John 16 Commentary

CLICK VERSE
To go directly to that verse
(John Commentaries)



Click chart to enlarge
Charts from Jensen's Survey of the NT - used by permission
Another Chart from Charles Swindoll

Click to enlarge

NOTE: THIS PAGE IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION

John 16:1 “These things I have spoken to you so that you may be kept from stumbling.

  • John 16:4 15:11 Mt 11:6 13:21,57 24:10 26:31-33 Ro 14:21 Php 1:10 1Pe 2:8 

Related Passages: 

John 6:61+   But Jesus, conscious that His disciples grumbled at this, said to them, “Does this cause you to stumble (skandalizo) ?

1 John 2:10+  The one who loves his brother abides in the Light and there is no cause for stumbling (skandalizo)  in him.

PURPOSE OF
"THESE THINGS"

These things - This begs the simple question "What things"? Always pause to ponder and interrogate this little phrase which occurs 41 times in John's Gospel. Don't "speed read" the Bible! If you slow down and engage actively with "these things," by the time you finish John you will have honed the valuable discipline of pausing to ponder which will yield great fruit in all of your Bible reading. You will be slowing down on other "hinge words/phrases" like "so that" (992x), "but," (4108x), "for" (>7000x but only where you can substitute "because"), "therefore," (903x) and even the little coordinating conjunction "and" (which does not usually get much respect but is found >20,000x some uses being very strategic). 

These things in Gospel of John - Jn. 1:28; Jn. 2:16; Jn. 2:18; Jn. 3:9; Jn. 3:10; Jn. 3:22; Jn. 5:1; Jn. 5:16; Jn. 5:19; Jn. 5:34; Jn. 6:1; Jn. 6:59; Jn. 7:1; Jn. 7:4; Jn. 7:9; Jn. 7:32; Jn. 8:28; Jn. 8:30; Jn. 9:40; Jn. 11:43; Jn. 12:16; Jn. 12:36; Jn. 12:41; Jn. 13:17; Jn. 14:25; Jn. 15:11; Jn. 15:21; Jn. 16:1; Jn. 16:3; Jn. 16:4; Jn. 16:6; Jn. 16:25; Jn. 16:33; Jn. 17:1; Jn. 17:13; Jn. 19:25; Jn. 19:36; Jn. 19:38; Jn. 20:18; Jn. 21:1; Jn. 21:24

I have spoken to you - Jesus is addressing the 12, but one of the 12 would fail to hear "these things" and would stumble (fall away) into darkness and betrayal. 

So that (hina) - This phrase always introduces a purpose or result and thus is a valuable "hinge word" to open the door to the interpretation of a given passage. It begs the simple question of what is the writer's purpose or the result? Although the answer from the context may be obvious, intelligently interrogating the text is a very helpful discipline to develop to up your ability to read the Scriptures. And you will have plenty of opportunities to query the "so that's" because there are 991 uses in the NASB95. So what is Jesus' purpose (or result he desires) in this context? 

You may be kept from stumbling (skandalizo) -  More literally "that ye may not be stumbled" (Jn 16:1YLT) or "you may not be tripped up." 

NET NOTE - In Johannine thought the verb skandalizo means to trip up disciples and cause them to fall away from Jesus' company (Jn 6:61, 1John 2:10). Similar usage is found in Didache 16:5, an early Christian writing from around the beginning of the 2nd century A.D. An example of a disciple who falls away is Judas Iscariot. Here and again in Jn 16:4 Jesus gives the purpose (ED: cf so that) for his telling the disciples about coming persecution: He informs them so that when it happens, the disciples will not fall away, which in this context would refer to the confusion and doubt which they would certainly experience when such persecution began. There may have been a tendency for the disciples to expect immediately after Jesus' victory over death the institution of the messianic kingdom, particularly in light of the turn of events recorded in the early chapters of Acts. Jesus here forestalls such disillusionment for the disciples by letting them know in advance that they will face persecution (cf 2Ti 3:12) and even martyrdom as they seek to carry on his mission in the world after his departure. This material has parallels in the Olivet Discourse (Matt 24–25) and the synoptic parallels. 


Stumbling (4624skandalizo from skandalon= a trap = put a snare or stumbling block in way; English = scandalize = to offend the moral sense of) means to put a snare (in the way), hence to cause to stumble, to give offense. To entrap, trip up, or entice to sin, offend. So here in Mt 5:29-30 skandalizo is used in the active sense which conveys the idea to cause to do wrong, to entice to commit sin. In the passive sense it be means to be led into sin, to be caused to do wrong. In the passive some uses mean to be offended (Mt 11:6), the idea being that one is taking offense at Jesus and/or refusing to believe in Him. Finally, skandalizo can mean to furnish an occasion for some to be shocked, angered, or offended (Mt 17:27).

Skandalizo - 27v - cause(1), cause...to stumble(2), causes(2), causes...to stumble(6), fall away(7), falls away(1), led into sin(1), makes...stumble(2), offend(1), offended(1), stumble(3), stumbling(1), take(1), take offense(1), took offense(2). Matt. 5:29; Matt. 5:30; Matt. 11:6; Matt. 13:21; Matt. 13:57; Matt. 15:12; Matt. 17:27; Matt. 18:6; Matt. 18:8; Matt. 18:9; Matt. 24:10; Matt. 26:31; Matt. 26:33; Mk. 4:17; Mk. 6:3; Mk. 9:42; Mk. 9:43; Mk. 9:45; Mk. 9:47; Mk. 14:27; Mk. 14:29; Lk. 7:23; Lk. 17:2; Jn. 6:61; Jn. 16:1; 1 Co. 8:13; 2 Co. 11:29

John 16:2 “They will make you outcasts from the synagogue, but an hour is coming for everyone who kills you to think that he is offering service to God.

  • shall: John 9:22,34 12:42 Lu 6:22 1Co 4:13 
  • the time: Isa 65:5 Mt 10:28 24:9 Ac 5:33 6:13,14 7:56-60 8:1-3 9:1,2 Ac 22:3,4,19-23 26:9-11 Ro 10:2,3 Ga 1:13,14 Php 3:6 

Related Passage:

John 9:22, 34+  His parents said this because they were afraid of the Jews; for the Jews had already agreed that if anyone confessed Him to be Christ, he was to be put out of the synagogue...They answered him, “You were born entirely in sins, and are you teaching us?” So they put him out.

They will make you outcasts from the synagogue - Who is "they?" In context (synagogue), this is the Jewish religious leaders. This was the great fear of the parents of the healed blind man in John 9:18-21, 22.

but an hour is coming for everyone who kills you to think that he is offering service to God.

NET NOTE - Jesus now refers not to the time of his return to the Father, as he has frequently done up to this point, but to the disciples' time of persecution. They will be excommunicated from Jewish synagogues. There will even be a time when those who kill Jesus' disciples will think that they are offering service to God by putting the disciples to death. Because of the reference to service offered to God, it is almost certain that Jewish opposition is intended here in both cases rather than Jewish opposition in the first instance (putting the disciples out of synagogues) and Roman opposition in the second (putting the disciples to death). Such opposition materializes later and is recorded in Acts: The stoning of Stephen in 7:58–60 and the slaying of James the brother of John by Herod Agrippa I in Acts 12:2–3 are notable examples. 

John 16:3 “These things they will do because they have not known the Father or Me.

  • because: John 8:19,55 15:21,23 17:3,25 Lu 10:22 1Co 2:8 2Co 4:3-6 2Th 1:8 2Th 2:10-12 1Ti 1:13 1Jn 3:1 4:8 5:20 

These things they will do because they have not known the Father or Me

NET NOTE - Ignorance of Jesus and ignorance of the Father are also linked in 8:19; to know Jesus would be to know the Father also, but since the world does not know Jesus, neither does it know his Father. The world’s ignorance of the Father is also mentioned in 8:55, 15:21, and 17:25.

John 16:4 “But these things I have spoken to you, so that when their hour comes, you may remember that I told you of them. These things I did not say to you at the beginning, because I was with you.

  • that when: John 13:19 14:29 Isa 41:22,23 Mt 10:7 24:25 Mk 13:23 Lu 21:12,13 Ac 9:16 20:23,24 2Pe 1:14 
  • because: John 17:12,13 Mt 9:15 Mk 2:19 

But these things I have spoken to you, so that when their hour comes, you may remember that I told you of them. These things I did not say to you at the beginning, because I was with you

NET NOTE - This verse serves as a transition between the preceding discussion of the persecutions the disciples will face in the world after the departure of Jesus, and the following discussion concerning the departure of Jesus and the coming of the Spirit-Paraclete. Jesus had not told the disciples these things from the beginning because he was with them.

John 16:5 “But now I am going to Him who sent Me; and none of you asks Me, ‘Where are You going?’

  • I: John 16:10,16,28 6:62 7:33 13:3 14:28 17:4,13 Eph 4:7-11 Heb 1:3 12:2 
  • Whither: John 13:36 14:4-6 

But now I am going to Him who sent Me; and none of you asks Me, ‘Where are You going

NET NOTE -  Now the theme of Jesus’ impending departure is resumed (I am going to the one who sent me). It will also be mentioned in 16:10, 17, and 28. Jesus had said to his opponents in 7:33 that he was going to the one who sent him; in 13:33 he had spoken of going where the disciples could not come. At that point Peter had inquired where he was going, but it appears that Peter did not understand Jesus’ reply at that time and did not persist in further questioning. In 14:5 Thomas had asked Jesus where he was going. Now none of the disciples asks Jesus where he is going, and the reason is given in the following verse: They have been overcome with sadness as a result of the predictions of coming persecution that Jesus has just spoken to them in 15:18–25 and 16:1–4a. Their shock at Jesus’ revelation of coming persecution is so great that none of them thinks to ask him where it is that he is going.

John 16:6 “But because I have said these things to you, sorrow has filled your heart.

  • John 16:20-22 14:1,27,28 20:11-15 Lu 22:45 24:17 

But because I have said these things to you, sorrow has filled your heart

John 16:7 “But I tell you the truth, it is to your advantage that I go away; for if I do not go away, the Helper will not come to you; but if I go, I will send Him to you.

  • I tell: John 8:45,46 Lu 4:25 9:27 Ac 10:34 
  • It: John 11:50-52 14:3,28 Ro 8:28 2Co 4:17 
  • the Helper will not come to you: John 7:39 14:16,17,26 15:26 
  • but: Ps 68:18 Lu 24:49 Ac 1:4,5 2:33 Eph 4:8-13 

THE CAVEAT FOR THE 
COMING OF THE COMFORTER

But I tell you the truth, it is to your advantage that I go away; for if I do not go away, the Helper (parakletos) will not come to you; but if I go, I will send Him to you


Helper (Advocate, Comforter) (3875parakletos from para = side of, alongside, beside + kaleo = to call) is the noun cognate of the verb parakaleo (see study) (cf also paraklesis) and literally means one called alongside. Parakletos describes one who stands by to help or render aid (especially in a court of law) or one who is summoned to the side of another to help, comfort, encourage, counsel, or intercede for, depending on the need. The KJV, YLT translate parakletos as Comforter; the RV retains the word Comforter, but the margin gives Advocate and Helper and notes that the Greek is paraclete. The HCSB and RSV translate it Counselor. J. B. Phillips translates it someone to stand by you. Knox translates it he who is to befriend you. NAS, ESV, Moffatt, Torrey and 20th Century NT all translate it Helper. NET, NLT and NAB translate it as Advocate (even Jn 14:16). As the NET Note below amplifies, none of these Names are perfect. I would suggest that the Spirit might also be called our Enabler, that is, the One Who supernaturally energizes (enables) us for Christ-like life and ministry. The point is that we don't just need a little "help" (cp Name "Helper") or a little push, but we need Him to give us both "the desire and the power" (NLT paraphrase of Php 2:13NLT+) to obey the present tense command to continually work out our salvation (Phil 2:12+), whether in everyday Christian living or in specific ministries to which He has assigned each and every believer. I personally believe there are no "bench players" on God's team, but that every believer is called to be on the field so to speak, activity involved in the great game of redeeming men's soul's from hell to heaven!

Parakletos - 5x/5v - Advocate(1), Helper(4). (KJV =  comforter 4, advocate 1) - Jn. 14:16; Jn. 14:26; Jn. 15:26; Jn. 16:7; 1 Jn. 2:1

Related Resources on Parakletos:

John 16:8 And He, when He comes, will convict the world concerning sin and righteousness and judgment;

  • He will: Zec 12:10 Ac 2:37 16:29,30 
  • Convict, John 8:9,46 1Co 14:24 Jude 1:15 

THE SPIRIT:
THE "CONVICTOR"

And He, when He comes, will convict (elegchothe world (kosmos) concerning sin (hamartia) and righteousness (dikaiosune and judgment (krisis) - 


Convict (expose) (1651elegcho or elencho is a primary verb but is related to elegchos = bringing to light) means to bring to the light (to reveal hidden things) with the implication that there is adequate proof of wrongdoing. To expose, to convict, to reprove, to shame or disgrace and thus to rebuke another in such a way that they are compelled to see and to admit the error of their ways. To show someone that they have done something wrong and summon them to repent.

Gary Hill on elegcho - properly, to convince by solid, compelling evidence which especially exposes what is wrong or right....preeminently used of the Holy Spirit producing conviction in the heart. The Holy Spirit produces inner conviction, i.e. convinces people about what: misses God's mark ("sin"); has His approval ("righteousness"); and the eternal consequences of this (for everlasting punishment or reward). We constantly need the Holy Spirit to convict us about what is right as well as what is wrong so we don't hate what is wrong . . . more than love what is right! (The Discovery Bible)

Elegcho - 17v - convict(2), convicted(2), convicts(1), expose(1), exposed(2), rebuke(1), refute(1), reprimanded(1), reprove(4), reproved(1), show...fault(1). Matt. 18:15; Lk. 3:19; Jn. 3:20; Jn. 8:46; Jn. 16:8; 1 Co. 14:24; Eph. 5:11; Eph. 5:13; 1 Tim. 5:20; 2 Tim. 4:2; Tit. 1:9; Tit. 1:13; Tit. 2:15; Heb. 12:5; Jas. 2:9; Jude 1:15; Rev. 3:19

World (2889kosmos related to the verb kosmeo = to order or adorn, to put in order [Mt 25:7 = "trimmed"], to adorn literally [1Ti 2:9], to adorn figuratively [Titus 2:9+]) means essentially something that is well-arranged, that which has order or something arranged harmoniously. Kosmos refers to an ordered system or a system where order prevails. As explained below however, kosmos as used here in James 4:4 and many places in the NT, takes on a considerably more negative shade of meaning. In this sense kosmos is much like the Greek word for flesh (sarx), which can be a neutral word, but which many times in the NT takes on an evil connotation.

Related Resources:

Kosmos in John's writings -  Jn. 1:9; Jn. 1:10; Jn. 1:29; Jn. 3:16; Jn. 3:17; Jn. 3:19; Jn. 4:42; Jn. 6:14; Jn. 6:33; Jn. 6:51; Jn. 7:4; Jn. 7:7; Jn. 8:12; Jn. 8:23; Jn. 8:26; Jn. 9:5; Jn. 9:39; Jn. 10:36; Jn. 11:9; Jn. 11:27; Jn. 12:19; Jn. 12:25; Jn. 12:31; Jn. 12:46; Jn. 12:47; Jn. 13:1; Jn. 14:17; Jn. 14:19; Jn. 14:22; Jn. 14:27; Jn. 14:30; Jn. 14:31; Jn. 15:18; Jn. 15:19; Jn. 16:8; Jn. 16:11; Jn. 16:20; Jn. 16:21; Jn. 16:28; Jn. 16:33; Jn. 17:5; Jn. 17:6; Jn. 17:9; Jn. 17:11; Jn. 17:13; Jn. 17:14; Jn. 17:15; Jn. 17:16; Jn. 17:18; Jn. 17:21; Jn. 17:23; Jn. 17:24; Jn. 17:25; Jn. 18:20; Jn. 18:36; Jn. 18:37; Jn. 21:25; 1 Jn. 2:2; 1 Jn. 2:15; 1 Jn. 2:16; 1 Jn. 2:17; 1 Jn. 3:1; 1 Jn. 3:13; 1 Jn. 3:17; 1 Jn. 4:1; 1 Jn. 4:3; 1 Jn. 4:4; 1 Jn. 4:5; 1 Jn. 4:9; 1 Jn. 4:14; 1 Jn. 4:17; 1 Jn. 5:4; 1 Jn. 5:5; 1 Jn. 5:19; 2 Jn. 1:7; Rev. 11:15; Rev. 13:8; Rev. 17:8

Sin (266hamartia  literally conveys the idea of missing the mark as when hunting with a bow and arrow (in Homer some hundred times of a warrior hurling his spear but missing his foe). Later hamartia came to mean missing or falling short of any goal, standard, or purpose. Hamartia in the Bible signifies a departure from God's holy, perfect standard of what is right in word or deed (righteous). It pictures the idea of missing His appointed goal (His will) which results in a deviation from what is pleasing to Him. In short, sin is conceived as a missing the true end and scope of our lives, which is the Triune God Himself. As Martin Luther put it "Sin is essentially a departure from God."

Remember that a "low view of sin" will lead to a "low view of salvation". In fact a failure to understand the true nature of sin as God sees it (and describes it in Scripture), can result in a false understanding of salvation (cp Mt 7:21-note, Mt 7:22, 23-note - Observe that they "practice [present tense = continually, as their lifestyle, as the general "direction" of their life] lawlessness" which 1Jn3:4 defines as sin!). Sinners need to be confronted boldly and head on with the sinfulness of their personal sins against the holy God, so that they might from a sense of anguish, deep despair and utter hopelessness and helplessness, be motivated (the Spirit of course "superintends" the entire process, Jn 3:5, 6, 7, 8, Jn 16:8, 1Pe 1:2-note, 2Th 2:13, Titus 3:5-note) to humble themselves and cry out to God and His Son for salvation (cp Peter when he knew he was drowning - Mt 14:30! The Philippian jailer - Acts 16:30, 31, Zaccheus - Lk 19:1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, Two men - one who had a true understanding of sin - Lk 18:9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. Cp OT pictures - Ps 3:7, 8, 6:4, 55:16, Jer 17:14, Naaman - 2Ki 5:10, 11, 12, 13, 14)

Hamartia in John - Jn. 1:29; Jn. 8:21; Jn. 8:24; Jn. 8:34; Jn. 8:46; Jn. 9:34; Jn. 9:41; Jn. 15:22; Jn. 15:24; Jn. 16:8; Jn. 16:9; Jn. 19:11; Jn. 20:23;

Righteousness (1343) (dikaiosune from dikaios = being proper or right in the sense of being fully justified being or in accordance with what God requires) is the quality of being upright. In its simplest sense dikaiosune conveys the idea of conformity to a standard or norm and in Biblical terms the "standard" is God and His perfect, holy character. In this sense righteousness is the opposite of hamartia (sin), which is defined as missing of the mark set by God. Dikaiosune is rightness of character before God and rightness of actions before men. Righteousness of God could be succinctly stated as all that God is, all that He commands, all that He demands, all that He approves, all that He provides through Christ (Click here to read Pastor Ray Pritchard's interesting analysis of righteousness in the Gospel of Matthew).

Judgment (justice, court, sentence)(2920krisis  from krino = to judge, decide) means a decision or judgment, verdict, justice, court (tribunal). The first use is by Jesus in the Sermon on the Mount declaring "‘Whoever commits murder shall be liable to the court." ("in danger of judgment") (Mt 5:21, cp also Mt 5:22) Mt 10:15, 11:22, 24 all describe Jesus' sobering warning to the Jews of a specific future and frightening "day of judgment." (cp "sentence of hell" Mt 23:33, see also 2 Peter 2:9, 11, 3:7, 1 John 4:17) In Jn 5:24 Jesus gives sinners the way of escape, the way to miss the horrible day of judgment (Heb 10:27)! In Mt 12:18 God's judgment is equated with justice, for He is the righteous and just Judge (cp Mt 12:20, 23:23, Rev 16:7). Note the striking contrast in Jn 5:29 "those who did the good deeds to a resurrection of life, those who committed the evil deeds to a resurrection of judgment." There is no such thing as reincarnation but only one life, one death, one judgment (Heb 9:27)

John 16:9 concerning sin, because they do not believe in Me;

  • John 3:18-21 5:40-44 8:23,24,42-47 12:47,48 15:22-25 Mk 16:16 Ac 2:22-38 3:14-19 7:51-54 26:9,10 Ro 3:19,20 7:9 1Th 2:15,16 1Ti 1:13 Heb 3:12 10:28,29 

Related Passages:

John 3:19+ “This is the judgment, that the Light has come into the world, and men loved the darkness rather than the Light, for their deeds were evil.

John 12:37+ But though He had performed so many signs before them, yet they were not believing in Him.

concerning sin (hamartia),

because they do not believe in Me

NET NOTE on because (hoti) - It is very difficult to determine whether ὅτι (hoti; 3 times in 16:9, 10, 11) should be understood as causal or appositional/explanatory: Brown and Bultmann favor appositional or explanatory, while Barrett and Morris prefer a causal sense. A causal idea is preferable here, since it also fits the parallel statements in vv. 10–11 better than an appositional or explanatory use would. In this case Jesus is stating in each instance the reason why the world is proven guilty or wrong by the Spirit-Paraclete.

NET NOTE - Here (v. 9) the world is proven guilty concerning sin, and the reason given is their refusal to believe in Jesus. In Jn 3:19 the effect of Jesus coming into the world as the Light of the world was to provoke judgment, by forcing people to choose up sides for or against him, and they chose darkness rather than light. In Jn 12:37, at the very end of Jesus’ public ministry in John’s Gospel, people were still refusing to believe in him.


Believe (4100pisteuo from pistispistos; related studies the faith, the obedience of faith) means to consider something to be true and therefore worthy of one’s trust. To accept as true, genuine, or real. To have a firm conviction as to the goodness, efficacy, or ability of something or someone. To consider to be true. To accept the word or evidence of. Pisteuo means to entrust oneself to an entity in complete confidence. To believe in with the implication of total commitment to the one who is trusted. As discussed below Christ is the object of this type of faith that relies on His power and nearness to help, in addition to being convinced that His revelations or disclosures are true. Pisteuo can refer to an "heart belief" (saving faith, genuine belief that leads to salvation, this believing involves not only the consent of the mind, but an act of the heart and will of the subject) or an intellectual belief (mental assent, "head" knowledge, not associated with bringing salvation if it is by itself), both uses demonstrated by Jesus statement in John 11:26+, "Everyone who lives and believes (pisteuo - refers to genuine saving faith) in Me shall never die. Do you believe (pisteuo- intellectually) this?"

Related Resources on faith:

Pisteuo in John's writings - MOST USES IN NT ARE IN GOSPEL OF JOHN  Jn. 1:7; Jn. 1:12; Jn. 1:50; Jn. 2:11; Jn. 2:22; Jn. 2:23; Jn. 2:24; Jn. 3:12; Jn. 3:15; Jn. 3:16; Jn. 3:18; Jn. 3:36; Jn. 4:21; Jn. 4:39; Jn. 4:41; Jn. 4:42; Jn. 4:48; Jn. 4:50; Jn. 4:53; Jn. 5:24; Jn. 5:38; Jn. 5:44; Jn. 5:46; Jn. 5:47; Jn. 6:29; Jn. 6:30; Jn. 6:35; Jn. 6:36; Jn. 6:40; Jn. 6:47; Jn. 6:64; Jn. 6:69; Jn. 7:5; Jn. 7:31; Jn. 7:38; Jn. 7:39; Jn. 7:48; Jn. 8:24; Jn. 8:30; Jn. 8:31; Jn. 8:45; Jn. 8:46; Jn. 9:18; Jn. 9:35; Jn. 9:36; Jn. 9:38; Jn. 10:25; Jn. 10:26; Jn. 10:37; Jn. 10:38; Jn. 10:42; Jn. 11:15; Jn. 11:25; Jn. 11:26; Jn. 11:27; Jn. 11:40; Jn. 11:42; Jn. 11:45; Jn. 11:48; Jn. 12:11; Jn. 12:36; Jn. 12:37; Jn. 12:38; Jn. 12:39; Jn. 12:42; Jn. 12:44; Jn. 12:46; Jn. 13:19; Jn. 14:1; Jn. 14:10; Jn. 14:11; Jn. 14:12; Jn. 14:29; Jn. 16:9; Jn. 16:27; Jn. 16:30; Jn. 16:31; Jn. 17:8; Jn. 17:20; Jn. 17:21; Jn. 19:35; Jn. 20:8; Jn. 20:25; Jn. 20:29; Jn. 20:31; 1 Jn. 3:23; 1 Jn. 4:1; 1 Jn. 4:16; 1 Jn. 5:1; 1 Jn. 5:5; 1 Jn. 5:10; 1 Jn. 5:13

John 16:10 and concerning righteousness, because I go to the Father and you no longer see Me;

  • righteousness: Isa 42:21 45:24,25 Jer 23:5,6 Da 9:24 Ac 2:32 Ro 1:17 3:21-26 Ro 5:17-21 8:33,34 10:3,4 1Co 1:30 15:14-20 2Co 5:21 Ga 5:5 Php 3:7-9 1Ti 3:16 Heb 10:5-13 
  • because: John 3:14 5:32 

and concerning righteousness (dikaiosune), because I go to the Father and you no longer see Me

This verse begs the question as to how the Spirit will convict the world concerning righteousness if the Righteous One is no longer "con carne" (in the flesh)? One answer is that the world will see the disciples (and all followers of Christ) who will have the Righteous One living in them and who have the Spirit of Christ indwelling them and empowering them to live righteously before lost sinners who are living unrighteously. Have you ever noticed how when you are speaking with someone and they drop the Name "Jesus" as a curse word and then catch themselves and say something like "I'm sorry," or "Excuse me?" Why are they ashamed or embarrassed? Because they have seen your righteous life practiced in real-time and they know that this offends your heart. I submit that they have been convicted concerning righteousness

NET NOTE - There are two questions that need to be answered: (1) what is the meaning of δικαιοσύνη (dikaiosunē) in this context, and (2) to whom does it pertain—to the world, or to someone else? (1) The word δικαιοσύνη occurs in the Gospel of John only here and in v. 8. It is often assumed that it refers to forensic justification, as it does so often in Paul’s writings. Thus the answer to question (2) would be that it refers to the world. L. Morris states, “The Spirit shows men (and no-one else can do this) that their righteousness before God depends not on their own efforts but on Christ’s atoning work for them” (John [NICNT], 699). Since the word occurs so infrequently in the Fourth Gospel, however, the context must be examined very carefully. The ὅτι (hoti) clause which follows provides an important clue: The righteousness in view here has to do with Jesus’ return to the Father and his absence from the disciples. It is true that in the Fourth Gospel part of what is involved in Jesus’ return to the Father is the cross, and it is through his substitutionary death that people are justified, so that Morris’ understanding of righteousness here is possible. But more basic than this is the idea that Jesus’ return to the Father constitutes his own δικαιοσύνη in the sense of vindication rather than forensic justification. Jesus had repeatedly claimed oneness with the Father, and his opponents had repeatedly rejected this and labeled him a deceiver, a sinner, and a blasphemer (John 5:18, 7:12, 9:24, 10:33, etc.). But Jesus, by his glorification through his return to the Father, is vindicated in his claims in spite of his opponents. In his vindication his followers are also vindicated as well, but their vindication derives from his. Thus one would answer question (1) by saying that in context δικαιοσύνης (dikaiosunēs) refers not to forensic justification but vindication, and question (2) by referring this justification/vindication not to the world or even to Christians directly, but to Jesus himself. Finally, how does Jesus’ last statement in v. 10, that the disciples will see him no more, contribute to this? It is probably best taken as a reference to the presence of the Spirit-Paraclete, who cannot come until Jesus has departed (16:7). The meaning of v. 10 is thus: When the Spirit-Paraclete comes he will prove the world wrong concerning the subject of righteousness, namely, Jesus’ righteousness which is demonstrated when he is glorified in his return to the Father and the disciples see him no more (but they will have instead the presence of the Spirit-Paraclete, whom the world is not able to receive).

John 16:11 and concerning judgment, because the ruler of this world has been judged. 

  • judgment: John 5:22-27 Mt 12:18,36 Ac 10:42 17:30,31 24:25 26:18 Ro 2:2-4,16 Ro 14:10-12 1Co 4:5 6:3,4 2Co 5:10,11 Heb 6:2 9:27 2Pe 2:4-9 2Pe 3:7 Rev 1:7 20:11-15 
  • the: John 12:31 Jn 14:30 Ge 3:15 Ps 68:18 Isa 49:24-26 Lu 10:18 Ro 16:20 2Co 4:4 Eph 2:2 Col 2:15 Heb 2:14 1Jn 3:8 Rev 12:7-10 20:2,3,10 

Related Passages

John 12:31+  “Now judgment is upon this world; now the ruler of this world will be cast out.

John 14:30+ “I will not speak much more with you, for the ruler of the world is coming, and he has nothing in Me;

1 John 5:19+ We know that we are of God, and that the whole world lies in the power of the evil one.

SATAN HAS 
BEEN JUDGED

and concerning judgment (krisis), because the ruler of this world (kosmoshas been judged

NET NOTE - The world is proven wrong concerning judgment, because the ruler of this world has been judged. Jesus’ righteousness before the Father, as proven by his return to the Father, his glorification, constitutes a judgment against Satan. This is parallel to the judgment of the world which Jesus provokes in 3:19–21: Jesus’ presence in the world as the Light of the world provokes the judgment of those in the world, because as they respond to the light (either coming to Jesus or rejecting him) so are they judged. That judgment is in a sense already realized. So it is here, where the judgment of Satan is already realized in Jesus’ glorification. This does not mean that Satan does not continue to be active in the world, and to exercise some power over it, just as in 3:19–21 the people in the world who have rejected Jesus and thus incurred judgment continue on in their opposition to Jesus for a time. In both cases the judgment is not immediately executed. But it is certain.

John 16:12 “I have many more things to say to you, but you cannot bear them now.

  • yet: John 14:30 15:15 Ac 1:3 
  • ye: Mk 4:33 1Co 3:1,2 Heb 5:11-14 

I have many more things to say to you, but you cannot bear them now.

NET NOTE -  In what sense does Jesus have many more things to say to the disciples? Does this imply the continuation of revelation after his departure? This is probably the case, especially in light of v. 13 and following, which describe the work of the Holy Spirit in guiding the disciples into all truth. Thus Jesus was saying that he would continue to speak (to the twelve, at least) after his return to the Father. He would do this through the Holy Spirit whom he was going to send. It is possible that an audience broader than the twelve is addressed, and in the Johannine tradition there is evidence that later other Christians (or perhaps, professed Christians) claimed to be recipients of revelation through the Spirit-Paraclete (1 John 4:1–6).

John 16:13 “But when He, the Spirit of truth, comes, He will guide you into all the truth; for He will not speak on His own initiative, but whatever He hears, He will speak; and He will disclose to you what is to come.

  • Spirit: John 14:17 15:26 1Jn 4:6 
  • will guide: John 14:26 1Co 2:10-13 Eph 4:7-15 1Jn 2:20,27 
  • for: John 3:32 7:16-18 8:38 12:49 
  • he will show: Joe 2:28 Ac 2:17,18 11:28 20:23 21:9-11 27:24 2Th 2:3,12 1Ti 4:1-3 2Ti 3:1-5 2Pe 2:1-22 Rev 1:1,19 6:1-17 22:1-21

THE SPIRIT OF TRUTH
WILL GUIDE, SPEAK & DISCLOSE

But when He, the Spirit of truth, comes, He will guide you into all the truth; for He will not speak on His own initiative, but whatever He hears, He will speak; and He will disclose to you what is to come 

NET NOTE - Three important points must be noted here. (1) When the Holy Spirit comes, he will guide the disciples into all truth. What Jesus had said in John 8:31–32, “If you continue to follow my teaching you are really my disciples, and you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free,” will ultimately be realized in the ongoing ministry of the Holy Spirit to the disciples after Jesus’ departure. (2) The things the Holy Spirit speaks to them will not be things which originate from himself (he will not speak on his own authority), but things he has heard. This could be taken to mean that no new revelation is involved, as R. E. Brown does (John [AB], 2:714–15). This is a possible but not a necessary inference. The point here concerns the source of the things the Spirit will say to the disciples and does not specifically exclude originality of content. (3) Part at least of what the Holy Spirit will reveal to the disciples will concern what is to come, not just fuller implications of previous sayings of Jesus and the like. This does seem to indicate that at least some new revelation is involved. But the Spirit is not the source or originator of these things—Jesus is the source, and he will continue to speak to his disciples through the Spirit who has come to indwell them. This does not answer the question, however, whether these words are addressed to all followers of Jesus, or only to his apostles. Different modern commentators will answer this question differently. Since in the context of the Farewell Discourse Jesus is preparing the twelve to carry on his ministry after his departure, it is probably best to take these statements as specifically related only to the twelve. Some of this the Holy Spirit does directly for all believers today; other parts of this statement are fulfilled through the apostles (e.g., in giving the Book of Revelation the Spirit speaks through the apostles to the church today of things to come). One of the implications of this is that a doctrine does not have to be traced back to an explicit teaching of Jesus to be authentic; all that is required is apostolic authority.

John 16:14 “He will glorify Me, for He will take of Mine and will disclose it to you.

  • glorify: John 16:9,10 Ac 2:32-36 4:10-12 1Co 12:3 1Pe 1:10-12 2:7 1Jn 4:1-3,13,14 5:6 
  • for: John 15:26 Zec 12:10 1Co 2:8-10 2Co 3:14-18 4:6 Ga 5:5 1Jn 3:23,24 1Jn 4:13,14 5:20 Rev 19:10 

THE FLOODLIGHT MINISTRY
OF THE HOLY SPIRIT 

He will glorify Me, for He will take of Mine and will disclose it to you

J I Packer's illustration of Spirit's role to glorify Jesus -  The Holy Spirit's distinctive role is to fulfill what we may call a floodlight ministry in relation to the Lord Jesus Christ. So far as this role was concerned, the Spirit "was not yet" (John 7:29, literal Greek) while Jesus was on earth; only when the Father had glorified him (John 17:1, 5) could the Spirit's work of making men aware of Jesus' glory begin. I remember walking to church one winter evening to preach on the words, "He will glorify me" (John 16:14), seeing the building floodlit as I turned a corner, and realizing that this was exactly the illustration my message needed. When floodlighting is well done, the floodlights are placed so that you do not see them; in fact, you are not supposed to see where the light is coming from; what you are meant to see is just the building on which the floodlights are trained. The intended effect is to make it visible when otherwise it would not be seen for the darkness, and to maximize its dignity by throwing all its details into relief so that you can see it properly. This perfectly illustrated the Spirit's new covenant role. He is, so to speak, the hidden flood light shining on the Savior. Or think of it this way. It is as if the Spirit stands behind us, throwing light over our shoulder on to Jesus who stands facing us. The Spirit's message to us is never, "Look at me; listen to me; come to me; get to know me", but always, "Look at him, and see his glory; listen to him and hear his word; go to him and have life; get to know him and taste his gift of joy and peace." The Spirit, we might say, is the matchmaker, the celestial marriage broker, whose role it is to bring us and Christ together and ensure that we stay together.  (James Packer, BORROW Your Father Loves You - Daily Insights for Knowing God

J I Packer adds "My conviction is that the key to understanding the experiential aspects of life in the Spirit is to be found in His work of making Jesus Christ, our crucified, risen, reigning Savior, real and glorious to us moment by moment (John 16:14). And I claim that John is referring to this ministry of the Spirit when he declares that “his anointing teaches you about everything” (everything, he means, concerning Jesus and his glory - 1Jn 2:27+), and leads us to “abide in him” (to maintain not just a true confession about him, but a disciple relationship to him as living Lord)."

John 16:15 “All things that the Father has are Mine; therefore I said that He takes of Mine and will disclose it to you.

  • John 3:35 10:29,30 13:3 17:2,10 Mt 11:27 28:18 Lu 10:22 Col 1:19 Col 2:3,9 

All things that the Father has are Mine;

Therefore I said that He takes of Mine - Therefore is a term of conclusion and explains for this reason (because all things are Jesus'). The Spirit will take and disclose these things.

And will disclose it to you - Disclose is anaggello which means to announce in detail, declare, make known, report, bring word (Jn 5:15, Jn 4:25). In the Septuagint it anagello is used in Ps 19:1 to describe "the heavens are declaring the glory of God"

John 16:16 “A little while, and you will no longer see Me; and again a little while, and you will see Me.”

  • A: John 16:5,10,17-19 7:33 12:35 13:33 14:19 
  • a little while: John 20:19-29 21:1-23 Ac 1:3 10:40,41 1Co 15:5-9 
  • (ONLY IN KJV) because I go to the Father: John 16:28 13:3 17:5,13 Mk 16:19 Heb 12:2 

A little while, and you will no longer see Me; and again a little while, and you will see Me

The statement "because I go to the Father" is found only in the Textus Receptus Greek manuscript, the one used to translate the KJV, but is not found in the more modern manuscripts (Nestle–Aland) which textual critics consider to be more accurate than the Textus Receptus. 

NET NOTE - The phrase after a little while, you will see me is sometimes taken to refer to the coming of the Holy Spirit after Jesus departs, but (as at 14:19) it is much more probable that it refers to the postresurrection appearances of Jesus to the disciples. There is no indication in the context that the disciples will see Jesus only with “spiritual” sight, as would be the case if the coming of the Spirit is in view.

John 16:17 Some of His disciples then said to one another, “What is this thing He is telling us, ‘A little while, and you will not see Me; and again a little while, and you will see Me’; and, ‘because I go to the Father’?”

  • said: John 16:1,5,19 12:16 14:5,22 Mk 9:10,32 Lu 9:45 18:34 

Some of His disciples (mathetes) then said to one another, “What is this thing He is telling us, ‘A little while, and you will not see Me; and again a little while, and you will see Me’; and, ‘because I go to the Father’

NET NOTE - These fragmentary quotations of Jesus’ statements are from 16:16 and 16:10, and indicate that the disciples heard only part of what Jesus had to say to them on this occasion.


Disciples (3101) mathetes from manthano = to learn which Vine says is "from a root math, indicating thought accompanied by endeavor". Gives us our English = "mathematics" - see matheteuo) describes a person who learns from another by instruction, whether formal or informal. Another sources says mathetes is from from math- which speaks of "mental effort that thinks something through" and thus describes is a learner; a follower who learns the doctrines and the lifestyle of the one they follow. Discipleship includes the idea of one who intentionally learns by inquiry and observation (cf inductive Bible study) and thus mathetes is more than a mere pupil. A mathetes describes an adherent of a teacher. As discussed below mathetes itself has no spiritual connotation, and it is used of superficial followers of Jesus as well as of genuine believers. The Lord calls everyone to grow as a disciple (a learner of Christ; cf. also Mt 11;29,30), one who lives in faith, who lives in and by His Word in the power of the Holy Spirit. Note in the Great Commission that the implication is that the disciple is not just a hearer and a learner from another, but is a doer of what he learns for Mt 28:20 says "teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age.”

Swindoll - A mathētēs is one who subjects himself or herself to a process of becoming familiarized with something by experiencing, learning, or receiving direction. This process usually implies the aid of another person, and as the term fully developed, it was inconceivable for one to be a learner without a guide or a master. The term is used to refer to the disciples of rabbis, and those of John the Baptizer, the Pharisees, and Moses (e.g., Mark 2:18; John 9:28). Although we often refer to the twelve apostles as the “twelve disciples,” it is important to recognize that this term often refers to all (ED: HOW MANY?) of Jesus’ followers (Luke 6:13, 17). (Insights on Luke )

There is a teaching which I consider a false teaching that not all genuine believers are also disciples of Christ and it is taught by a number of evangelicals, some of whom are very prominent. They teach that there are believers and then an "elite" group of believers who warrant the designation of "disciples." This is a false teaching! Period! 

John 16:18 So they were saying, “What is this that He says, ‘A little while’? We do not know what He is talking about.”

  • we: Mt 16:9-11 Lu 24:25 Heb 5:12 

So they were saying, “What is this that He says, ‘A little while’? We do not know what He is talking about.

John 16:19 Jesus knew that they wished to question Him, and He said to them, “Are you deliberating together about this, that I said, ‘A little while, and you will not see Me, and again a little while, and you will see Me’?

  • Jesus: John 16:30 2:24,25 21:17 Ps 139:1-4 Mt 6:8 9:4 Mk 9:33,34 Heb 4:13 Rev 2:23 
  • A little: John 16:16 7:33 13:33 14:19 

Jesus knew that they wished to question Him, and He said to them, “Are you deliberating together about this, that I said, ‘A little while, and you will not see Me, and again a little while, and you will see Me’

NET NOTE on Jesus knew - Jesus could see. Supernatural knowledge of what the disciples were thinking is not necessarily in view here. Given the disciples’ confused statements in the preceding verses, it was probably obvious to Jesus that they wanted to ask what he meant.

John 16:20 “Truly, truly, I say to you, that you will weep and lament, but the world will rejoice; you will grieve, but your grief will be turned into joy.

  • That: John 16:6,33 19:25-27 Mk 14:72 16:10 Lu 22:45,62 23:47-49 24:17,21 
  • but the: Job 20:5 Mt 21:38 27:39-44,62-66 Mk 15:29-32 Rev 11:10 18:7 
  • your: Ps 30:5,11 40:1-3 97:11 126:5,6 Isa 12:1 25:8,9 61:3 66:5 Jer 31:9-14,25 Mt 5:4 Lu 6:21 Ac 2:46,47 5:41 Ro 5:2,3,11 2Co 6:10 Ga 5:22 1Th 1:6 2Th 2:16,17 Jas 1:2 1Pe 1:6-8 Jude 1:24 Rev 7:14-17 

Truly, truly, I say to you, that you will weep and lament, but the world (kosmoswill rejoice; you will grieve, but your grief will be turned into joy.

John 16:21 “Whenever a woman is in labor she has pain, because her hour has come; but when she gives birth to the child, she no longer remembers the anguish because of the joy that a child has been born into the world.

  • woman: Ge 3:16 Isa 26:16-18 Jer 30:6,7 Ho 13:13,14 Mic 4:10 Rev 12:2-5 
  • for: Ge 21:6,7 30:23,24 1Sa 1:26,27 Ps 113:9 Lu 1:57,58 Ga 4:27 

Whenever a woman is in labor she has pain, because her hour has come; but when she gives birth to the child, she no longer remembers the anguish because of the joy that a child has been born into the world (kosmos

NET NOTE - Jesus now compares the situation of the disciples to a woman in childbirth. Just as the woman in the delivery of her child experiences real pain and anguish (has distress), so the disciples will also undergo real anguish at the crucifixion of Jesus. But once the child has been born, the mother’s anguish is turned into joy, and she forgets the past suffering. The same will be true of the disciples, who after Jesus’ resurrection and reappearance to them will forget the anguish they suffered at his death on account of their joy.

John 16:22 “Therefore you too have grief now; but I will see you again, and your heart will rejoice, and no one will take your joy away from you.

  • ye now: John 16:6,20 
  • But: John 14:1,27 20:19,20 21:7 Isa 25:9 65:13,14 66:9-14 Mt 28:8 Lu 24:41,51-53 Ac 2:46 13:52 1Pe 1:8 
  • and your: John 4:14 Job 34:29 Ps 146:2 Isa 12:2-4 51:11,12 54:7,8 65:18,19 Hab 3:17,18 Lu 10:42 16:25 19:26 Ac 5:41 16:25 20:23,24 Ro 8:35-39 1Th 3:7-9 2Th 2:16 Heb 6:18 10:34 1Pe 1:8 4:13,14 

Therefore you too have grief now; but I will see you again, and your heart will rejoice, and no one will take your joy away from you.

NET NOTE - An allusion to Isa 66:14 LXX, which reads: “Then you will see, and your heart will be glad, and your bones will flourish like the new grass; and the hand of the LORD will be made known to his servants, but he will be indignant toward his enemies.” The change from “you will see [me]” to I will see you places more emphasis on Jesus as the one who reinitiates the relationship with the disciples after his resurrection, but v. 16 (you will see me) is more like Isa 66:14. Further support for seeing this allusion as intentional is found in Isa 66:7, which uses the same imagery of the woman giving birth found in John 16:21. In the context of Isa 66 the passages refer to the institution of the messianic kingdom, and in fact the last clause of 66:14 along with the following verses (15–17) have yet to be fulfilled. This is part of the tension of present and future eschatological fulfillment that runs throughout the NT, by virtue of the fact that there are two advents. Some prophecies are fulfilled or partially fulfilled at the first advent, while other prophecies or parts of prophecies await fulfillment at the second.

John 16:23 “In that day you will not question Me about anything. Truly, truly, I say to you, if you ask the Father for anything in My name, He will give it to you. 

  • ask: John 16:19 13:36,37 14:5,22 15:15 21:20,21 
  • Whatsoever: John 14:13,14 15:7,16 Isa 65:24 Mt 7:7 21:22 Eph 2:18 3:14-20 1Ti 2:5,6 Heb 4:14-16 7:25,26 10:19-23 1Jn 2:1 5:14-16 

Related Passages:

John 15:16  “You did not choose Me but I chose you, and appointed you that you would go and bear fruit, and that your fruit would remain, so that whatever you ask of the Father in My name He may give to you.

In that day you will not question Me about anything. Truly, truly, I say to you, if you ask the Father for anything in My name, He will give it to you

John 16:24 “Until now you have asked for nothing in My name; ask and you will receive, so that your joy may be made full.

  • in: Ge 32:9 1Ki 18:36 2Ki 19:15 Mt 6:9 Eph 1:16,17 1Th 3:11-13 2Th 1:2 2:16,17 
  • ask: Mt 7:7,8 Jas 4:2,3 
  • that: John 16:23 15:11 1Jn 1:3,4 2Jn 1:12 

Until now you have asked for nothing in My name; ask and you will receive, so that your joy may be made full

John 16:25 “These things I have spoken to you in figurative language; an hour is coming when I will no longer speak to you in figurative language, but will tell you plainly of the Father.

  • figurative language, John 16:12,16,17 Ps 49:4 78:2 Pr 1:6 Mt 13:10,11,34,35 Mk 4:13 
  • but: John 16:28,29 Ac 2:33-36 2Co 3:12-18 4:2 

These things I have spoken to you in figurative language; an hour is coming when I will no longer speak to you in figurative language, but will tell (inform) you plainly (openly) of the Father.

NET NOTE on figurative language - Or “in parables”; or “in metaphors.” There is some difficulty in defining παροιμίαις (paroimiais) precisely: A translation like “parables” does not convey accurately the meaning. BDAG 779–80 s.v. παροιμία suggests in general “proverb, saw, maxim,” but for Johannine usage “veiled saying, figure of speech, in which esp. lofty ideas are concealed.” In the preceding context of the Farewell Discourse, Jesus has certainly used obscure language and imagery at times: John 13:8–11; 13:16; 15:1–17; and 16:21 could all be given as examples. In the LXX this word is used to translate the Hebrew mashal which covers a wide range of figurative speech, often containing obscure or enigmatic elements.

John 16:26 “In that day you will ask in My name, and I do not say to you that I will request of the Father on your behalf;

  • At: John 16:23 
  • that: John 14:16 17:9,19,24 Ro 8:34 

In that day you will ask in My name, and I do not say to you that I will request of the Father on your behalf

As God loved His only-begotten Son, so He loves His adopted sons (John 16:27). As God had fellowship with Jesus, so He does with us (1 John 1:3). As God exalted Jesus, so He exalts Jesus’ followers, as brothers and sisters in one family (John 12:32; 17:24). (J I Packer)

John 16:27 for the Father Himself loves you, because you have loved Me and have believed that I came forth from the Father.

  • the Father: John 14:21,23 17:23,26 Zep 3:17 Heb 12:6 Jude 1:20,21 Rev 3:9,19 
  • because: John 8:42 21:15-17 Mt 10:37 1Co 16:22 2Co 5:14 Eph 6:24 1Pe 1:8 1Jn 4:19 
  • and have: John 16:30 3:13 7:29 17:7,8,25 Ro 8:3 1Co 15:47 Ga 4:4 1Ti 1:15 

for the Father Himself loves you, because you have loved Me and have believed that I came forth from the Father

John 16:28 “I came forth from the Father and have come into the world; I am leaving the world again and going to the Father.”  

  • came: John 8:14 13:1,3 
  • I leave: John 16:5,16 14:28 17:5,11,13 Lu 9:51 24:51 Ac 1:9-11 

I came forth from the Father and have come into the world(kosmos; I am leaving the world again and going to the Father

NET NOTE - The statement I am leaving the world and going to the Father is a summary of the entire Gospel of John. It summarizes the earthly career of the Word made flesh, Jesus of Nazareth, on his mission from the Father to be the Savior of the world, beginning with his entry into the world as he came forth from God and concluding with his departure from the world as he returned to the Father.

John 16:29 His disciples said, “Lo, now You are speaking plainly and are not using a figure of speech.

  • figure of speech, John 16:25 

His disciples (mathetes) said, “Lo, now You are speaking plainly and are not using a figure of speech.

NET NOTE - How is the disciples’ reply to Jesus now you are speaking plainly and not in obscure figures of speech to be understood? Their claim to understand seems a bit impulsive. It is difficult to believe that the disciples have really understood the full implications of Jesus’ words, although it is true that he spoke to them plainly and not figuratively in 16:26–28. The disciples will not fully understand all that Jesus has said to them until after his resurrection, when the Holy Spirit will give them insight and understanding (16:13).

John 16:30 “Now we know that You know all things, and have no need for anyone to question You; by this we believe that You came from God.”

  • are: John 16:17 5:20 21:17 Heb 4:13 
  • by: John 17:8 

Now we know that You know all things, and have no need for anyone to question You; by this we believe that You came from God.”

John 16:31 Jesus answered them, “Do you now believe?

  • Do: John 13:38 Lu 9:44,45 

Jesus answered them, “Do you now believe

John 16:32 “Behold, an hour is coming, and has already come, for you to be scattered, each to his own home, and to leave Me alone; and yet I am not alone, because the Father is with Me.

  • the hour: John 4:21,23 5:25,28 12:23 
  • that: Zec 13:7 Mt 26:31,56 Mk 14:27,50 Ac 8:1 2Ti 4:16,17 
  • every: John 20:10 
  • own: or, own home
  • yet: John 8:16,29 14:10,11 Isa 50:6-9 

Behold, an hour is coming, and has already come, for you to be scattered, each to his own home, and to leave Me alone; and yet I am not alone, because the Father is with Me.

NET NOTE - The proof of Jesus’ negative evaluation of the disciples’ faith is now given: Jesus foretells their abandonment of him at his arrest, trials, and crucifixion (I will be left alone). This parallels the synoptic accounts in Matt 26:31 and Mark 14:27 when Jesus, after the last supper and on the way to Gethsemane, foretold the desertion of the disciples as a fulfillment of Zech 13:7: “Strike the shepherd, and the sheep will be scattered.” Yet although the disciples would abandon Jesus, he reaffirmed that he was not alone, because the Father was still with him.

John 16:33 “These things I have spoken to you, so that in Me you may have peace. In the world you have tribulation, but take courage; I have overcome the world.”

  • in me: John 14:27 Ps 85:8-11 Isa 9:6,7 Mic 5:5 Lu 2:14 19:38 Ro 5:1,2 Eph 2:14-17 Php 4:7 Col 1:20 2Th 3:16 Heb 7:2 13:20,21 
  • In the: John 15:19-21 Ac 14:22 Ro 8:36 2Co 7:4 1Th 3:4 2Ti 3:12 Heb 11:25 1Pe 5:9 Rev 7:14 
  • but: John 14:1 Ac 9:31 23:11 27:22,25 2Co 1:3 13:11 1Th 3:7 
  • I: John 16:11 12:31 1Sa 17:51,52 Ps 68:18 Ro 8:37 Ga 1:4 6:14 1Jn 4:4 1Jn 5:4-5

Related Passages:

1 John 5:4-5+  For whatever is born of God overcomes the world; and this is the victory that has overcome the world–our faith.  5 Who is the one who overcomes the world, but he who believes that Jesus is the Son of God? (See rewards to every saint because every saint is an overcomer in Christ - Rev. 2:7; Rev. 2:11; Rev. 2:17; Rev. 2:26; Rev. 3:5; Rev. 3:12; Rev. 3:21)

DISCIPLES ARE OVERCOMERS 
IN CHRIST THE OVERCOMER

These things - See earlier note

I have spoken to you, so that in Me you may have peace. In the world you have tribulation, but take courage; I have overcome the world (kosmos)

NET NOTE - The Farewell Discourse proper closes on the triumphant note I have conquered the world, which recalls 1:5 (in the prologue): “the light shines on in the darkness, but the darkness has not mastered it.” Jesus’ words which follow in chap. 17 are addressed not to the disciples but to his Father, as he prays for the consecration of the disciples.

J I PackerI quote this testimony at random from a Christian newspaper: “My husband. . .and I were youth directors in our church. . .when our two-and-a half-year-old son accidentally drowned. We had lived for the Lord and never lost anyone. We thought we would be spared such things. I went through four years numb, not understanding, not accepting my anger, continuing to try to be strong. I really was not talking to anyone about the pain and finally went into deep depression.”  The nurture that leaves Christians with false expectations of this kind, and with no resources except the stiff upper lip for coping when trouble strikes, is defective to the point of cruelty. Where do these expectations come from? Are they just wishful thinking, or have they been induced by external factors? It seems very plain that the salesman-like man-centeredness of so much of our evangelism that exalts the benefits, minimizes the burdens of the Christian life (2Ti 3:12+, Php 1:29+, 1Pe 1:6-7+, etc) and thereby fixes the thought patterns of converts, is one root cause of such false expectations. How could we purge evangelism of its excessive and damaging subjectivity? The short answer is by learning to keep in step with the Spirit's New Covenant ministry and to focus more directly on Jesus Christ himself as Savior God; model human being; coming judge; lover of the weak, poor, and unlovely; and leader of cross-bearing along the path that he himself trod. What are the benefits and burdens of the Christian life? Are people in your church being presented with the truth about Christian commitment? Pray for someone going through a death experience to be led out into resurrection. (BORROW Your Father Loves You - Daily Insights for Knowing God


Tribulation (2347thlipsis from thlibo = to crush, press together, squash, hem in, compress, squeeze in turn derived from thláo = to break) originally expressed sheer, physical pressure on a man. Thlipsis is a strong term which does not refer to minor inconveniences, but to real hardships. Medically thlipsis was used of the pulse (pressure). It is a pressing together as of grapes. It conveys the idea of being squeezed or placed under pressure or crushed beneath a weight. When, according to the ancient law of England, those who willfully refused to plead guilty, had heavy weights placed on their breasts, and were pressed and crushed to death, this was literally thlipsis. The iron cage was stenochoria (see below). Thlipsis thus refers not to mild discomfort but to great difficulty. Thlipsis was used of squeezing olives in a press in order to extract the oil and of squeezing grapes to extract the juice. In Scripture the word thlipsis is perhaps most often used of outward difficulties, but it is also used of emotional stress related to the difficulties. Morris notes that "No one likes troubles of this kind, but they may be seen as difficulties to be overcome, as ways of opening up new possibilities. One who sees them in this light glories in them." (Ro 5:3-5)

Thlipsis is used 45 times in the NT is translated: affliction (inflicting on a person something that is hard to bear), 14; afflictions, 6; anguish, 1; distress (the state of being in great trouble), 2; persecution (harassment in a manner designed to injure, grieve, or afflict), 1; tribulation (distress or suffering resulting from oppression or persecution), 16; tribulations, 4; trouble, 1

Book