) (apechomai or apecho from apó = from + écho = have) means to be enough, to be sufficient and as in this case to have received in full. In this specific use apecho is used by Paul in the technical sense "This is my receipt". Apecho was constantly used in secular Greek describing the drawing up a of a receipt. What Paul is saying to them in "business terms" is "you have paid me in full in all respects". Note that in other NT contexts, apechomai has a distinctly different meaning of to have (Lk 15:2) or to produce separation or distance from someone or something (Mt 15:8) and then by figurative extension to avoid contact with as in (Acts 15:29, 1Ti 4:3, 1Th 4:3-note, 1Th 5:22-note, 1Pe 2:11-note)

Apechomai - 19x in the NT - Matt. 6:2, 5, 16; 14:24; 15:8; Mk. 7:6; 14:41; Lk. 6:24; 7:6; 15:20; 24:13; Acts 15:20, 29; Phil. 4:18; 1 Thess. 4:3; 5:22; 1 Tim. 4:3; Philemon 1:15; 1 Pet. 2:11-note

The NAS renders apechomai/apecho as abstain(5), abstaining(1), away(1), have back(1), have in full(3), have received in full(1), it is enough(1), off(1), receiving in full(1), was away(2).

Wuest explains it this way...

And now Paul signs a receipt for the gift they sent him, possibly a bit of apostolic humor. The words “I have” are a rubber-stamp of the first century for, “I give you a receipt for what you sent me,” or “I have received in full.” (Wuest, K. S. Wuest's Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: Studies in the Vocabulary of the Greek New Testament: Grand Rapids: Eerdmans)

Have an abundance (4052) (perisseuo from perissós = abundant) means to superabound or to be in excess. In this verse perisseuo extends the idea of apecho, as if he was not just full but overflowing or superabounding.

Wuest commenting on perisseuo writes that...

The word “abound” (NASB = "abundance") in the Greek speaks of that which exists in superfluity. The Philippian gift must have been generous, and Epaphroditus must have been loaded down. What a demonstration of the work of the Holy Spirit is seen in this act of generosity on the part of these former pagans, performed for one who in origin, training, and religion had been and in some ways was still so different from them, different in a sense which would naturally militate against Paul, Gentiles of the proudest and most exclusive race of antiquity, the intelligentsia of the world, loving one who belonged to a race that was looked down upon and despised. (Ibid)

I AM AMPLY SUPPLIED HAVING RECEIVED FROM EPAPHRODITUS WHAT YOU HAVE SENT A FRAGRANT AROMA AN ACCEPTABLE SACRIFICE WELL-PLEASING TO GOD: pepleromai (1SRPI) dexamenos (AMPMSN) para Epaphroditou ta par' humon osmen euodias thusian dekten euareston to theo: (Phil 2:25,26) (Jn 12:3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8; 2Co 2:15,16; Ep 5:2; Heb 13:16, 20, 21; 1Pe 2:5) (Ro 12:1; 2Co 9:12)

Amply supplied (4137) (pleroo from pleres = full) means to be completely filled, as a net filled with fish or cup filled to brim. Pleroo is used often to describe the fulfilling of God's OT promises and prophecies.

Pleroo is a great NT verb to take a moment and study to see what or who is filled (or fulfilled), what they are filled with (eg, just to "tease" you, contrast Ro 1:29-note and Eph 5:18-note, Acts 13:52, Jn 3:29, 2Ti 1:4-note; 1Jn 1:4, 2Jn 1:12!), how this filling comes about, what the result of filling is, etc.

Note Paul's use of the perfect tense which signifies "I have been filled full and remain in that state"  or  “I have been filled and am still full, supplied and satisfied.” Such was the lasting effect of their gift on Paul!

Pleroo - 86x in the NT - Matt. 1:22; 2:15, 17, 23; 3:15; 4:14; 5:17; 8:17; 12:17; 13:35, 48; 21:4; 23:32; 26:54, 56; 27:9; Mk. 1:15; 14:49; Lk. 1:20; 2:40; 3:5; 4:21; 7:1; 9:31; 21:24; 22:16; 24:44; Jn. 3:29; 7:8; 12:3, 38; 13:18; 15:11, 25; 16:6, 24; 17:12f; 18:9, 32; 19:24, 36; Acts 1:16; 2:2, 28; 3:18; 5:3, 28; 7:23, 30; 9:23; 12:25; 13:25, 27, 52; 14:26; 19:21; 24:27; Rom. 1:29; 8:4; 13:8; 15:13, 14, 19; 2 Co. 7:4; 10:6; Gal. 5:14; Eph. 1:23; 3:19; 4:10; 5:18; Phil. 1:11; 2:2; 4:18, 19; Col. 1:9, 25; 2:10; 4:17; 2 Thess. 1:11; 2 Tim. 1:4; Jas. 2:23; 1 Jn. 1:4; 2 Jn. 1:12; Rev. 3:2; 6:11

The NAS has various and numerous ways of rendering pleroo - accomplish(1), accomplished(1), amply supplied(1), approaching(1), complete(1),completed(3), completing(1), elapsed(1), fill(3), filled(16), fills(1), finished(1), fulfill(5), fulfilled(35), fully carry out(3), fully come(1), fully preached(1), increasing(1), made complete(2), made full(5), make complete(1), make full(1), passed(2), supply(1).

Having received (1209) (dechomai [word study]) means to accept readily, or to receive kindly and so to take to oneself what is presented or brought by another. Paul stresses his appreciation of the kindness both of the church and of Epaphroditus.

Dechomai - 56x in the NT - Matt. 10:14, 40f; 11:14; 18:5; Mk. 6:11; 9:37; 10:15; Lk. 2:28; 8:13; 9:5, 48, 53; 10:8, 10; 16:4, 6f, 9; 18:17; 22:17; Jn. 4:45; Acts 3:21; 7:38, 59; 8:14; 11:1; 17:11; 22:5; 28:21; 1 Co. 2:14; 2 Co. 6:1; 7:15; 8:17; 11:4, 16; Gal. 4:14; Eph. 6:17; Phil. 4:18; Col. 4:10; 1 Thess. 1:6; 2:13; 2 Thess. 2:10; Heb. 11:31; Jas. 1:21

The NAS renders dechomai as accept(2), accepted(3), receive(18), received(11), receives(15), take(3), taken(1),took(1), welcome(1), welcomed(1).

Fragrant (3744) (osme from ozō = to smell; English = ozone) is a smell or odor.

Osme - 6x in the NT - Jn. 12:3; 2 Co. 2:14, 16; Eph. 5:2; Phil. 4:18

Osme is used 46x in the non-apocryphal Septuagint (LXX) most often to describe a "soothing aroma" to the Lord, which parallels Paul's use of osme as fragrant  to describe the saint's sacrificial giving!!! Have you ever pondered that your giving to the work of Jehovah as motivated by His Spirit produces a soothing aroma before His throne in heaven? Does this precious word picture not cause you to desire to be given more opportunities to give to Him and His people and His supernatural Kingdom work?! What an awesome God we serve that we as redeemed sinners (who are now saints) are given the holy privilege of offering up acceptable sacrifices to the incomprehensible God (Play Indescribable; Indescribable #2; How Great Is Our God) and that these offerings are truly pleasing and "pleasantly aromatic" to Him, all made possible by and through the greatest sacrificial gift of Christ Jesus, our Great High Priest! Here are the Lxx uses of osme that you might want to meditate on in an attitude of worship and thanksgiving -- Gen. 8:21; Exod. 29:18, 25, 41; Lev. 1:9, 13, 17; 2:2, 9, 12; 3:5, 11, 16; 4:31; 6:15, 21; 8:21, 28; 17:4, 6; 23:13, 18; Num. 15:3, 5, 7, 10, 13f, 24; 18:17; 28:2, 6, 8, 13, 24, 27; 29:2, 6, 8, 11, 13, 36; Ezr. 6:10; Ezek. 6:13; 16:19; 20:28, 41; Dan. 2:46; 4:1

Aroma (2175) (euodia)  fragrance, sweet odor and  metaphorically as here of sacrifices pleasing to God, specifically the material assistance sent to Paul by the Philippians.

Euodia - 3x in the NT - 2 Co. 2:15; Eph. 5:2; Phil. 4:18

Fragrant aroma is an image that moves us from the business world of accounting to the religious world of the priest and obviously is used by Paul to describe their material gift to God. It is worth noting that the same terms are used to describe Christ’s sacrificial death in Ephesians, Paul writing for the saints at Ephesus to...

walk in love, just as Christ also loved you, and gave Himself up for us, an offering and a sacrifice to God as a fragrant aroma. (Ephesians 5:2)

Vine commenting on an odor of a sweet smell writes that...

the phrase is used in the Septuagint (LXX) for the Hebrew savor of rest especially of the burnt (or ascending) offering, e.g., Leviticus 1 and 2, but also of the peace offering, Leviticus 3 and sin offering (Lev 4). The idea of free will and self-dedication was not altogether absent from the burnt offering (though this is not to be gathered from Lev. 1:3, for the phrase there is not “of his own voluntary will,” a.v., but “for his acceptance”)...

The offerings of believers, such as the gifts of the church at Philippi to Paul, ascend to God as an odor of a sweet smell, in the savor of the sacrifice of Christ (though they have nothing to do with the removal of guilt as His expiatory offering had), and this is suggested by the fact of the identical terms in Ephesians 5:2 and Philippians 4:18. The free-will character of the offerings is common to both. The gifts of believers are as the fragrance of incense in their acceptance with God. (Vine, W. Collected writings of W. E. Vine. Nashville: Thomas Nelson)

Acceptable (1184) (dektos from dechomai - see above at "received") means one of whom there is or has been a favorable decision of the will. Dektos was particularly used of the sacrifice although not to distinguish it from unacceptable sacrifices, but to specify it as the object of divine approval.

The important principle for saints to remember is that whether or not an offering is really acceptable and well-pleasing to God depends on the motive of the one who brings it. Lowell phrases it poetically as...

Not what we give but what we share,
For the gift without the giver is bare
.”

Sacrifice (2378) (thusia from thúo = to sacrifice) is literally that which is offered as a sacrifice. Here thusia is used metaphorically to describe their service of giving. It was a sacrifice to God and since they were financially poor, it was given "sacrificially"!

In the Old Testament there were two types of sacrifices, the first offered to deal with sin and the broken fellowship that resulted from the sin. The sacrificial blood was a picture of the bridging of the gap between the giver and God (although OT sacrifices for sin only covered over for a time, whereas Christ's sacrifice effectively and permanently removed all guilt of sin for those who believe in Him).

The second type of OT sacrifice was presented to God as an act of worship, the presenter having had his sins covered over by the blood of the sin offering, which resulted in his hearts being full of thanksgiving and praise to God which was reflected in the offering. It is this second type of "sacrifice" for which Paul is commending the Philippians. The writer of Hebrews has a parallel passage writing that...

Through Him (Christ, our Great High Priest) then, let us continually offer up a sacrifice of praise to God, that is, the fruit of lips that give thanks to His Name. And do not neglect doing good and sharing (which is exactly what the saints at Philippi had done!); for with such sacrifices God is pleased. (Hebrews 13:15-16)

Note also that in the Old Testament sacrificial system, every sacrifice was to provide a fragrant aroma and be acceptable to God. Only if the individual offered it up with the correct heart attitude would it be pleasing to God. And so we read that after the flood and their arrival on dry land...

Then Noah built an altar to the LORD, and took of every clean animal and of every clean bird and offered burnt offerings on the altar and the LORD smelled the soothing aroma; and the LORD said to Himself, "I will never again curse the ground on account of man, for the intent of man's heart is evil from his youth; and I will never again destroy every living thing, as I have done." (Genesis 8:20-21) (cf Lev 1:9,13,17).

In Exodus a parallel passage states...

And you shall offer up in smoke the whole ram on the altar; it is a burnt offering to the LORD: it is a soothing aroma, an offering by fire to the LORD. (cf  Ex 29:18).

Paul is saying that the Philippians’ gift was a spiritual sacrifice, which is what he exhorted the saints at Rome to pursue writing...

I urge you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies a living and holy sacrifice, acceptable (euarestos) to God, which is your spiritual service of worship. (see note on Romans 12:1, cf 1Pe 2:5-note)

Well pleasing (2101) (euarestos from eu = well + arésko = please) describes that which causes someone to be pleased or something which is well approved, eminently satisfactory, or extra-ordinarily pleasing. What the saints at Philippi did to help Paul and his mission was eminently satisfactory and extra-ordinarily pleasing service to God (cf. Ge 8:21; Ex 29:18; Lev 1:9, 13; Ezek 20:41).

Euarestos -  9x in the NT - Ro 12:1, 2; 14:18; 2 Co. 5:9; Ep 5:10; Php 4:18; Col 3:20; Titus 2:9; He 13:21.

The NAS renders euarestos as acceptable(3), pleasing(2), well-pleasing(3), which is pleasing(1).

The KJV Commentary adds that...

The Philippians’ stewardship was a barometer of their spiritual condition. One can give without loving, but he cannot love without giving. Love takes the stew out of stewardship. The love gift pleased God, relieved Paul, and enriched the Philippians. (Dobson, E G, Charles Feinberg, E Hindson, Woodrow Kroll, H L. Wilmington: KJV Bible Commentary: Nelson)

Dwight Pentecost has a practical summation of Philippians 4:14-18 writing that...

We are responsible before God for the use of every material thing that God puts into our hands. We are not only responsible for the surplus, we are responsible for every penny. Our material goods are to be used under the control of the Spirit of God, so that the saints’ needs might be met, and the servants’ needs might be met, and God might be satisfied as we give sacrifices acceptable and well-pleasing to God. I trust that God may give such an attitude toward the material things He has given to us, that we shall no longer divide them into “His” and “ours” but recognize that they all belong to Him and that we are stewards of what He has entrusted to us, so that we might use them to the glory of His name.  (Pentecost, J. D. The Joy of Living: A Study of Philippians. Kregel Publications)

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In Our Daily Walk F B Meyer has the following devotional entitled "Rich Toward God"...

LET US never forget this wonderful assertion, that life consists not in what we possess, but in what we are; not in goods, but in goodness; not in things, but qualities. "How much was he worth?" we ask when a man dies, and we expect an answer in the amount that stood to his credit, and on which his estate must pay death duties. Yet surely a man is worth only the love, humility, generosity, and sweet reasonableness which characterize him. Take away some people's wealth, and, as in the case of the rich man of whom our Lord speaks in His parable, you have nothing left; but take away all things from St. John or St. Paul, from St. Francis or Augustine, or Wesley, and you have an abundance left which makes them the millionaires of all time! "Poor, yet making many rich; having nothing, and yet possessing all things."

The rich man in the parable made three foolish mistakes. First, he treated his wealth as though it were absolutely his own. There is no suggestion that he had made it wrongfully. His wealth had evidently accrued as the gift of prolific harvests, and was certainly due to the goodness of the Creator, on whose co-operation the results of husbandry evidently depend. But to lift up grateful eyes in thankful acknowledgment to God seems never to have occurred to him! Are we not all too prone to magnify our own shrewdness and aptitude, and to exclude God when we make up our accounts for the year.

Second, he thought that the best receptacle for his overplus was in barns, and forgot that there were multitudes of poor and needy souls around. When we begin to accumulate more than we need for our use, or the provision for our families, we should consider, not further investments, but the pressing need of others.

Third, he thought that goods could stay the hunger of the soul How often has the heart of man or woman been surfeited with goods and remained unsatisfied? Let us give, expecting nothing again, with full measure, pressed down, and running over; give, not only money, but love and tenderness and human sympathy; give as one who is always receiving from the boundless resources of God.

PRAYER - Help us, O God, to set our affections on things above, not on things on earth, for nothing beneath these skies can satisfy the hearts which Thou hast made for Thyself. AMEN.

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A NOTE OF THANKS - I was rummaging through some old files the other day when I ran across a big envelope full of treasures -- a collection of thank-you notes from my students during the last year I taught in high school. They brought back some cherished memories. Reading them reminded me of the importance of letting people know how much they are appreciated. Thank-you notes afford us the opportunity to make permanent our feelings of gratitude for our friends or loved ones.

The apostle Paul sent a thank-you note to the Christians in Philippi. They were the only church that had supported him financially on his missions trip (Phil. 4:15), and he wanted to say thanks. But he did more. He told the people specifically what good they had done by helping him. Through Paul, the people reached out to places they could never visit. They met Paul's necessities (Phil 4:16). Their gifts bore spiritual fruit (v27). They pleased God (Phil 4:18). And they received the promise of God's provision for them (Phil 4:19).

Thank-you notes work both ways. They help the sender to express appreciation, and they help the recipient to know what he has done to assist. It's a great combination. 

Does someone you know deserve a note of thanks? -- J. David Branon (Copyright RBC Ministries, Grand Rapids, MI. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved)

Consider what the Lord has done
Through those who've shown you love;
Then thank them for their faithful deeds,
For blessings from above. -- Sper

A word of encouragement can make the difference between giving up and going on.

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