2 Thessalonians Commentaries & Sermons

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HE HAS NOT YET COME
Click chart to enlarge
Charts from Jensen's Survey of the NT - used by permission
Another Overview Chart - 2 Thessalonans - Charles Swindoll


There is considerable variation of opinion as to how the prophetic portion of this epistle (specifically 2 Thessalonians 2:1-12) should be interpreted. Therefore it is strongly advised that you perform your own Inductive Bible Study of Paul's short letter before you go to your favorite commentary or sermon. The venerable Bible expositor Dr Warren Wiersbe adds that "The purpose of Bible prophecy is not for us to make a calendar, but to build character. Paul emphasized this fact in both of his Thessalonian letters, and our Lord warned us not to set dates for His coming (Mt 24:36, 42). Date-setters are usually upsetters, and that is exactly what happened in the Thessalonican assembly."

And as brothers and sisters in Christ we must always seek to be agreeable in our disagreements, for as our Lord declared "By this all men will know that you are My disciples, if you have love for one another. (John 13:35)


INTRODUCTIONS AND OVERVIEWS:


DICTIONARY ARTICLES:


John MacArthur - Background and Setting - For the history of Thessalonica, see Introduction to 1 Thessalonians: Background and Setting. Some have suggested that Paul penned this letter from Ephesus (Acts 18:18–21), but his 18 month stay in Corinth provided ample time both for the Thessalonian epistles to be authored (Acts 18:11). Apparently, Paul had stayed appraised of the happenings in Thessalonica through correspondence and/or couriers. Perhaps the bearer of the first letter brought Paul back an update on the condition of the church, which had matured and expanded (1 Th 1:3); but pressure and persecution had also increased. The seeds of false doctrine concerning the Lord had been sown, and the people were behaving disorderly. So Paul wrote to his beloved flock who were: (1) discouraged by persecution and needed incentive to persevere; (2) deceived by false teachers who confused them about the Lord’s return; and (3) disobedient to divine commands, particularly by refusing to work. Paul wrote to address those 3 issues by offering: (1) comfort for the persecuted believers (2 Th 1:3–12); (2) correction for the falsely taught and frightened believers (2 Th 2:1–15); and 3) confrontation for the disobedient and undisciplined believers (2 Th 3:6–15). (Introduction)


J. Hampton Keathley III Theme and Purpose

Second Thessalonians was evidently prompted by three main developments in the report Paul received from an unknown source. He wrote: (1) to encourage them in view of the report of the increasing persecution which they were facing (2 Th 1:4-5); (2) to deal with the reports of a pseudo-Pauline letter and other misrepresentations of his teaching regarding the day of the Lord and the rapture of the church (2 Th 2:1f); and (3) to deal with the way some were responding to belief in the imminent return of the Lord. This belief was still being used as a basis for shirking their vocational responsibilities. So the apostle wrote to deal with the condition of idleness or disorderliness which had increased (2 Th 3:5-15).

To meet the needs that occasioned this epistle, the apostle wrote to comfort and correct. In doing so he pursued three broad purposes. He wrote: (1) to give an incentive for the Thessalonians to persevere by describing the reward and retribution that will occur in the future judgment of God (2 Th 1:3-10); (2) to clarify the prominent events belonging to the day of the Lord in order to prove the falsity of the claims that the day had already arrived (2 Th 2:1-2); and (3) to give detailed instructions covering the disciplinary steps the church should take to correct those who refused to work (2 Th 3:6-15).

Swindoll:

"Woven by the careful hands of a tentmaker, 2 Thessalonians adorns the New Testament like a literary tapestry. Looked at from the earthward side, we find the believers suffering in chapter 1, shaken from their composure in chapter 2, and slackening in their responsibilities in chapter 3. The underside of the tapestry seems to be a hodgepodge of dark, tangled, and loose threads. But Paul displays the heavenward side of the tapestry in 2 Thessalonians 1:5-12. As we look at it from that vantage point, we gain not only perspective but encouragement to persevere—to walk through the furnace of persecution, over the seas of prophetic error, and around the pitfalls in practical living. Paul’s letter helps us make sense of our suffering, gain stability in doctrinal uncertainty, and become steadfast in principles of responsible living… Apparently, either through a revelation someone claimed to have had or a sermon preached or by a forged document that was reputedly Paul’s, word had begun to spread in this church that the ‘day of the Lord’ had already come. This false message produced two extreme results. Some were ‘shaken’ and ‘disturbed’ (2:2); others began to shirk their responsibilities, waiting in their porch swings for the Lord’s return as they whittled away their time (2 Th 3:10-12) …

Chapter 1: Affirmation: persevering through affliction develops maturity

Chapter 2: Explanation: trusting amidst confusion produces stability

Chapter 3: Exhortation: waiting with discipline cultivates responsibility.”

Hiebert:

“It is asserted that Paul could not have written 2 Thessalonians since its eschatology is contradictory to that in 1 Thessalonians; in 1 Thessalonians the second coming is thought of as being imminent and occurring suddenly while in 2 Thessalonians it is preceded by definite signs. It is generally admitted today that this objection has no real weight. It is common in apocalyptic literature to find the elements of suddenness and signs occurring side by side. Wikenhauser points out that ‘even in the eschatological discourse of Jesus we find harbingers of the parousia mentioned (Mk 13, 6 sq.), alongside the warning to be vigilant because the day is uncertain (Mk 13, 33 sq.).’ … The epistle reflects favorable as well as unfavorable features of the report from Thessalonica. Paul took the occasion to commend his converts for their remarkable growth in faith and love (2 Th 1:3) and to encourage them to steadfastness under persecution with the assurance that their afflictions would be justly recompensed when the Lord returned in judgment (2 Th 1:5-12). But the real purpose in writing was to deal with the doctrinal error concerning the day of the Lord and to rebuke the disorderly conduct of certain members.”

Baxter:

“In chapter i. the great hope of the Lord’s second coming is set before the Thessalonians as their great consolation amid the tribulations which they were having to endure for Christ’s sake. Next, in chapter ii. The apostle furnishes them with authoritative correction concerning the time and the way of Christ’s return. Finally, in chapter iii. There is the apostle’s counteraction of practical error concerning present duty in the waiting-time till Christ returns.”

Stedman:

“There are three chapters in this little letter, and each one is a correction of a very common attitude that many people still have about disturbing times. The first chapter is devoted to a correction of the attitude of discouragement in the face of difficulty. These Christians were undergoing ‘persecutions’ and ‘afflictions’ and although they were bearing up with good grace, nevertheless, many of them were getting discouraged. ‘Why try any more?’ they were saying; ‘There's no justice. Everything is always against us.’

And to counteract that attitude, the apostle reminds them that the day when God would repay them for the difficulties they were going through was coming. …

In chapter 2 you have another reaction to disturbing times -- fear. We read in these opening words (verses 1-2):

Now concerning the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ and our assembling to meet him, we beg you, brethren, not to be quickly shaken in mind or excited, [really the word is troubled] either by spirit or by word, or by letter purporting to be from us, to the effect that the day of the Lord has come. {2 Th 2:1-2 RSV}

These people had evidently received a letter from somebody signing Paul's name, telling them that in this terrible time of trouble all they had to look forward to was worse times. But Paul says, ‘don't be shaken in your mind.’ Literally, don't be shaken out of your wits by what's happening. I think many of our young people today are fearful, and striking out against society, because they don't know that God is in control of events. …

Chapter 3 deals, finally, with the conduct of these believers in the face of difficulty and pressure. Paul was correcting here a third very widespread attitude that many have in times of difficulty -- what we might call ‘fanaticism.’ There were certain people in Thessalonica who were saying,’Why not just wait until he comes? Why should we concern ourselves about making a living? Let's just live and enjoy ourselves, and wait for his coming.’"


Wil Pounds - 2 Thessalonians the Day of the Lord has not yet Come.

Thessalonica, the capital of Macedonia, occupied a strategic location in the first–century missiology and world evangelism. There was an ancient saying that "So long as nature does not change, Thessalonica will remain wealthy and prosperous."

She was a wealthy city with fertile soil, forest and mineral deposits in the area. Thessalonica was located on the Thermaic Gulf and was Macedonia’s chief outlet to the sea. Her seaport was situated at the junction of the northern trade route to the Danube and the Egnatian Way running across the Balkans and linking the East to the Adriatic Sea and Rome.

During Paul’s day, Thessalonica was a free city. The proconsul of Macedonia had official residence there, however he did not interfere with the local government unless some Roman law was violated. Rome respected the rights of these free cities, so long as no disorder and rebellion erupted. Self-government, within limits, was allowed through a city council and board of magistrates.

Paul seized the unique opportunity to reach this mobile, cosmopolitan population on his second missionary journey.

AUTHOR: Paul the apostle is the stated author (1:1; 3:17). The vocabulary, style and doctrinal content supports this claim. The external evidence for the second letter is even stronger than the first one.

DATE: Paul writes his second letter a few months after sending the first letter to the Thessalonians in A. D. 50-51 from Corinth. These two letters are among the earliest of Paul’s writings and the New Testament books.

PURPOSE: Paul’s first letter to the church at Thessalonica did not settle all the differences in the church there. This second letter is written to correct misunderstandings regarding the Second Coming of Christ which were not corrected with the first letter. The "day of the Lord" had not already come, and it will not come until after "the man of lawlessness" has appeared (2:9-10). With some of the members it had precisely the opposite result. There was some opposition to Paul’s authority and even defiance toward him. Therefore, Paul repeats his "command" for discipline (II Thess. 3:6, 10, 14). There were deceivers who falsified letters in Paul’s name to carry their point in the church (2:1f). A. T. Robertson strongly asserts,

Paul’s keen resentment against the practice should make us slow to accept the pseudepigraphic theory about other Pauline Epistles. He calls attention to his own signature at the close of each genuine letter. As a rule he dictated the epistle, but signed it with his own hand (3:17)."

Paul’s central concern is to correct their mistaken view regarding the day of the Lord and to rebuke their idleness.

STYLE: The second letter is sharper in tone than the first. It is also briefer, almost like a quick memo shot off from the pen of a busy pastor, or mission executive. It may be with some annoyance because of their meddlesome idleness.

THEME: The day of the Lord will not arrive until after the man of sin has appeared. Second Thessalonians is the theological sequel to the first letter. It is a letter of encouragement, explanation and exhortation to a persecuted church.

Dr. Merrill C. Tenney points out that every major doctrine of the Christian faith is touched upon in these two letters of Paul.

Paul and those who received his epistles believed in one living God (1 Th 1:9), the Father (2 Th 1:2), who has loved men and has chosen them to enjoy his salvation (2 Th 2:16;1 Th 1:4). He has sent deliverance form wrath through Jesus Christ, his Son (1 Th 1:10), and has revealed this deliverance through the message of the gospel (1 Th  1:5; 2:9; 2 Th 2:14). This message has been confirmed and has been made real by the power of the Holy Spirit (1 Th 1:5; 4:8). The gospel concerns the Lord Jesus Christ, who was killed by the Jews (1 Th  2:15). He rose from the dead (1 Th 1:10; 4:14; 5:10). He is now in heaven (1 Th 1:10), but he will come again (1 Th 2:19; 4:15; 5:23; 2 Th 2:1). To him is ascribed deity, for he is called Lord (1 Th 1:6), God’s Son (1 Th 1:10), and the Lord Jesus Christ (1 Th 1:1, 3; 5:28; 2 Th 1:1). Believers receiving the word of God (1 Th 1:6), turn from idols, serve God and wait for the return of Christ (1 Th 1:9, 10). Their normal growth is sanctification (1 Th 4:3, 7; 2 Th 2:13). In personal life they are to be clean (1 Th 4:4-6), industrious (1 Th 4:11, 12), prayerful (1 Th 5:17), cheerful (1 Th 5:16). Theoretically and practically the Thessalonian letters embody all the essentials of Christian truth."

The major emphasis of Second Thessalonians is eschatological. There will be a future time of judgment coming when God will settle His accounts (1:5-10). Paul corrects their misunderstanding about the Day of the Lord (2:1). Some in the church had fallen into the error of thinking that the day had already arrived, however Paul instructs them that certain things must occur first. Before the day commences there will be an all-out rebellion against God (2:3). Many will revolt on a world–wide scale against their Creator. There will be the revealing of the man of lawlessness (2:3b). As Christ shall be revealed in His "time" even so shall the antichrist. He is a mystery to be unfolded and make manifest. The terrible judgment which is to come upon him and all those who follow him is sharply contrasted by the glory of Christ in which all the elect shall share. Introduction to 2 Thessalonians


From Paul Apple's Commentary - Theme: “He has not come yet” / 3 Main Divisions

Chapter 1. Persecution

  • “we give thanks”
  • “don’t be disturbed”
  • Tone: Commendation
  • Manifestation of the Lord in Glory a comfort to the persecuted / a terror to the unconverted

Chapter 2. Prophecy

  • “we beseech” …
  • “we give thanks”
  • “Stand firm”
  • Tone: Correction Revelation of the Man of Sin a revelation and consummation of the lawless one

Chapter 3. Practice

  • “we command”
  • “pray … keep aloof … work”
  • Tone: Exhortation
  • Action of the Word of the Lord demands a severance of fellowship with evil and idle men

OUTLINE OF 2 THESSALONIANS:

I. Salutation (2 Thessalonians 1:1-2)

II. Comfort in Affliction (2 Thessalonians 1:3-12)

A. Perseverance in the Midst of Persecutions (2 Thessalonians 1:3-10)

1. The Perseverance of the Saints (2 Thessalonians 1:3-4)

2. The Vindication of God’s Righteousness (2 Thessalonians 1:5-10)

B. Preparation of the Saints for the Kingdom (2 Thessalonians 1:11-12)

III. Correction Concerning the Day of the Lord (2 Thessalonians 2:1-12)

A. Summary: Doctrinal Correction (2 Thessalonians 2:1-2)

B. Day of the Lord Yet Future (2 Thessalonians 2:3-5)

C. The Unveiling of the Antichrist (2 Thessalonians 2:6-12)

IV. Reminder Concerning their Destiny (2 Thessalonians 2:13-17)

A. Standing Firm in Light of this Destiny (2 Thessalonians 2:13-15)

B. Benediction: Encouraged Hearts (2 Thessalonians 2:16-17)

V. Exhortations Concerning Practical Matters (2 Thessalonians 3:1-15)

A. Request for Prayer (2 Thessalonians 3:1-5)

B. Rebuke of the Idle (2 Thessalonians 3:6-15)

VI. Final Greetings (2 Thessalonians 3:16-18) (Outline)

PRECEPT UPON PRECEPT
2 THESSALONIANS INDUCTIVE STUDY

Related Resource: Inductive Bible Study

HENRY ALFORD
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY
The New Testament for English Readers

HENRY ALFORD
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY 
The Greek Testament

PAUL APPLE
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY

72 page modern commentary. Conservative. Evangelical. Literal Interpretation of 2 Th 2:1-12. Each section includes numerous quotes (including "Quotes for Reflection"), devotional thoughts and questions.

Below is an excerpt of Apple's notes related to 2 Thessalonians 1:1-2 to give you a sense the type of material available in this resource:

DEVOTIONAL QUESTIONS:

1) How is this greeting alike / different from the greeting in 1 Thessalonians?

2) Why does Paul bother even to mention Silvanus and Timothy?

3) Do we find our lives to be content with the sufficiency of the divine resources of grace and peace?

4) Why such an emphasis on the Fatherhood of God in this opening?

QUOTES FOR REFLECTION:

Neil: “These opening words remind us, as we need constantly to be reminded, that Thessalonians is, like the other Pauline epistles, neither a theological treatise nor a sermon, but a real letter, written at a specific time to meet a specific situation. For this is precisely the way in which any private letter of the times would begin, with the name of the writer, followed by the name of the addressee, and a polite greeting… So he greets them, not just with good wishes, but with a prayer that grace may be granted them – that unmerited gift of God’s love to men through Christ, forgiving, strengthening, uplifting them; making them at one with Him, and thereby giving them the peace that passes all understanding, the inward tranquility, health, and soundness of life in harmony with God.”

Hiebert: “In our materialistic age, believers need to be reminded again that all our blessings have their origin in God the Father whom we have come to know through the Lord Jesus Christ.”

Ryrie: “The position of these believers, while locally in Thessalonica and circumstantially in persecution, was spiritually in God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. The oneness of the Father and the Son as well as the oneness of believers with the Godhead is affirmed.”

Piper: “He wants the Christians to read the truths of this letter as shared truths, and he wants them to hear the concerns of the letter not merely as his own but also as the concerns and burdens of Silvanus (another spelling for Silas) and Timothy -- the men who were with Paul when the church in Thessalonica was started (Acts 17). Since God had used all three of them to start the church, it's fitting that God's ongoing ministry come to them in the name of these three men…. In other words, Paul greets the church in such a way as to remind them that they are a family (in the care of a Father) and that they are servants (in the charge of a Lord). These two descriptions of God as Father and Lord, and thus of the church as family and servants, corresponds to two of our deepest needs. Paul is not just throwing words away here. He is already encouraging and strengthening us as Christians if we will slow down and listen.

The two needs that everyone of us has are the need for rescue and help and the need for purpose and meaning. We need a heavenly Father to pity us and rescue us from sin and misery. We need his help at every step of the way because we are so weak and vulnerable. But we also need a heavenly Lord to guide us in life and tell us what is wise and give us a great and meaningful charge to fulfill. We don't just want to be safe in the care of a Father. We want a glorious cause to live for. We want a merciful Father to be our Protector; and we want an omnipotent Lord to be our Champion and our Commander and our Leader.”

Ritchie: “What a team--Paul, Silas and Timothy! Paul, the converted Jew, called by God on the Damascus road some twenty years earlier to become, as our Lord said, ‘A chosen instrument of mine, to bear my name before the Gentiles and kings and the sons of Israel, for I will show him how much he must suffer for my name s sake’ (Acts 9:15- 16). Then there was Silas, a Hellenistic Jew, a prominent member of the Council of Jerusalem. Silas had the gilt of prophecy, and was asked by the Council to accompany Paul and Barnabas to Antioch in order to encourage the growing church there. After Paul and Barnabas had a falling-out over Mark, Barnabas 'nephew, Paul asked Silas to accompany him on his second missionary journey. Then there was Timothy, whom Paul would later call his ‘beloved son’ His father was a Greek, and his mother and grandmother were God-fearing Jews. They, together with Timothy, may have become Christians during Paul's first visit to Lystra (Acts 14:6, II Timothy 1:2, 5). Spiritually blessed with the gifts of encouragement and teaching, Timothy was asked by the apostle to join the teams for the upcoming missionary journey.”

Hocking:

(1) He refers to their relationship to God as a church

(2) He refers to their resources from God

BRIAN BELL
2 THESSALONIANS SERMONS

Calvary Chapel, Murrieta

WILLIAM BARCLAY
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY

James Rosscup: This is a lucid and well-organized exposition of the epistles with many helpful lists on different facets of truth John can have in mind at different points as on “light” and “darkness” in I John 1:5. There is stimulating background material and warm application. (Commentaries for Biblical Expositors: An annotated bibliography of selected works).

D Edmond Hiebert - Prints the author's own translation. A series of popular studies whose strong point is word study. Contains good illustrative material. Part of the author's interpretation follows a liberal position. Barclay holds that Christ's descent into Hades gave those who there heard Him a second chance.

Comment: I appreciate Barclay's unique insights on Greek words, but clearly his teaching about a "second chance" is NOT sound doctrine! Be an Acts 17:11 Berean with Barclay. See discussion of his orthodoxy especially the article "The Enigmatic William Barclay".

ALBERT BARNES
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY

Notes on the New Testament

James Rosscup writes that Barnes "includes 16 volumes on the Old Testament, 11 on the New Testament. The New Testament part of this old work was first published in 1832–1851. Various authors contributed. It is evangelical and amillennial...Often the explanations of verses are very worthwhile." (Commentaries for Biblical Expositors: An Annotated Bibliography of Selected Works)

C H Spurgeon "Albert Barnes is a learned and able divine, but his productions are unequal in value, the gospels are of comparatively little worth, but his other comments are extremely useful for Sunday-school teachers and persons with a narrow range of reading, endowed with enough good sense to discriminate between good and evil....Placed by the side of the great masters, Barnes is a lesser light, but taking his work for what it is and professes to be, no minister can afford to be without it, and this is no small praise for works which were only intended for Sunday-school teachers." (Spurgeon, C. H. Lectures to my Students, Vol. 4: Commenting and Commentaries; Lectures Addressed to the students of the Pastors' College, Metropolitan Tabernacle)

JOHANN (JOHN) BENGEL
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY
The Critical English Testament

Represents Combination of Bengel's Gnomon and Comments by more modern expositors (in brackets) (1877). Not Futuristic on Mt 24

James Rosscup writes "This work (Gnomon), originally issued in 1742, has considerable comment on the Greek, flavoring the effort with judicious details about the spiritual life. It has much that helps, but has been surpassed by many other commentaries since its day." (Commentaries for Biblical Expositors: An Annotated Bibliography of Selected Works or Logos)

Charles Haddon Spurgeon -- "'A Critical New Testament, so compiled as to enable a reader, unacquainted with Greek, to ascertain the exact English force and meaning of the language of the New Testament, and to appreciate the latest results of modern criticism.' Such is the professed aim of this commentary, and the compilers have very fairly carried out their intentions. The whole of Bengel’s Gnomon is bodily transferred into the work, and as one hundred and twenty years have elapsed since the first issue of that book, it may be supposed that much has since been added to the wealth of Scripture exposition; the substance of this has been incorporated in brackets, so as to bring it down to the present advanced state of knowledge. We strongly advise the purchase of this book, as it is multum in parvo, and will well repay an attentive perusal. Tischendorf and Alford have contributed largely, with other German and English critics, to make this one of the most lucid and concise commentaries on the text and teachings of the New Testament" (Spurgeon, C. H. Lectures to my Students, Vol. 4: Commenting and Commentaries; Lectures Addressed to the students of the Pastors' College, Metropolitan Tabernacle)

JOHANN A BENGEL
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY
Gnomon

JOSEPH BENSON
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY

Spurgeon - Adopted by the Wesleyan Conference as a standard work, and characterized by that body as marked by “solid learning, soundness of theological opinion, and an edifying attention to experimental and practical religion. Necessary to Methodist Students.

WILLIAM BURKITT
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY

Spurgeon - We liked Burkitt better when we were younger. He is, however, a homely and spiritual writer, and his work is good reading for the many. Burkitt is somewhat pithy, and for a modern rather rich and racy, but he is far from deep, and is frequently common-place. I liked him well enough till I had read abler works and grown older. Some books grow upon us as we read and re-read them, but Burkitt does not. Yet so far from depreciating the good man, I should be sorry to have missed his acquaintance, and would bespeak for him your attentive perusal.

JOHN CALVIN
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY

James Rosscup - Calvin was not only a great theologian but also a great expositor, and his insight into Scripture contributed to his grasp of doctrinal truth. His commentaries are deep in spiritual understanding, usually helpful on problem passages, and refreshing in a devotional sense to the really interested reader. He usually offers good help on a passage. The present work skips Judges, Ruth, Samuel, Kings, Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, Job, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon, II and III John and Revelation. Calvin is amillennial on long-range prophecy, but in other respects usually has very contributive perception on passages and doctrinal values edifying to the believer. He also can be very wordy, but the serious and patient glean much. 

Cyril Barber - he messages were taken down in shorthand and were later translated by a person who signed himself "L.T" Spurgeon highly esteemed these messages, and they are now available again in the same format as that which graced the homes of Puritan laypeople three hundred years ago. Their richness and relevance will amply repay the time spent mastering their contents. This is a worthy reprint, beautifully bound, and printed on fine paper. Recommended

D Edmond Hiebert - Valuable for insights into Reformation day views.

GEORGE CLARKE
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY

1906 - "Designed for Pastors and Sunday Schools"

THOMAS CONSTABLE
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY

James Rosscup - A diligently prepared brief work by an evangelical, who explains profitably verse by verse and comments well on many of the difficult passages. He deals with passages about the rapture and “Day of the Lord” (I Thessalonians 4–5; II Thessalonians 2) in a premillennial, dispensational way. A similar but more detailed effort of this nature is in the commentary by Robert L. Thomas. Constable is quite helpful in giving views, for example in regard to problems in II Thessalonians 2:1–12. He takes the restrainer to be the Holy Spirit.

W A CRISWELL
2 THESSALONIANS SERMONS

JAMES DENNEY
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY
The Expositor's Bible

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2 THESSALONIANS 
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EXPOSITOR'S BIBLE COMMENTARY
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY

EXPOSITOR'S GREEK TESTAMENT
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY
James Moffatt

DAVID GUZIK
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY

DAVID HOLWICK
2 THESSALONIANS SERMONS

HYMNS
RELATING TO 2 THESSALONIANS

ILLUSTRATIONS
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J HAMPTON KEATHLEY III
2 THESSALONIANS
Exegetical and Devotional Commentary

STEVE LEWIS
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY

Audio/slides available at Table of Contents

JOHN MACARTHUR
2 THESSALONIANS SERMONS

J VERNON McGEE
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY
Thru the Bible

MISCELLANEOUS WRITINGS
Related to Prophecy

Charts Various Topics

Daniel

Daniel 9:24-27 Verse by Verse Commentary

Prophecy

Rapture

Resurrection:

Revelation, book of

MISCELLANEOUS RESOURCES
2 THESSALONIANS
Commentaries, Sermons, Devotionals

MIKE ANDRUS, DICK HUGH AND JOSH BLACK - SERMON SERIES ON 2 THESSALONIANS

Each transcript averages about 10 pages.

Best Commentaries

  • Hiebert, D. Edmond. The Thessalonian Epistles. Chicago: Moody, 1971.- This is one of the best available in my opinion and sadly not even mentioned by Challies or Ligonier (below)
  • Rosscup adds "This work by the late Dr. Hiebert, Professor of New Testament, Biblical Seminary, Fresno, California, takes its place among the best on Paul’s two eschatological epistles. The author, taking the premillennial, pretribulational view, is not unaware of major interpretive problems, and he fairly presents different sides and then draws his conclusions. Many features make this volume valuable: background information, extensive bibliography up to its day, numerous footnotes, and a rich use of the original Greek." (Rosscup - Commentaries for Biblical Expositors)
  • Hogg, C. F. and W. E. Vine. The Epistles of Paul the Apostle to the Thessalonians. London: Alfred Holness, 1914. Available in the following software packages
  • Rosscup - "A premillennial and dispensational work, this commentary is rich in word meanings and details in the Greek" (Note: The collection includes many other commentaries including one on Isaiah).
     
  • Best Commentaries on 1 & 2 Thessalonians - Tim Challies
  • Top 5 Commentaries on the Books of 1 & 2 Thessalonians - Ligonier
  • Best Commentary on 1-2 Thessalonians - Best Commentaries Reviews

KENNETH BOA

WAYNE BRINDLE

F F BRUCE

GEOFF BROWN

MAL COUCH

A E KNOCH - conservative, literal, discussions vary from 4 pages to more than 20 pages depending on length of the book.

RON DANIEL

FRANK DENNISON

PAUL DIXON

DAVID MALICK

BOB DEFFINBAUGH

MARK DEVER

STANLEY ELLISEN

PAUL FEINBERG

GENE GETZ - LIFE PRINCIPLES - SHORT VIDEOS

  • 2 Thessalonians; Principle #1; 2 Th. 1:3-2:4; Clarifying Doctrinal Issues: Local church leaders should discover and address areas of spiritual weakness among their disciples. Video
  • 2 Thessalonians; Principle #2; 2 Th. 2:5-17; Preparation or Speculation: No matter what happens in the future, we are to encourage believers to stand firm in their faith, hope, and love, always being ready for Christ's return. Video
  • 2 Thessalonians; Principle #3; 2 Th. 3:6-15; Church Discipline: To help believers who are demonstrating economic irresponsibility, we are to exercise some form of church discipline. Video

GOTQUESTIONS.ORG

GEORGE GUNN

GREG HARRIS

J B HIXSON - slideshow only

HOLMAN STUDY BIBLE

JAMES B JOSEPH

RICHARD MAYHUE

H WAYNE HOUSE

MONERGISM

HENRY MORRIS

GENE PENSIERO

JAMES ROSSCUP

JAMES STITZINGER

R L THOMAS

DANIEL WALLACE

  • The “Temple of God” in 2 Thessalonians 2-4- Literal or Metaphorical - read link for how Wallace arrives at the following conclusion.
    "In conclusion, we are on much surer ground if we see the literal temple referenced in 2 Thess 2:4. If so, then it seems that such may well be rebuilt. Thus, when the antichrist sits on the mercy seat, claiming to be God, he will have culminated a long line of multiple and partial fulfillments of Daniel's prophecy, beginning with Antiochus Epiphanes. Let the reader beware."

BRUCE WINTER

ANDY WOODS

COMMENTARIES
ON 2 THESSALONIANS

PAUL APPLE

JOHANN A BENGEL

BIBLICAL ILLUSTRATOR

CAMBRIDGE BIBLE FOR SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES - George Findlay

CAMBRIDGE GREEK TESTAMENT

ADAM CLARKE

THOMAS CONSTABLE

J N DARBY

EASY ENGLISH

CHARLES ELLICOTT

JAMES FRAME

A C GAEBELEIN

James Rosscup - This dispensationally oriented work is not verse-by-verse, but deals with the exposition on a broader scale, treating blocks of thought within the chapters. Cf. also Arno C. Gaebelein, Gaebelein’s Concise Commentary on the Whole Bible (I Volume, Neptune, NJ: Loizeaux, 1985), the Annotated Bible revised. The author was a popular evangelical Bible teacher of the first part of the century, much like H. A. Ironside in his diligent but broad, practical expositions of Bible books. Gaebelein was premillennial and dispensational, and editor for many years of Our Hope Magazine.

JOHN GILL

James Rosscup - Gill (1697–1771), a pastor of England, wrote these which are two-column pages, ca. 900–1,000 pages per volume, Originally they were 9 volumes, folio. He also wrote Body of Divinity, 3 volumes, and several other volumes. His commentary is evangelical, wrestles with texts, is often wordy and not to the point but with worthy things for the patient who follow the ponderous detail and fish out slowly what his interpretation of a text is. He feels the thousand years in Revelation 20 cannot begin until after the conversion of the Jews and the bringing in of the fullness of the Gentiles and destruction of all antiChristian powers (volume 6, p. 1063) but in an amillennial sense of new heavens and new earth coming right after Christ’s second advent (1064–65), and the literal thousand years of binding at the same time. He feels the group that gathers against the holy city at the end of the thousand years is the resurrected wicked dead from the four quarters of the earth (i.e. from all the earth, etc. (1067).  

Spurgeon - Beyond all controversy, Gill was one of the most able Hebraists of his day, and in other matters no mean proficient...His ultraism is discarded, but his learning is respected: the world and the church take leave to question his dogmatism, but they both bow before his erudition. Probably no man since Gill’s days has at all equalled him in the matter of Rabbinical learning.

He preached in the same church as C. H. Spurgeon over one hundred years earlier. Yet most people today have never heard of John Gill. This is unfortunate, since his works contain priceless gems of information that are found nowhere except in the ancient writings of the Jews. 

L M GRANT

JAMES GRAY

F B HOLE

HOMILETICS

GRACE NOTES

MATTHEW HENRY

Spurgeon - A Christian man wishing for the cream of expository writers could not make a better purchase. Ministers, as a rule, should not buy condensations, but get the works themselves.

James Rosscup - This evangelical work, devotional in character, has been in constant demand for about 280 years. Its insight into human problems is great, but it often does not deal adequately with problems in the text. The one-volume form eliminates the Biblical text and is thus less bulky. It has sold very well. The late Wilbur M. Smith, internationally noted Bible teacher, seminary professor and lover of books, tabbed this “The greatest devotional commentary ever written”. Henry was born in a Welch farmhouse, studied law, and became a Presbyterian minister near London. He wrote this commentary in the last 13 years before he died at 52 in 1714. The first of six volumes was published in 1708. He completed through Acts, and the rest of the New Testament was done by 14 clergymen. (Ed: Thus James are not the comments of Matthew Henry).

H A IRONSIDE

John Cereghin - . Popular expositions. He urges the joy of soulwinning (14); stressses the enabling power of God (34); teaches unlimited redemption in Christ (55); emphasizes that only God can qualify men for the ministry (73); attacks Theosophy, Seventh Day Adventism, Christian Science (103); warns against the "social gospel" (111): holds that the Sermon on the Mount is for all believers (139); warns against evolution (155).

James Rosscup - He is staunchly evangelical, showing good broad surveys based on diligent study, practical turns, even choice illustrations. In prophecy he is premillennial dispensational....Many preachers have found that Ironside works, read along with heavier books on details of exegesis, help them see the sweep of the message and prime their spirits for practical relevance.

JAMIESON, FAUSSET, BROWN

Rosscup - This is a helpful old set of 1863 for laypeople and pastors to have because it usually comments at least to some degree on problems. Though terse, it provides something good on almost any passage, phrase by phrase and is to some degree critical in nature. It is evangelical. There is also a 1-volume edition, briefer at some points (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1961). Especially in its multi-volume form this is one of the old evangelical works that offers fairly solid though brief help on many verses. Spurgeon said, “It contains so great a variety of information that if a man had no other exposition he would find himself at no great loss if he possessed this and used it diligently” (Commenting and Commentaries, p. 3). Things have changed greatly since this assessment! It is primarily of help to pastors and lay people looking for quick, though usually somewhat knowledgeable treatments on verses.

Spurgeon - A really standard work. We consult it continually, and with growing interest. Mr. Fausset’s portion strikes us as being of the highest order. 

My Comment - This is one of the best older (Pre-1800) works on interpretation of prophecy as it tends to interpret the text literally and not allegorically.

JAMIESON, FAUSSET, BROWN Unabridged Version

WILLIAM KELLY

D Edmond Hiebert - A full, vigorous interpretation with a clear Plymouth Brethren emphasis.

John Cereghin - A careful exposition by a voluminous Plymouth Brethren scholar of the 19th century.

LANGE COMMENTARIES

H A W MEYER

GEORGE MILLIGAN

Rosscup - Some regarded this in its day as the best work on the Greek text. However, it is old, and the works by Best, Bruce, Hendriksen, Hiebert, Hogg and Vine, Marshall, Morris, Thomas and Wanamaker have been more helpful to some.

MATTHEW POOLE

PULPIT COMMENTARY

JOHN SCHULTZ - 18 page commentary by former missionary to Irian Jaya, Indonesia

SERMONS BY VERSE - at bottom of page, older messages

SERMON BIBLE

SPEAKER'S COMMENTARY

BOB UTLEY

2 THESSALONIANS 1

JOHN WALVOORD

RAY STEDMAN

JOHN MACARTHUR

PASTOR LIFE

JAMES ROSSCUP

DANNY HALL

G CAMPBELL MORGAN

DON ROBINSON

ALEXANDER MACLAREN

JOHN MACARTHUR

A B SIMPSON

F B MEYER

RICH CATHERS

2 THESSALONIANS 2

JOHN WALVOORD

ANDREW BONAR

THOUGHTS ON ESCHATOLOGY

DONALD CANTRELL

DAVID DEAN

BOB FROMM

C I SCOFIELD

JOHN MACARTHUR

RAY PRITCHARD

RICH CATHERS

RAY STEDMAN

THOMAS MANTON

DON ROBINSON

WILLIAM W COMBS

H WAYNE HOUSE

THOMAS ICE

DAVID REAGAN

ROBERT THOMAS

JOHN MACARTHUR

A W PINK

DANIEL WALLACE

MIKE STALLARD

TONY GARLAND

JOHN MACARTHUR

CHARLES POWELL

G CAMPBELL MORGAN

JOHN MACARTHUR

J C PHILPOT

A W PINK

GREGORY HARRIS

ANDREW MURRAY

A W PINK

F B MEYER

OCTAVIUS WINSLOW

OCTAVIUS WINSLOW

J C PHILPOT

JOHN WALVOORD

JOHN MACARTHUR

RAY STEDMAN

C H SPURGEON

JOHN ANGELL JAMES

ALEXANDER MACLAREN

OCTAVIUS WINSLOW

J C PHILPOT

2 THESSALONIANS 3

JOHN WALVOORD

JAMES HASTINGS

JOHN MACARTHUR

RAY PRITCHARD

RICH CATHERS

DAVID E OWEN

DON ROBINSON

C H SPURGEON

ALEXANDER MACLAREN

FRANKLIN L KIRKSEY

RAY STEDMAN

G CAMPBELL MORGAN

OCTAVIUS WINSLOW

BRUCE WINTER

F B MEYER

RAY STEDMAN

ALEXANDER MACLAREN

JOHN MACARTHUR

NET BIBLE
2 THESSALONIANS NOTES

OUR DAILY BREAD
Devotional Illustrations

Radio Bible Class. Updated December, 2018

JOHN PIPER
2 THESSALONIANS SERMONS

Note: Please be aware that Dr Piper favors a Post-Tribulation rapture (read his article… Definitions & Observations Concerning the 2nd Coming of Christ). Be a Berean!

PRECEPT LECTURES
2 THESSALONIANS
Kay Arthur (KA)
Wayne Barber (WB)

RAY PRITCHARD
2 THESSALONIANS SERMONS

Excellent Exposition

RON RITCHIE
2 THESSALONIANS SERMONS

A. T. ROBERTSON
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY SERMONS

Word Pictures on 2 Thessalonians Greek Word Studies

ROB SALVATO
2 THESSALONIANS SERMONS

Calvary Chapel Vista

CHARLES SIMEON
2 THESSALONIANS SERMONS

NOTE: If you are not familiar with the great saint Charles Simeon see Dr John Piper's discussion of Simeon's life - you will want to read Simeon's sermons after meeting him! - click Brothers We Must Not Mind a Little Suffering (Mp3 even better)

CHUCK SMITH
2 THESSALONIANS
COMMENTARY & SERMONS

Calvary Chapel

RAY STEDMAN
2 THESSALONIANS SERMONS

C H SPURGEON
2 THESSALONIANS EXPOSITION

C. H. SPURGEON
2 THESSALONIANS SERMONS

TREASURY OF SCRIPTURE KNOWLEDGE
2 THESSALONIANS CROSS REFERENCES
R A Torrey

Note: The best commentary on Scripture is Scripture (Compare Scripture with Scripture) and these cross references compiled by Torrey are the most comprehensive work of this type with over 500,000 entries. However, always check the context (Keep Context King) to make sure that the cross reference is referring to the same subject as the original Scripture. The Puritan writer Thomas Watson said it this way - "The Scripture is to be its own interpreter or rather the Spirit speaking in it; nothing can cut the diamond but the diamond; nothing can interpret Scripture but Scripture." See an example of the value of comparing Scripture with Scripture. See also Use of Cross-References

C H SPURGEON
Devotional from Morning and Evening

THIRD MILLENNIUM
STUDY NOTES

Chapter 1

Chapter 2

Chapter 3

TODAY'S WORD
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY 
Grant Richison

MARVIN VINCENT
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY 
New Testament Word Studies

Notes on original Greek text.

JOHN WALVOORD
2 THESSALONIANS COMMENTARY

SERMONS BY VERSE

2 THESSALONIANS 1

Approbation and Blessing W. H. Griffith Thomas 2 Thessalonians 1:1
God's Judgment When Christ Returns Martin Luther 2 Thessalonians 1:1
Sanctification J. Wilbur Chapman 2 Thessalonians 1:1
A Growing Faith J. H. Evans, M. A. 2 Thessalonians 1:1-3
A Lecture for Little Faith C. H. Spurgeon. 2 Thessalonians 1:1-3
Abounding Charity T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:1-3
Christian Progress Bp. Jewell. 2 Thessalonians 1:1-3
Constant Growth J. Gordon. 2 Thessalonians 1:1-3
Growing Faith A. G. Brown. 2 Thessalonians 1:1-3
The Duty of Thanksgiving   2 Thessalonians 1:1-3
The Matter of Thankfulness T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:1-3
The Necessity of a Growing Faith C. H. Spurgeon. 2 Thessalonians 1:1-3
The Peace of the Believer   2 Thessalonians 1:1-3
The Prosperity of the Thessalonian Church C. Simeon, M. A. 2 Thessalonians 1:1-3
The Use of the Church H. W. Beecher. 2 Thessalonians 1:1-3
The Value of the Church H. W. Beecher. 2 Thessalonians 1:1-3
The Introduction B.C. Caffin 2 Thessalonians 1:1-4
Manifestation of Solemn Interest R. Finlayson 2 Thessalonians 1:1-12
Grace and Peace W.F. Adeney 2 Thessalonians 1:2
A Lecture for Little-Faith Charles Haddon Spurgeon 2 Thessalonians 1:3
Growing Faith W.F. Adeney 2 Thessalonians 1:3
Thanksgiving for the Spiritual Progress of the Thessalonians T. Croskery 2 Thessalonians 1:3
Faith and Patience T. Manton , D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:4
Patient Endurance A. H. Baynes. 2 Thessalonians 1:4
The Apostle's Interest in the Thessalonian Church T. Croskery 2 Thessalonians 1:4
The Apostolic Commendation T. Manton , D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:4
The Power of Patience Sunday at Home. 2 Thessalonians 1:4
The Purpose of Trouble T. Manton , D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:4
A Token of Righteous Judgment W.F. Adeney 2 Thessalonians 1:5
Persecutions a Demonstration of the Judgment T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:5
Present Suffering and Future Glory Zion's Herald 2 Thessalonians 1:5
The Significance of These Sufferings in Relation to Divine Judgment T. Croskery 2 Thessalonians 1:5
Worthiness of the Kingdom of God T. Manton , D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:5
Rest After Suffering H. W. Beecher. 2 Thessalonians 1:6-7
Rest At Last T. Guthrie, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:6-7
Rest for the Troubled T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:6-7
Rest not for the Present Percy Anecdotes 2 Thessalonians 1:6-7
Rest not on Earth E. Foster. 2 Thessalonians 1:6-7
The Craving for Rest Erasmus. 2 Thessalonians 1:6-7
The Thought of Rest   2 Thessalonians 1:6-7
The Two Troubles and the Troublers C. Bradley, M. A. 2 Thessalonians 1:6-7
The Future Judgment as to its Righteousness T. Croskery 2 Thessalonians 1:6-10
The Judgment Day W.F. Adeney 2 Thessalonians 1:6-10
Joy and Terror in the Coming of the Lord The Study 2 Thessalonians 1:7-10
The Coming of Christ with His Angels T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:7-10
The Great Day B.C. Caffin 2 Thessalonians 1:7-10
Christ's Coming T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:8
Degrees of Divine Knowledge J. Culross, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:8
Ignorance and Disobedience T. Manton , D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:8
Ignorance of God J. Wesley. 2 Thessalonians 1:8
Loyalty and Disloyalty to the Gospel Dr. Rees. 2 Thessalonians 1:8
Banishment from God's Presence J. Garbett, M. A. 2 Thessalonians 1:9
Hell, a Necessary Truth J. Christen, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:9
Punishment Irremediable J. Christien, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:9
The Glory of His Power C. J. P. Eyro, M. A. 2 Thessalonians 1:9
The Punishment of the Wicked   2 Thessalonians 1:9
The Reality of Perdition T. De Witt Talmage. 2 Thessalonians 1:9
Christ Glorified H. Kollock, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:10
Christ Glorified   2 Thessalonians 1:10
Christ Glorified in Glorified Men A. Maclaren, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:10
Christ Glorified in His People C. H. Spurgeon. 2 Thessalonians 1:10
Christ Glorified in His Saints J. Vaughan, M. A. 2 Thessalonians 1:10
Christ Marvelled At   2 Thessalonians 1:10
Christ Reflected in His People C. H. Spurgeon. 2 Thessalonians 1:10
Faith as a Motive Power Prof. Tholuck. 2 Thessalonians 1:10
Jesus Admired in Them that Believe C. H. Spurgeon. 2 Thessalonians 1:10
The Beauty of God   2 Thessalonians 1:10
The Day of Christ's Glory and of the Church's Joy C. J. P. Eyre, M. A., W. Brock, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:10
The Final Advent D. Thomas, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:10
The Glory of Christ as Exhibited in His People J. Kay. 2 Thessalonians 1:10
The Saints' Estate of Glory At the Judgment   2 Thessalonians 1:10
The Second Coming N. Lardner, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:10
The Testimony Believed T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:10
Faith Fulfilled W. Sparrow. 2 Thessalonians 1:11
Salvation the Result of the Pleasure of God's Goodness and His Power T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:11
Worthiness of Divine Calling   2 Thessalonians 1:11
Worthy of the Christian Calling W.F. Adeney 2 Thessalonians 1:11
Worthy of Your Calling Alexander Maclaren 2 Thessalonians 1:11
Experimental Christianity J. Burns, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:11-12
Prayer for the Thessalonians in Prospect of Their Glorification T. Croskery 2 Thessalonians 1:11, 12
St. Paul's Prayer for the Thessalonians B.C. Caffin 2 Thessalonians 1:11, 12
The Good Pleasure of Goodness W. B. Pope, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:11-12
A Christian is the Reflex of Christ Pastor Funcke. 2 Thessalonians 1:12
Christ Glorified in His Servants T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:12
Christ is Glorious in the Character of His Followers in That G. Spring, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 1:12
Glorified W.F. Adeney 2 Thessalonians 1:12

2 THESSALONIANS 2

Caution Against Error W. Burkitt, M. A. 2 Thessalonians 2:1
Reunion Dean Vaughan. 2 Thessalonians 2:1
The Advent as a Motive Prof. Jowett. 2 Thessalonians 2:1
The Coming of Christ C. Hodge, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:1
The Coming of Christ T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:1
A Great Delusion W.F. Adeney 2 Thessalonians 2:1, 2
A Misapprehension, Respecting the Time of the Second Advent T. Croskery 2 Thessalonians 2:1, 2
The Day of Christ not Immediate B.C. Caffin 2 Thessalonians 2:1, 2
Antichrist R. Finlayson 2 Thessalonians 2:1-12
A Firm Anchorage J. Hutchison, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:2
Calmness in View of the Second Advent Bp. Alexander. 2 Thessalonians 2:2
Dangers of Deception J. Hutchison. 2 Thessalonians 2:2
Dissuasives Against Error T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:2
Errors Concerning the Second Advent   2 Thessalonians 2:2
Spirits to be Tried   2 Thessalonians 2:2
An Evil and Presumptuous One T. Scott, M. A. 2 Thessalonians 2:3
Apostasy and Antichrist T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:3
Christ and Antichrist E. Irving, Bp. Alexander. 2 Thessalonians 2:3
Judas a Type of the Papacy Canon Stowell. 2 Thessalonians 2:3
Signs of the Second Advent Capel Molyneux, M. A. 2 Thessalonians 2:3
The Development of Antichrist T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:3
The Falling Away Prof. Jowett. 2 Thessalonians 2:3
The Man of Sin D. Thomas, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:3
The Man of Sin W.F. Adeney 2 Thessalonians 2:3
Antichrist T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:4
Restraints Removed Prof. Ganot. 2 Thessalonians 2:6-7
The Restraining Power and its Withdrawal Canon Body. 2 Thessalonians 2:6-7
Lawlessness and the Lawless One Dean Vaughan. 2 Thessalonians 2:7
The Development of Antichrist Bp. Jewell. 2 Thessalonians 2:7
The Mystery of Godliness and the Mystery of Iniquity Canon Stowell. 2 Thessalonians 2:7
The Mystery of Iniquity W. G. Humphrey, B. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:7
The Mystery of Iniquity Dean Close. 2 Thessalonians 2:7
The Mystery of Iniquity C. S. Robinson, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:7
Wickedness a Mystery Heubner. 2 Thessalonians 2:7
The Mystery of Lawlessness W.F. Adeney 2 Thessalonians 2:7, 8
Antichrist   2 Thessalonians 2:8
The Christian Revelation of Life Newman Smyth, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:8
The Means of the Destruction of Antichrist C. Lee. 2 Thessalonians 2:8
Emissaries of Satan T. De Witt Talmage. 2 Thessalonians 2:9
The Agency of Satan J. Towle. 2 Thessalonians 2:9
The Methods of the Man of Sin and the Retribution that Overtakes His Victims T. Croskery 2 Thessalonians 2:9-12
The Love of the Truth W.F. Adeney 2 Thessalonians 2:10-12
Choice Influences Belief G. Sexton. 2 Thessalonians 2:11-12
God and Error G. Sexton, LL. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:11-12
God's Logic of Sin J. T. Wightman. 2 Thessalonians 2:11-12
Ill-Disposed Affections Naturally and Penally the Cause of Darkness and Error R. South, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:11-12
Judicial Infatuation J. Hutchison, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:11-12
Natural Law in the Spiritual World G. Sexton. 2 Thessalonians 2:11-12
Punishment According to Law H. W. Beecher. 2 Thessalonians 2:11-12
The Infatuation of the Followers of Antichrist   2 Thessalonians 2:11-12
God not the Author of Damnation R. S. Barrett. 2 Thessalonians 2:12
Progress in Unrighteousness T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:12
Election Charles Haddon Spurgeon 2 Thessalonians 2:13
Apostolic Thanksgiving for the Election and the Calling of the Thessalonians T. Croskery 2 Thessalonians 2:13, 14
The Divine Work of Salvation W.F. Adeney 2 Thessalonians 2:13, 14
Connection Between Faith and the Sanctification of the Spirit L. O. Thompson. 2 Thessalonians 2:13-17
Effectual Calling   2 Thessalonians 2:13-17
Election T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:13-17
Exhortation to Steadfastness R. Finlayson 2 Thessalonians 2:13-17
God's Salvation Clerical World 2 Thessalonians 2:13-17
Gratitude for Salvation C. Simeon, M. A. 2 Thessalonians 2:13-17
Gratitude to God for Salvation T. B. Baker. 2 Thessalonians 2:13-17
Holiness   2 Thessalonians 2:13-17
Justification and Sanctification C. H. Spurgeon. 2 Thessalonians 2:13-17
St. Paul's Hopes for the Thessalonians B.C. Caffin 2 Thessalonians 2:13-17
The Favoured People T. Kidd. 2 Thessalonians 2:13-17
The Nature, Duty, and Privilege of a Christian J. D. Geden, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:13-17
Effectual Calling   2 Thessalonians 2:14
Effectual Calling and Divine Glory J. Burns, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:14
Exhortation to a Steadfast Maintenance of Apostolic Traditions T. Croskery 2 Thessalonians 2:15
Inspired Traditions Viewed in Relation to the Ministry and the Church J. Woodward. 2 Thessalonians 2:15
Scripture and Tradition Archdeacon Farrar. 2 Thessalonians 2:15
Stand Fast C. H. Spurgeon. 2 Thessalonians 2:15
The Scripture Sufficient Without Unwritten Traditions T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:15
A Good Hope E. Martin. 2 Thessalonians 2:16
A Superlative Gift R. Cope, LL. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:16
Everlasting Consolation and Good Hope Alexander Maclaren 2 Thessalonians 2:16
Everpresent Comfort C. Hodge, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:16
False and True Consolation A. Raleigh, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:16
Good Hope Through Grace J. C. Miller, M. A. 2 Thessalonians 2:16
Good Hope Through Grace G. Burder. 2 Thessalonians 2:16
Good Hope Through Grace T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:16
Hope and Steadfastness W. Baxendale. 2 Thessalonians 2:16
Hope Without Grace H. W. Beecher. 2 Thessalonians 2:16
The Comforts Propounded to Us in the Gospel T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:16
The Eternal Comforters L. Abbott, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:16
The Inspiration of Hope T. Watson. 2 Thessalonians 2:16
The Inspiration of Hope W. M. Punshon, LL. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:16
A Benediction W.F. Adeney 2 Thessalonians 2:16, 17
Divine Love and its Gifts C. H. Spurgeon. 2 Thessalonians 2:16-17
Everlasting Consolation W. B. Pope, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:16-17
Free Grace a Motive for Free Giving C. H. Spurgeon. 2 Thessalonians 2:16-17
Prayer After Exhortation T. Croskery 2 Thessalonians 2:16, 17
Divine Comfort T. Manton, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 2:17
Divine Comfort J. Spencer. 2 Thessalonians 2:17
Establishment   2 Thessalonians 2:17
Grace and Holiness W. H. Griffith Thomas 2 Thessalonians 2:17
Sustained by Christ T. De Witt Talmage. 2 Thessalonians 2:17

2 THESSALONIANS 3

Confidence in Prayer Scottish Christian Herald 2 Thessalonians 3:1
Prayer and Success George S. Mort, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 3:1
Prayer for Ministers J. Burnet. 2 Thessalonians 3:1
Prayer for Missions W.F. Adeney 2 Thessalonians 3:1
Spreading the Gospel Dr. Wayland. 2 Thessalonians 3:1
The Diffusion of the Gospel J. Cumming, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 3:1
The Glorification of the Gospel J. Fletcher, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 3:1
The Gospel's Conquests J. Ossian Davies. 2 Thessalonians 3:1
The Power of Prayer S. Martin. 2 Thessalonians 3:1
The Power of Prayer C. G. Finney, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 3:1
The Progress of Christianity Joseph Cook. 2 Thessalonians 3:1
The Success of the Gospel J. Brown. 2 Thessalonians 3:1
The Unfettered Gospel D. Fenn. 2 Thessalonians 3:1
Prayer for Missions B.C. Caffin 2 Thessalonians 3:1, 2
The Prayers of the Thessalonians Asked by the Apostle T. Croskery 2 Thessalonians 3:1, 2
Intimation of the Close of the Epistle R. Finlayson 2 Thessalonians 3:1-5
A Marvellous Deliverance J. L. Nye. 2 Thessalonians 3:2
God a Protector   2 Thessalonians 3:2
Lacking the Essential Archdeacon Richardson, M. A. 2 Thessalonians 3:2
An Effectual Guard J. H. Evans. 2 Thessalonians 3:3
Divine Faithfulness and Christian Obedience D. Mayo. 2 Thessalonians 3:3
Security W.F. Adeney 2 Thessalonians 3:3
The Certainty of Final Salvation   2 Thessalonians 3:3
The Established Christian Character W. F. Adeney, M. A. 2 Thessalonians 3:3
The Faithfulness of God E. Bersier, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 3:3
The Soul's Establishment and Safety Secured by the Faithfulness of God J. H. Evans. 2 Thessalonians 3:3
The Apostle's Cheerful Assurance and Confidence on Behalf of the Thessalonians T. Croskery 2 Thessalonians 3:3, 4
St. Paul's Confidence B.C. Caffin 2 Thessalonians 3:3-5
A Brief Prayer for Great Things R. Fergusson. 2 Thessalonians 3:5
Love and Patience W. B. Pope, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 3:5
Love and Peace W. H. Griffith Thomas 2 Thessalonians 3:5
Love Begets Love Prof. Drummond. 2 Thessalonians 3:5
Soul Elevation D. Thomas, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 3:5
St. Paul C. Simeon, M. A. 2 Thessalonians 3:5
The Apostle's Further Prayer for His Converts T. Croskery 2 Thessalonians 3:5
The Love of God E. Bickersteth. 2 Thessalonians 3:5
The Love of God J. Vaughan, M. A. 2 Thessalonians 3:5
The Love of God and the Patience of Christ G. W. Olver, B. A. 2 Thessalonians 3:5
The Patience of Christ W.F. Adeney 2 Thessalonians 3:5
Waiting for the Second Advent F. W. Robertson, M. A. 2 Thessalonians 3:5
Apostolic Authority A. Barnes, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 3:6
Coming Clear Out   2 Thessalonians 3:6
The Apostle's Method of Dealing with the Idle Busybodies of the Thessalonian Church T. Croskery 2 Thessalonians 3:6
Withdrawal from Such as Walk Disorderly E. Hopkins, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 3:6
Withdrawal from the Disorderly Canon Mason. 2 Thessalonians 3:6
Withdrawal from the Disorderly J. Hutchison, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 3:6
Duty of Withdrawing from a Disorderly Brother R. Finlayson 2 Thessalonians 3:6-15
The Importance of the Common Duties of Daily Life Shown B.C. Caffin 2 Thessalonians 3:6-15
Apostolic Example and Precept Concerning Industry J. Jortin, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 3:7-9
The Example of the Apostle Himself as a Support to His Command T. Croskery 2 Thessalonians 3:7-10
Commands to be Enforced by Example Life of General Gordon. 2 Thessalonians 3:9
Example W. Emmons, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 3:9
Example Better than Precept J. F. B. Tinting, B. A. 2 Thessalonians 3:9
How to Deal with Beggars J. L. Nye. 2 Thessalonians 3:10
Idlers H. O. Mackay. 2 Thessalonians 3:10
No Work, no Pay R. S. Barrett. 2 Thessalonians 3:10
Pauperizing Charity W.F. Adeney 2 Thessalonians 3:10
The Cure for Idleness H. O. Mackay. 2 Thessalonians 3:10
The Danger of Idleness C. H. Spurgeon. 2 Thessalonians 3:10
The Law of Labour Dean Close. 2 Thessalonians 3:10
Work Necessary for Man   2 Thessalonians 3:10
A Busybody Canon Mason. 2 Thessalonians 3:11-12
The Blessedness of Work J. W. Diggle, M. A. 2 Thessalonians 3:11-12
Exhortation to Well Doing T. Croskery 2 Thessalonians 3:13
Church Discipline W.F. Adeney 2 Thessalonians 3:14
A Faithful Admonisher S. Jones. 2 Thessalonians 3:14-15
Church Discipline   2 Thessalonians 3:14-15
How to Deal with the Erring Homiletic Monthly 2 Thessalonians 3:14-15
The True Spirit of Faithful Dealing with an Erring Brother T. Croskery 2 Thessalonians 3:14, 15
A Prayer for Peace T. Croskery 2 Thessalonians 3:16
Benediction and Invocation D. Mayo. 2 Thessalonians 3:16
Peace from the God of Peace W.F. Adeney 2 Thessalonians 3:16
Peace from the Lord of Peace F. D. Maurice, M. A. 2 Thessalonians 3:16
Peace from the Lord of Peace W. B. Pope, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 3:16
Peace of Conscience and Heart the Element of Holiness Dean Goulburn. 2 Thessalonians 3:16
Peace Versus War A. G. Brown. 2 Thessalonians 3:16
The Jewel of Peace C. H. Spurgeon. 2 Thessalonians 3:16
The Lord of Peace and the Peace of the Lord Alexander Maclaren 2 Thessalonians 3:16
Concluding Words R. Finlayson 2 Thessalonians 3:16-18
Conclusion B.C. Caffin 2 Thessalonians 3:16-18
Paul's Token Canon Mason., J. Hutchison, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 3:17
The Closing Salutation with its Autographic Significance T. Croskery 2 Thessalonians 3:17, 18
Christian Activity J. L. Nye. 2 Thessalonians 3:18
Grace J. Lyth, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 3:18
Motive and Work S. R. Tyng, jun. 2 Thessalonians 3:18
Perseverance A. Jessop, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 3:18
St. Paul's Tact Canon Mason. 2 Thessalonians 3:18
The Base Life and the Beautiful Dean Vaughan. 2 Thessalonians 3:18
The Benediction J. Lyth, D. D., J. Hutchison, D. D. 2 Thessalonians 3:18
The Cure of Weariness Weekly Pulpit 2 Thessalonians 3:18
The Tendency to Weariness in Well-Doing Illustrated and Opposed E. Cooper. 2 Thessalonians 3:18
Weariness in Well Doing C. H. Spurgeon. 2 Thessalonians 3:18
Weariness in Well-Doing John Foster. 2 Thessalonians 3:18
Without the Grace of Christ J. Whitecross. 2 Thessalonians 3:18
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DISCLAIMER: Before you "go to the commentaries" go to the Scriptures and study them inductively (Click 3 part overview of how to do Inductive Bible Study) in dependence on your Teacher, the Holy Spirit, Who Jesus promised would guide us into all the truth (John 16:13). Remember that Scripture is always the best commentary on Scripture. Any commentary, even those by the most conservative and orthodox teacher/preachers cannot help but have at least some bias of the expositor based upon his training and experience. Therefore the inclusion of specific links does not indicate that we agree with every comment. We have made a sincere effort to select only the most conservative, "bibliocentric" commentaries. Should you discover some commentary or sermon you feel may not be orthodox, please email your concern. I have removed several links in response to concerns by discerning readers. I recommend that your priority be a steady intake of solid Biblical food so that with practice you will have your spiritual senses trained to discern good from evil (Heb 5:14-note).