Deuteronomy 1 Resources


Deuteronomy by Irving Jensen- used by permission
deut
Source: Ryrie Study Bible

Deuteronomy

Dt 1:1-4:43 Dt 4:44-26:19 Dt 27:1-34:12

Moses'
First
Discourse

Moses'
Second
Discourse

Moses'
Third
Discourse

Historical Review Legal
Exposition
Prophetical
Promises

Looking Back

40 Years

Looking Up
What God
Expected of Israel
Looking Ahead
What God
Will Do for Israel
Recapitulation of Wanderings Rehearsal
of Israel's Law
Ratification
of Israel's Covenant
Historical Appendices
Remembrance of the past Commandments
for the Present
Dt 27:1-30:20
Blessing and Cursing
Dt 31:1-34:12
Death of Moses
Take Heed
Don't forget
Ten
Commands
Related
Commands
Two Choices Affecting
the Future
Moses' Parting Words
Dt 1:1-4:43
Looking Back
Dt 4:44-11:32
Exposition of Decalogue
Dt 12:1-16:17
Ceremonial Laws
Dt 16:18-20:20
Civil
Laws
Dt 21:1-26:19
Social
Laws
Dt 27:1-28:68
Ratification of Covenant
Dt 29:1-30:20
Terms of Covenant
Dt 31:1-34:12
Moses' Song, Blessing, Death

Plains of Moab

ca. 2 Months
Moses: Author

(Except Dt 34)

Key Words (NAS95):

  • Heart (49x/45v),
  • Love (24x/23v),
  • Listen (31x/31v),
  • Obey/obedient (15x),
  • Observe (26x),
  • Keep (32x/30v),
  • Purge (remove) the evil (10x/10v),
  • Remember (15x),
  • Forget/forgotten (13x),
  • Command (-ed, -ment, -ments) (127x, 98v),
  • Covenant (27x/26v),
  • Bless/blessed/blessing (50x/45v),
  • Life (19x/15v),
  • Curse(s)/cursed/cursing (34x/32v),
  • Death (23x/19v),
  • Fear (25x/25v),
  • Carefully (8x),
  • Shall not (128x/116v),
  • LORD spoke (9x),
  • LORD will (34x/34v),
  • LORD your God (279x/239v),
  • Lord our God (22x/21v),
  • Nation(s) (46x/41v),
  • Circumcise (Dt 10:16, Dt 30:6).

Jesus quoted from Deuteronomy three times in His temptation in the wilderness [Mat 4:1-11; Dt 8:3; Dt 6:16; Dt 6:13,14; also Dt 10:20].

Key Verses:

Dt 6:5 - "You shall love the LORD your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your might."

Dt 7:9 - "Know therefore that the LORD your God, He is God, the faithful God, who keeps His covenant and His lovingkindness to a thousandth generation with those who love Him and keep His commandments."

Henrietta Mears writes that "You will come to appreciate the full force & magnetic beauty of Deuteronomy only as you read its pages....Nothing in literature matches the majesty of its eloquence. Nothing in the OT has any more powerful appeal for the spiritual life. No book in all the Word of God pictures better the life that is lived according to God's will & the blessings showered upon the soul who comes into the richness & fullness of spiritual living along the rugged pathway of simple obedience...If you want a taste of heaven on earth, become familiar with Deuteronomy." (What the Bible is All About)

J Sidlow Baxter - The Hebrew name for this fifth writing of Moses was Haddebharim, that is, "the Words" - this name being taken from the opening verse of the book: "these be the words which Moses spake unto all Israel on this side Jordan in the wilderness ..." This name sufficiently marks off its special character from the more definitely historical and legislative books which have preceded it. The history and legislation of the earlier books are reviewed in Deuteronomy, but only as the basis for the words of admonition which are now recorded. In the truest, deepest, and profoundest sense, Deuteronomy is a book of words; for never were wiser or weightier words uttered.

Our own title, "Deuteronomy," is taken from the Greek, deuteros (second) and nomos (law) - the title which the Septuagint (Lxx) translators gave to the book when they translated the Old Testament into Greek, somewhere about the third century B.C. In Deuteronomy we have a second giving of the Law, or, rather, a new expounding of it to the new generation of Israel who had grown up in the wilderness and were needing to have the Law repeated and expounded to them before their entering into Canaan. Deuteronomy is not the giving of a new Law, but an explication of that which was already given.

A Book of Transition - Deuteronomy is a book of transition. It marks a transition in a fourfold way. First, it marks the transition to a new generation; for with the exception of Caleb and Joshua, and Moses himself, the old generation which came up from Egypt and was numbered at Sinai, had passed away, and a new generation had grown up. Second, it marks the transition to a new possession. The wilderness pilgrimage was to give place to the national occupancy of Canaan. Third, it marks the transition to a new experience, to a new life - houses instead of tents, settled habitation instead of wandering, and, instead of the wilderness diet, the milk and honey and corn and wine of Canaan. Fourth, it marks the transition to a new revelation of God - the revelation of His love. From Genesis to Numbers the love of God is never spoken of but here, in Deuteronomy, we have the wonderful words: "Because He loved thy fathers, therefore He chose their seed" (Dt 4:37); "the Lord did not set His love upon you, nor choose you because ye were more in number than any people, for ye were the fewest of all people; but because the Lord loved you" (Dt 7:7-8); "the Lord had a delight in thy fathers to love them" (Dt 10:15); "the Lord thy God turned the curse into a blessing unto thee, because the Lord thy God loved thee" (Dt 23:5).

While speaking of the transitionary nature of Deuteronomy, it is interesting to mention that just as the Old Testament begins with five historical books - Genesis to Deuteronomy, so the New Testament begins with five historical books - Matthew to Acts; and there is a striking parallel between The Acts of the Apostles, the fifth book of the New Testament, and Deuteronomy, the fifth book of the Old. The Acts, like Deuteronomy, marks a great transition. It marks the transition from the distinctive message of the "Gospels" to that of the epistles. Like Deuteronomy, it marks the transition to a new generation - a re-generation in Christ. Like Deuteronomy, it marks the transition to a new possession - a spiritual Canaan with "all blessings in the heavenlies, in Christ." Like Deuteronomy, it marks the transition to a new experience - a new birth, a new life, a new dynamic, in the Holy Spirit. Like Deuteronomy, it marks the transition to a new revelation of God - the revelation given in the Church epistles of "the mystery which from the beginning of the world hath been hid in God," namely, the Church; so that now "there might be known, by the Church, the manifold wisdom of God" (Eph 3:10).

But what is equally striking is that both Deuteronomy, the fifth book of the one group, and Acts, the fifth book of the other group, are books in which God gives His people a second chance. What is Deuteronomy? It is deuteros nomos, the second giving of the Law. Before the new generation is committed to Joshua's charge, Moses, at God's command, rehearses the Law to them. What is the book of the Acts? It is the second offer of the Kingdom of Heaven to the Jews, first at the capital, to the Jews of the homeland, and then through the empire, to the Jews of the dispersion. Of this we shall say more later; but it is well to have it in find even now. (Explore the Book- J. Sidlow Baxter - recommended)

Paul Van Gorder - If we were to write one word across this book to state its theme, it would be ''obedience.'' The significant promise and ominous warning are seen in Deuteronomy 11:26-28, which sums it all up. The book of Deuteronomy may be comfortably divided according to the addresses of Moses. Deuteronomy shows with unmistakable clarity the inflexibility of the law and the necessity of complete subjection to the Word of God. As Romans 3:19 declares, ''Now we know that whatever things the law saith, it saith to them who are under the law, that every mouth may be stopped, and all the world may become guilty before God.'' Christ is the fulfillment of the law. He is the only Israelite to obey God totally in the promised land. He alone kept the letter of the code that was set forth in Deuteronomy. The Lord Jesus quoted from Deuteronomy three times in His temptation in the wilderness [cp. Mat 4:1-11; Deu 8:3; 6:16; 6:13,14; also 10:20]. Surely, a book so valuable to the Savior in such a time must also be valuable to us!

But where do you find Christ pictured in the book of Deuteronomy? Ada Habershon in The Study of Types lists 67 types and 13 contrasts between Moses and Christ. The Lord Jesus is seen in a twofold way in the book of Deuteronomy: by prophecy and by type. These words of Moses are recorded in Deuteronomy 18:15, ''The Lord thy God will raise up unto thee a Prophet from the midst of thee, of thy brethren, like unto me; unto Him ye shall hearken.'' After the Lord Jesus fed the 5,000 in Galilee, the people said, ''This is of a truth that prophet that should come into the world'' (John 6:14). Shortly before the stones were hurled that crushed out the life of Stephen, that godly believer [quoted Moses] about Jesus. ''This is that Moses who said unto the children of Israel, A Prophet shall the Lord, your God, raise up unto you of your brethren, like me; Him shall ye hear'' (Acts 7:37). Stephen indicated that Jesus Christ is the One of whom Moses spoke.

Christ Pictured in the Life of Moses-- The Scripture says that our Lord was a prophet ''like unto Moses.'' Please consider the following points as you study Deuteronomy. -- Both Moses and Christ...

(1) were goodly children [Ex 2:2; Heb 11:23; Luke 2:52].

(2) refused a kingdom (Heb 11:26a) [Mat 4:8-10].

(3) were the object of a king's wrath [Heb 11:27; Acts 4:27].

(4) acted for the joy of the reward [Heb 11:26b] (Heb 12:2).

(5) were called out of Egypt [Mat 2:13-15].

(6) were rejected at first by their brethren [Ex 2:14; John 1:11]

(7) made the sea obey them [Ex 14:15,16,21; Mark 4:39-41].

(8) had people who wanted to stone them [Num 14:8-10; John 10:31-33].

(9)delivered a parting blessing to Israel [Dt 33:26-29; Mat 23:37-39]

(10)had their resurrection contested (Jude 1:9; Mat 17:3; 28:12-18).

(11) [are] associated in the song of eternity (Rev 15:3).

Van Gorder goes on to write - "we see striking similarities to the death and resurrection of our Lord.

(1) Moses went up to die (Dt 34:1). Christ ascended to Calvary [John 19:17,18].

(2) Moses was alone, except for God (Dt 34:6). Christ's followers forsook Him [Mat 26:56].

(3) The Lord talked to him (T 34:4) [Heb 1:8-12].

(4) Moses' faculties were unimpaired (Dt 34:7). Christ remained in control until His death [John 10:17,18]

(5) What a funeral! Moses died ''according to the word of the Lord'' (34:5); literally, ''at the mouth of the Lord.'' Christ dismissed His own spirit when the work was completed [Mat 27:50; Jn 19:28-30].

(6) This is not the last we see of Moses. He stood with Christ and Elijah on the mount of transfiguration, 1500 years later [Mat 17:1-3]. Evidently, the devil tried to hold the body of Moses so that he could not appear with the Lord Jesus (Jude 1:9). Death could not hold our Savior [Acts 2:24].

(OT Reflections of Christ - Deuteronomy)

THE PENTATEUCH
SUMMARIZED

BOOK

KEY
IDEA

THE
NATION

THE
PEOPLE

GOD'S
CHARACTER

GOD'S
ROLE

GOD'S
COMMAND

Genesis

Beginnings
Ruin

Chosen

Prepared

Powerful
Sovereign

Creator

"Let there be!"

Exodus

Redemption

Delivered

Redeemed

Merciful

Deliverer

"Let My people go!"

Leviticus

Worship

Set Apart

Taught

Holy

Sanctifier

"Be Holy!"

Numbers

Wandering

Directed

Tested

Just

Sustainer

"Go in!"

Deuteronomy

Renewed
Covenant

Made
Ready

Retaught

Loving
Lord

Rewarder

"Obey!"

Source: Talk Thru the Bible


Deuteronomy by Irving Jensen- used by permission
deut
Source: Ryrie Study Bible

Deuteronomy

Dt 1:1-4:43 Dt 4:44-26:19 Dt 27:1-34:12

Moses'
First
Discourse

Moses'
Second
Discourse

Moses'
Third
Discourse

Historical Review Legal
Exposition
Prophetical
Promises

Looking Back

40 Years

Looking Up
What God
Expected of Israel
Looking Ahead
What God
Will Do for Israel
Recapitulation of Wanderings Rehearsal
of Israel's Law
Ratification
of Israel's Covenant
Historical Appendices
Remembrance of the past Commandments
for the Present
Dt 27:1-30:20
Blessing and Cursing
Dt 31:1-34:12
Death of Moses
Take Heed
Don't forget
Ten
Commands
Related
Commands
Two Choices Affecting
the Future
Moses' Parting Words
Dt 1:1-4:43
Looking Back
Dt 4:44-11:32
Exposition of Decalogue
Dt 12:1-16:17
Ceremonial Laws
Dt 16:18-20:20
Civil
Laws
Dt 21:1-26:19
Social
Laws
Dt 27:1-28:68
Ratification of Covenant
Dt 29:1-30:20
Terms of Covenant
Dt 31:1-34:12
Moses' Song, Blessing, Death

Plains of Moab

ca. 2 Months
Moses: Author

(Except Dt 34)

Key Words (NAS95):

  • Heart (49x/45v),
  • Love (24x/23v),
  • Listen (31x/31v),
  • Obey/obedient (15x),
  • Observe (26x),
  • Keep (32x/30v),
  • Purge (remove) the evil (10x/10v),
  • Remember (15x),
  • Forget/forgotten (13x),
  • Command (-ed, -ment, -ments) (127x, 98v),
  • Covenant (27x/26v),
  • Bless/blessed/blessing (50x/45v),
  • Life (19x/15v),
  • Curse(s)/cursed/cursing (34x/32v),
  • Death (23x/19v),
  • Fear (25x/25v),
  • Carefully (8x),
  • Shall not (128x/116v),
  • LORD spoke (9x),
  • LORD will (34x/34v),
  • LORD your God (279x/239v),
  • Lord our God (22x/21v),
  • Nation(s) (46x/41v),
  • Circumcise (Dt 10:16, Dt 30:6).

Jesus quoted from Deuteronomy three times in His temptation in the wilderness [Mat 4:1-11; Dt 8:3; Dt 6:16; Dt 6:13,14; also Dt 10:20].

Key Verses:

Dt 6:5 - "You shall love the LORD your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your might."

Dt 7:9 - "Know therefore that the LORD your God, He is God, the faithful God, who keeps His covenant and His lovingkindness to a thousandth generation with those who love Him and keep His commandments."

Henrietta Mears writes that "You will come to appreciate the full force & magnetic beauty of Deuteronomy only as you read its pages....Nothing in literature matches the majesty of its eloquence. Nothing in the OT has any more powerful appeal for the spiritual life. No book in all the Word of God pictures better the life that is lived according to God's will & the blessings showered upon the soul who comes into the richness & fullness of spiritual living along the rugged pathway of simple obedience...If you want a taste of heaven on earth, become familiar with Deuteronomy." (What the Bible is All About)

J Sidlow Baxter - The Hebrew name for this fifth writing of Moses was Haddebharim, that is, "the Words" - this name being taken from the opening verse of the book: "these be the words which Moses spake unto all Israel on this side Jordan in the wilderness ..." This name sufficiently marks off its special character from the more definitely historical and legislative books which have preceded it. The history and legislation of the earlier books are reviewed in Deuteronomy, but only as the basis for the words of admonition which are now recorded. In the truest, deepest, and profoundest sense, Deuteronomy is a book of words; for never were wiser or weightier words uttered.

Our own title, "Deuteronomy," is taken from the Greek, deuteros (second) and nomos (law) - the title which the Septuagint (Lxx) translators gave to the book when they translated the Old Testament into Greek, somewhere about the third century B.C. In Deuteronomy we have a second giving of the Law, or, rather, a new expounding of it to the new generation of Israel who had grown up in the wilderness and were needing to have the Law repeated and expounded to them before their entering into Canaan. Deuteronomy is not the giving of a new Law, but an explication of that which was already given.

A Book of Transition - Deuteronomy is a book of transition. It marks a transition in a fourfold way. First, it marks the transition to a new generation; for with the exception of Caleb and Joshua, and Moses himself, the old generation which came up from Egypt and was numbered at Sinai, had passed away, and a new generation had grown up. Second, it marks the transition to a new possession. The wilderness pilgrimage was to give place to the national occupancy of Canaan. Third, it marks the transition to a new experience, to a new life - houses instead of tents, settled habitation instead of wandering, and, instead of the wilderness diet, the milk and honey and corn and wine of Canaan. Fourth, it marks the transition to a new revelation of God - the revelation of His love. From Genesis to Numbers the love of God is never spoken of but here, in Deuteronomy, we have the wonderful words: "Because He loved thy fathers, therefore He chose their seed" (Dt 4:37); "the Lord did not set His love upon you, nor choose you because ye were more in number than any people, for ye were the fewest of all people; but because the Lord loved you" (Dt 7:7-8); "the Lord had a delight in thy fathers to love them" (Dt 10:15); "the Lord thy God turned the curse into a blessing unto thee, because the Lord thy God loved thee" (Dt 23:5).

While speaking of the transitionary nature of Deuteronomy, it is interesting to mention that just as the Old Testament begins with five historical books - Genesis to Deuteronomy, so the New Testament begins with five historical books - Matthew to Acts; and there is a striking parallel between The Acts of the Apostles, the fifth book of the New Testament, and Deuteronomy, the fifth book of the Old. The Acts, like Deuteronomy, marks a great transition. It marks the transition from the distinctive message of the "Gospels" to that of the epistles. Like Deuteronomy, it marks the transition to a new generation - a re-generation in Christ. Like Deuteronomy, it marks the transition to a new possession - a spiritual Canaan with "all blessings in the heavenlies, in Christ." Like Deuteronomy, it marks the transition to a new experience - a new birth, a new life, a new dynamic, in the Holy Spirit. Like Deuteronomy, it marks the transition to a new revelation of God - the revelation given in the Church epistles of "the mystery which from the beginning of the world hath been hid in God," namely, the Church; so that now "there might be known, by the Church, the manifold wisdom of God" (Eph 3:10).

But what is equally striking is that both Deuteronomy, the fifth book of the one group, and Acts, the fifth book of the other group, are books in which God gives His people a second chance. What is Deuteronomy? It is deuteros nomos, the second giving of the Law. Before the new generation is committed to Joshua's charge, Moses, at God's command, rehearses the Law to them. What is the book of the Acts? It is the second offer of the Kingdom of Heaven to the Jews, first at the capital, to the Jews of the homeland, and then through the empire, to the Jews of the dispersion. Of this we shall say more later; but it is well to have it in find even now. (Explore the Book- J. Sidlow Baxter - recommended)

Paul Van Gorder - If we were to write one word across this book to state its theme, it would be ''obedience.'' The significant promise and ominous warning are seen in Deuteronomy 11:26-28, which sums it all up. The book of Deuteronomy may be comfortably divided according to the addresses of Moses. Deuteronomy shows with unmistakable clarity the inflexibility of the law and the necessity of complete subjection to the Word of God. As Romans 3:19 declares, ''Now we know that whatever things the law saith, it saith to them who are under the law, that every mouth may be stopped, and all the world may become guilty before God.'' Christ is the fulfillment of the law. He is the only Israelite to obey God totally in the promised land. He alone kept the letter of the code that was set forth in Deuteronomy. The Lord Jesus quoted from Deuteronomy three times in His temptation in the wilderness [cp. Mat 4:1-11; Deu 8:3; 6:16; 6:13,14; also 10:20]. Surely, a book so valuable to the Savior in such a time must also be valuable to us!

But where do you find Christ pictured in the book of Deuteronomy? Ada Habershon in The Study of Types lists 67 types and 13 contrasts between Moses and Christ. The Lord Jesus is seen in a twofold way in the book of Deuteronomy: by prophecy and by type. These words of Moses are recorded in Deuteronomy 18:15, ''The Lord thy God will raise up unto thee a Prophet from the midst of thee, of thy brethren, like unto me; unto Him ye shall hearken.'' After the Lord Jesus fed the 5,000 in Galilee, the people said, ''This is of a truth that prophet that should come into the world'' (John 6:14). Shortly before the stones were hurled that crushed out the life of Stephen, that godly believer [quoted Moses] about Jesus. ''This is that Moses who said unto the children of Israel, A Prophet shall the Lord, your God, raise up unto you of your brethren, like me; Him shall ye hear'' (Acts 7:37). Stephen indicated that Jesus Christ is the One of whom Moses spoke.

Christ Pictured in the Life of Moses-- The Scripture says that our Lord was a prophet ''like unto Moses.'' Please consider the following points as you study Deuteronomy. -- Both Moses and Christ...

(1) were goodly children [Ex 2:2; Heb 11:23; Luke 2:52].

(2) refused a kingdom (Heb 11:26a) [Mat 4:8-10].

(3) were the object of a king's wrath [Heb 11:27; Acts 4:27].

(4) acted for the joy of the reward [Heb 11:26b] (Heb 12:2).

(5) were called out of Egypt [Mat 2:13-15].

(6) were rejected at first by their brethren [Ex 2:14; John 1:11]

(7) made the sea obey them [Ex 14:15,16,21; Mark 4:39-41].

(8) had people who wanted to stone them [Num 14:8-10; John 10:31-33].

(9)delivered a parting blessing to Israel [Dt 33:26-29; Mat 23:37-39]

(10)had their resurrection contested (Jude 1:9; Mat 17:3; 28:12-18).

(11) [are] associated in the song of eternity (Rev 15:3).

Van Gorder goes on to write - "we see striking similarities to the death and resurrection of our Lord.

(1) Moses went up to die (Dt 34:1). Christ ascended to Calvary [John 19:17,18].

(2) Moses was alone, except for God (Dt 34:6). Christ's followers forsook Him [Mat 26:56].

(3) The Lord talked to him (T 34:4) [Heb 1:8-12].

(4) Moses' faculties were unimpaired (Dt 34:7). Christ remained in control until His death [John 10:17,18]

(5) What a funeral! Moses died ''according to the word of the Lord'' (34:5); literally, ''at the mouth of the Lord.'' Christ dismissed His own spirit when the work was completed [Mat 27:50; Jn 19:28-30].

(6) This is not the last we see of Moses. He stood with Christ and Elijah on the mount of transfiguration, 1500 years later [Mat 17:1-3]. Evidently, the devil tried to hold the body of Moses so that he could not appear with the Lord Jesus (Jude 1:9). Death could not hold our Savior [Acts 2:24].

(OT Reflections of Christ - Deuteronomy)

THE PENTATEUCH
SUMMARIZED

BOOK

KEY
IDEA

THE
NATION

THE
PEOPLE

GOD'S
CHARACTER

GOD'S
ROLE

GOD'S
COMMAND

Genesis

Beginnings
Ruin

Chosen

Prepared

Powerful
Sovereign

Creator

"Let there be!"

Exodus

Redemption

Delivered

Redeemed

Merciful

Deliverer

"Let My people go!"

Leviticus

Worship

Set Apart

Taught

Holy

Sanctifier

"Be Holy!"

Numbers

Wandering

Directed

Tested

Just

Sustainer

"Go in!"

Deuteronomy

Renewed
Covenant

Made
Ready

Retaught

Loving
Lord

Rewarder

"Obey!"

Source: Talk Thru the Bible

ALBERT BARNES

BENSON

BRIAN BELL

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HENRY BLUNT

JOHN CALVIN

CAMBRIDGE BIBLE FOR SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES - George Smith

RICH CATHERS

J. WILBUR CHAPMAN

ADAM CLARKE

DAVID COLBURN

THOMAS CONSTABLE

W A CRISWELL

RON DANIEL - Sermon Notes

J N DARBY

BOB DEFFINBAUGH

GEORGE DOUGLAS

SAMUEL DRIVER - Critical and Exegetical Commentary

JOHN DUMMELOW

C J ELLICOTT (1882) OT COMMENTARY FOR ENGLISH READERS

ELISABETH ELLIOT

EXPLORE THE BIBLE

  1. The God of Opportunities (Deut. 1:1-3:29)

EXPOSITORY DICTIONARY OF TEXTS

EXPOSITOR'S BIBLE 

A C GAEBELEIN

GENEVA STUDY BIBLE

GENE GETZ

  • Deuteronomy; Principle #1; Deut. 1:1-5;Our Future Generation: Pastors and parents should be faithful in teaching each new generation God's will for their lives. Video
  • Deuteronomy; Principle #2; Deut. 1:9-18; Qualified Assistants: As a church grows numerically, primary leaders should maintain their pastoral priorities by appointing qualified men and women to assist them. Video
  • Deuteronomy; Principle #3; Deut. 1:19-33; Maintaining a Clear Focus: To overcome discouragement and distorted thinking, we must remember God's faithfulness in the past and His promises for the future. Video
  • Deuteronomy; Principle #4; Deut. 1:34-46; Authentic Repentance: When we have disobeyed God and suffered the consequences, we are to confess our sins and then rely on God's strength to enable us to live in His will. Video

JOHN GILL

GOTQUESTIONS

L M GRANT 

DAVID GUZIK

ROBERT HAWKER Poor Man's Commentary 

MATTHEW HENRY

STEVE HEREFORD - nice overview sermon

F B HOLE

HOMILETICS

HYMNS RELATED  - click for Hymn list and links

JAMIESON, FAUSSET, BROWN

W G JORDAN

KEIL AND DELITZSCH

WILLIAM KELLY

MEREDITH G KLINE 

PAUL E KRETZMANN - Popular Commentary

GARY KUKIS

  • Deuteronomy 1 - 521 pages(!) numerous translations, some commentary

J P LANGE

MAURICE MCCARTHY

WILLIAM MACDONALD - Check this resource.

C H MACKINTOSH

J VERNON MCGEE - Thru the Bible - Mp3's

F B MEYER "Through the Bible" 

MOODY BIBLE - Devotionals

G CAMPBELL MORGAN

HENRY MORRIS - Defender's Study Bible

JAMES MOULTON

ROBERT NEIGHBOR

NET BIBLE NOTES

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OUR DAILY BREAD

JOSEPH PARKER

PETER PETT 

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PREACHER'S HOMILETICAL COMMENTARY

PULPIT COMMENTARY

  • Deuteronomy 1 Exposition  Scroll down page for homilies below
  • Deuteronomy 1:1-4 The Deuteronomic Discourses
  • Deuteronomy 1:2 The Might have Been Life
  • Deuteronomy 1:1-5 The Word of God full of hidden treasure
  • Deuteronomy 1:1-8 The Hebrew Right to Canaan
  • Deuteronomy 1:1-8 Divine Covenant and Human Conduct - the two hemispheres of a complete life
  • Deuteronomy 1:1-18 The Impartiality of God to be Reflected in the Judges of His People
  • Deuteronomy 1:6-18 Rules to be Observed in Choosing Leaders
  • Deuteronomy 1:6-9 A Summons to Advance
  • Deuteronomy 1:10-11 Israel's Increase
  • Deuteronomy 1:19-16 Division of Labor
  • Deuteronomy 1:16-17 Judging
  • Deuteronomy 1:9-18 The Blessing of Good Government
  • Deuteronomy 1:19 That Great and Terrible Wilderness
  • Deuteronomy 1:19-33 Sending the Spies
  • Deuteronomy 1:19-33 The Unbelief in Sending and in Hearkening the Spies
  • Deuteronomy 1:19-46 Irrecoverableness of Wasted Opportunity
  • Deuteronomy 1:21 Courage
  • Deuteronomy 1:22-32 The Mission of the Spies
  • Deuteronomy 1:31-33 Love in the Wilderness
  • Deuteronomy 1:32-35 The Grievous Consequences of Unbelief
  • Deuteronomy 1:34-40 The Excluded and the Admitted
  • Deuteronomy 1:34-46 The Heirs of Promise
  • Deuteronomy 1:40-46 Tardy Repentance
  • Deuteronomy 1:41-46 Forced Back!

REFORMATION STUDY BIBLE

DON ROBINSON Deuteronomy Sermons

SERMON AUDIO

SERMON BIBLE COMMENTARY

CHARLES SIMEON

  • Deuteronomy 1  - sermons below 
  • Deuteronomy 1:11 The Prosperity of Zion Desired
  • Deuteronomy 1:21 Victory Assured to the True Israel

CHUCK SMITH

C H SPURGEON

JOSEPH SUTCLIFFE

JOE TEMPLE

THIRD MILLENNIUM Commentary Notes on Deuteronomy

JOHN TRAPP

BOB UTLEY

DANIEL WHEDON

SERMONS BY VERSE - older expositors

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