2 Corinthians Commentaries & Sermons

2 CORINTHIANS RESOURCES
Commentaries, Sermons, Illustrations, Devotionals


2 CORINTHIANS - PAUL'S MINISTRY IN THE LIGHT OF THE INDESCRIBABLE GIFT
Click chart to enlarge
Charts from Jensen's Survey of the NT - used by permission
Another Chart from Charles Swindoll
A Third Chart 
Overview of
Second Corinthians
2Co 1:1-7:16
Character
of Paul
2Co 8:1-9:15
Collection
for the Saints
2Co 10:1-12:21
Credentials
of Paul
Testimonial & Didactic Practical Apologetic
Past:
Misunderstanding & Explanation
Present:
Practical Project
Future:
Anxieties
Apostle's Conciliation, Ministry & Exhortations Apostle's Solicitation for Judean Saints Apostle's Vindication
of Himself
Forgiveness, Reconciliation
Gratitude
Confidence Vindication

Ephesus to Macedonia:
Change of Itinerary
Explained

Macedonia: Preparation for Visit to Corinth

To Corinth:
Certainty and Imminence
of the Visit

2Co 1:1-7:16

2Co 8:1-9:15

2Co 10:1-12:21

2Corinthians written ~ 56-57AD - see Chronological Table of Paul's Life and Ministry

Adapted & modified from Jensen's Survey of the New Testament (Highly Recommended Resource) & Wilkinson's Talk Thru the Bible


INTRODUCTIONS TO SECOND CORINTHIANS:


"From Philippi to Corinth with Love"

INTRODUCTORY THOUGHTS
2 CORINTHIANS

CITY OF CORINTH - Corinth was the capital of Achaia and located 40 miles west of Athens on the narrow isthmus connecting Peloponnese (on the south) with northern mainland of Greece (all uses of "Corinth" - Acts 18:1+; Acts 19:1+; 1 Cor. 1:2+; 2 Cor. 1:1, 23+; 2 Ti 4:20+). Corinth was located between the Aegean and Adriatic Seas (see map below) and was a port city about five miles in circumference just south of the sharply rising 2000 foot Acrocorinth (see picture and see map "G") from which Athens could be seen on a clear day.  The Temple of Aphrodite (Roman = Venus) was located on the Acrocorinth and housed the 1000 "priestesses" employed as hierodouloi (from hieros = consecrated to deity +  doulos = bondservants) who served as temple prostitutes to facilitate idolatrous "worship" (cf "sacred prostitution"). As an aside it is notable that Scripture often associates sexual immorality (porneia) with idolatry (eidololatreia) (cf 1 Cor 5:11+, 1 Cor 6:9+, Eph 5:5+, Rev 2:20+, Rev 21:8+). And remember that Paul also associated idolatry with covetousness writing that "greed...amounts to idolatry." (Col 3:5+, Eph 5:5+Worship at the temple involved sexual encounters with these "priestesses" and this attracted "worshipers" from all across the Roman world. It is even recorded that the sandals of these notorious priestesses of Aphrodite were studded with an imprint that spelled our "Follow me" in the dust of the street (What a contrast with Jesus' call to "Follow Me" - Mt 4:19)! One cannot help but think of similar seductive pictures found on the internet even on seemingly innocent sites such as news pages! Clearly this illicit "worship" was a great temptation to the Christians at Corinth (just as is the internet to Christian's today!) as evidenced by Paul's exhortations and warnings in this first letter (1 Cor 5:1, 9,10, 11+, 1 Cor 6:9-11, 12-17, 18, 19, 20+). The immoral condition of Corinth is vividly seen in the fact that the Greek term (coined by Aristophanes) Korinthiazomai (lit., to act the Corinthian) came to mean "to practice fornication." Aleiphro wrote "I did not enter Corinth after all, for I learned in a short time the sordidness of the rich there and the misery of the poor." 

"Ships wanting to avoid the dangerous trip around the southern tip of Greece were dragged across that isthmus. The city boasted an outdoor theater that accommodated 20,000 people (See reconstruction of Corinth circa A D 100 - map similar to one below but more place names), athletic games second only to the Olympics, a Greek, Roman, and Oriental population....There were taverns on the south side of the marketplace, and many drinking vessels have been dug up from those liquor lockers. Corinth was noted for everything sinful." (Charles Ryrie) Every shop in the city had a deep, spring-fed well in which to cool containers of wine. Strabo wrote that "All the people of Corinth gorge themselves." It was even customary in stage plays for actors to come on stage drunk.

In the picture below note the agora which was the city's marketplace and the Bema which was the judgment seat. Corinth had an extensive commerce, like all the large towns on the Mediterranean Sea, and became celebrated for its wealth, magnificence, and learning. Corinth's pottery, brass and marble for building columns were famous throughout the world. The city is now desolate with just a little village near the ancient Corinth. There is, however, a modern city of Corinth, a few miles away, with about twenty thousand inhabitants. Archaeologists have also discovered a broken lintel (part of a door) bearing the Greek description "synagogue of Hebrews."

Paul preached at Corinth about A.D. 53 for eighteen months (Acts 18:11+). He paid Corinth a short second visit during the period A.D. 54–57, not mentioned specifically in Acts but implied in 1 Cor. 16:7+; 2 Cor 12:14+; 2Cor 13:1+, where he speaks of an intended third journey to Corinth which coincides with that in Acts 20:2+. He spent three winter months in Corinth (A.D. 57 and 58), during which he wrote the Epistle to the Romans (Acts 20:2, 3+ [cf. 1 Cor. 16:6]; Ro 16:1+).


Click to Enlarge
From Cryptotheology (no longer active website)


Ruins of City with Acrocorinth Location of Immoral Temple of Aphrodite

2 Corinthians  1:1  Paul, an apostle of Christ Jesus by the will of God, and Timothy our brother, to th

Kay Arthur adds that "Sin abounded in the cosmopolitan city of Corinth...The Corinthians were intrigued by Greek philosophy and captivated by the disciplined training and athletic events (see events) held at the Isthmus (see Isthmian Games). At one time the city was home to at least 12 pagan temples. The people desperately needed to hear the Good News of Jesus Christ, the One crucified for sinners. The worship ceremonies carried out by a thousand temple prostitutes connected with the temple of Aphrodite (the goddess of love) bred blatant immorality throughout Corinth....Prostitutes openly plied their "wares," and meat markets thrived on sales from the sacrifices offered in the temples. The Corinthians ate well, satisfied their sexual urges without condemnation, flirted with the wisdom of men, and did all they could to keep their bodies as beautiful as those of the Greek gods. They loved to listen to great orators. For the 250,000 citizens (not slaves) there were almost two slaves per person (Ed: Therefore the total population was about 700,000). What more did Corinth need? Freedom! Freedom from sin and death. God met that need by blocking Paul at every hand on his second missionary journey (cf Acts 16:6, 7, 8) until he received the Macedonian call "Come and help us." (Acts 16:9) After establishing the Corinthian church, Paul eventually went to Ephesus, where he stayed for three years. From there he wrote his first epistle to the Corinthian believers, who so desperately needed help and correction. It was sometime between A.D. 52 and A. D. 56." (Discover the Bible for Yourself

George Herbert - “What an admirable Epistle is the second to the Corinthians! How full of affections! He joys and he is sorry, he grieves and he glories; never was there such care of a flock expressed, save in the great Shepherd of the fold, who first shed tears over Jerusalem and afterwards blood.”

In summary, Corinth was a city with a prevalent pagan influence and a plethora of perversions (1 Cor 6:9,10) but despite these apparent obstacles to the Gospel, the Spirit enabled Paul to plant a church in the center of vice and idolatry on his Second Missionary journey (1 Cor 3:6, 10+; 1 Cor 4:15+; Acts 18:1–7+). 


Click to enlarge - from the Holman Bible Atlas (digital bookHardcover
copyright © 1998 B&H Publishing Group,
Used by permission, all rights reserved.
This is one of the best resources for Bible maps. 
Please do not reproduce this map on any other webpage.


Middletown Bible

Maps from Bible-History.com - courtesy of Wednesdayintheword.

Maps from Holman Bible Atlas - courtesy of Wednesdayintheword.

ESV Study Bible - Map of Corinth, Timeline

OTHER MAPS


Corinth:

Letters to the Corinthians

Paul

  • Baker’s Evangelical Dictionary: Paul the Apostle
  • Bridgeway Bible Dictionary: Paul
  • Easton’s Bible Dictionary: Paul
  • Fausset Bible Dictionary: Paul
  • Holman Bible Dictionary: Paul
  • Hastings’ Dictionary of the Bible: Paul the Apostle
  • Kitto’s Popular Cyclopedia of Biblical Literature: Paul
  • Morrish Bible Dictionary: Paul
  • International Standard Bible Encyclopedia: Paul, the Apostle
  • McClintock and Strong: Paul
  • The Nuttall Encyclopedia: Paul

Titus

  • Holman Bible Dictionary: Titus
  • Hastings’ Dictionary of the Bible: Titus
  • International Standard Bible Encyclopedia: Titus
  • McClintock and Strong: Titus
  • Kitto’s Popular Cyclopedia of Biblical Literature: Titus
  • Titus in 2 Corinthians: 2:13; 7:6; 7:13-14; 8:6; 8:16; 8:23; 12:18
  • Titus in rest of New Testament: Galatians 2:1-3; 2 Timothy 4:10; Titus 1:4

Inductive Bible Study on 2 Corinthians from Precept Ministries - 10 week study of this great epistle


COMPARISON OF
1ST AND 2ND CORINTHIANS

1 CORINTHIANS

2 CORINTHIANS

Objective
and practical

Subjective
and Personal

Insight into the Character
of an Early Church

Insight into the Character
and Ministry of Paul

Deliberate
Instruction

Impassioned
Testimony

Warns Against 
Pagan Influences

Warns Against
Judaistic Influences

From Irving Jensen    

2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY
VERSE BY VERSE
BRUCE HURT
2021

Comments, quotes, word studies, devotionals, outlines, "THOUGHTS" (practical applications), etc

2 CORINTHIANS 1

2 CORINTHIANS 2

2 CORINTHIANS 3

2 CORINTHIANS 4

2 CORINTHIANS 5

2 CORINTHIANS 5 - These notes are less in depth

2 CORINTHIANS 6

2 CORINTHIANS 7

2 CORINTHIANS 8

2 CORINTHIANS 9

2 CORINTHIANS 10

2 CORINTHIANS 11

2 CORINTHIANS 12

2 CORINTHIANS 13


MULTIPLE RESOURCES BY CHAPTER - sermons, commentaries, devotionals, etc

 

HENRY ALFORD
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY
The New Testament for English Readers

Read his fascinating brief biography - Henry Alford and Phil Johnson's related comments

James Rosscup writes that Alford's series on the New Testament "contains much that is valuable in the Greek New Testament...though all of the Greek New Testament words have been changed to English throughout." (Commentaries for Biblical Expositors: An Annotated Bibliography of Selected Works or Logos)

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (see his comments in following entry on Alford).

Editorial Note: If you are not proficient in Greek, you will find this work considerably more useful than the following work by Alford, because in this volume he translates the Greek and Latin into English. While the "The Greek New Testament" is longer (e.g., English version of 1John = 66 pages compared to Greek version = 94 pages in part because the latter includes comments of more technical nature), the substance of the commentary is otherwise similar to that found in the "NT for English Readers".

HENRY ALFORD
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY
The Greek New Testament

James Rosscup writes that "This was the great work in the life of the versatile Dean of Canterbury. An outcome of this production was the New Testament for English Readers (4 vols.). Alford was a Calvinist, conservative and premillennial, though not dispensational. He takes a literal interpretation of the thousand years in Rev. 20 and has a famous quote there, is strong on sovereign election as in Ro 8:29, 30 and 1Pe 1:2, but, unfortunately, holds to baptismal regeneration in such texts as Titus 3:5 and John 3:5. He shows a great knowledge of the Greek text and faces problems of both a doctrinal and textual nature." (Commentaries for Biblical Expositors: An Annotated Bibliography of Selected Works or Logos)

John Piper writes ""When I’m stumped with a...grammatical or syntactical or logical [question] in Paul, I go to Henry Alford. Henry Alford...comes closer more consistently than any other human commentator to asking my kinds of questions."

Charles Haddon Spurgeon writes that this text "is an invaluable aid to the critical study of the text of the New Testament. You will find in it the ripened results of a matured scholarship, the harvesting of a judgment, generally highly impartial, always worthy of respect, which has gleaned from the most important fields of Biblical research, both modern and ancient, at home and abroad. You will not look here for any spirituality of thought or tenderness of feeling; you will find the learned Dean does not forget to do full justice to his own views, and is quite able to express himself vigorously against his opponents; but for what it professes to be, it is an exceedingly able and successful work. The later issues are by far the most desirable, as the author has considerably revised the work in the fourth edition. What I have said of his Greek Testament applies equally to Alford’s New Testament for English Readers,* which is also a standard work." (Spurgeon, C. H. Lectures to my Students, Vol. 4: Commenting and Commentaries; Lectures Addressed to the students of the Pastors' College, Metropolitan Tabernacle)

MIKE ANDRUS
2 CORINTHIANS
SERMONS

About 180 pages of sermons on 2 Corinthians - recommended. The links below will access both the Audio and the Notes. The notes are excellent. 

PAUL APPLE
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY

WAYNE BARBER
2 CORINTHIANS
SERMON SERIES

WILLIAM BARCLAY
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY
Daily Study Bible

D Edmond Hiebert - Uses author's own translation. Especially valuable for the historical background material presented. Good word studies and various illustrations. (from Hiebert's critique of Barclay on Peter's epistles - "Barclay holds that Christ's descent into Hades gave those who there heard Him a second chance.")

Comment: I appreciate Barclay's unique insights on Greek words, but clearly his teaching about a "second chance" is NOT sound doctrine! Be an Acts 17:11 Berean with Barclay. See discussion of his orthodoxy especially the article "The Enigmatic William Barclay".


ALBERT BARNES
2 CORINTHIANS
COMMENTARY

James Rosscup writes that Barnes "includes 16 volumes on the Old Testament, 11 on the New Testament. The New Testament part of this old work was first published in 1832–1851. Various authors contributed. It is evangelical and amillennial...Often the explanations of verses are very worthwhile." (Commentaries for Biblical Expositors: An Annotated Bibliography of Selected Works or Logos)

C H Spurgeon "Albert Barnes is a learned and able divine, but his productions are unequal in value, the gospels are of comparatively little worth, but his other comments are extremely useful for Sunday-school teachers and persons with a narrow range of reading, endowed with enough good sense to discriminate between good and evil....Placed by the side of the great masters, Barnes is a lesser light, but taking his work for what it is and professes to be, no minister can afford to be without it, and this is no small praise for works which were only intended for Sunday-school teachers." (Spurgeon, C. H. Lectures to my Students, Vol. 4: Commenting and Commentaries; Lectures Addressed to the students of the Pastors' College, Metropolitan Tabernacle)

BRIAN BELL
2 CORINTHIANS
 SERMON NOTES

SAME MATERIAL - some duplication but does not include the older sermons above

JOHANN A BENGEL
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY
Gnomon of the New Testament

James Rosscup writes "This work (Gnomon), originally issued in 1742, has considerable comment on the Greek, flavoring the effort with judicious details about the spiritual life. It has much that helps, but has been surpassed by many other commentaries since its day." (Commentaries for Biblical Expositors: An Annotated Bibliography of Selected Works or Logos)

JOHANN BENGEL
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY
The Critical English Testament

Similar to above but less Greek. 

C H Spurgeon -- "'A Critical New Testament, so compiled as to enable a reader, unacquainted with Greek, to ascertain the exact English force and meaning of the language of the New Testament, and to appreciate the latest results of modern criticism.' Such is the professed aim of this commentary, and the compilers have very fairly carried out their intentions. The whole of Bengel’s Gnomon is bodily transferred into the work, and as one hundred and twenty years have elapsed since the first issue of that book, it may be supposed that much has since been added to the wealth of Scripture exposition; the substance of this has been incorporated in brackets, so as to bring it down to the present advanced state of knowledge. We strongly advise the purchase of this book, as it is multum in parvo, and will well repay an attentive perusal. Tischendorf and Alford have contributed largely, with other German and English critics, to make this one of the most lucid and concise commentaries on the text and teachings of the New Testament" (Spurgeon, C. H. Lectures to my Students, Vol. 4: Commenting and Commentaries; Lectures Addressed to the students of the Pastors' College, Metropolitan Tabernacle)

J H BERNARD
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY
Expositor's Greek Testament

JOSEPH BEET
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY

D Edmond Hiebert - A clear and full interpretation by a British Methodist scholar of the past century. Its doctrinal summaries are intended as a contribution to systematic theology.

BIBLE.ORG RESOURCES
Resources that Reference 2 Corinthians

BIBLICAL ILLUSTRATOR
2 CORINTHIANS
Joseph Exell, Editor

JOHN CALVIN
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY

CAMBRIDGE BIBLE FOR SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES
2 CORINTHIANS

RICH CATHERS
2 CORINTHIANS
SERMON NOTES

CHURCH PULPIT COMMENTARY
2 CORINTHIANS

ADAM CLARKE
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY

Click brief critique of Clarke

RON DANIEL
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY

BOB DEFFINBAUGH
2 CORINTHIANS
SERMONS

JAMES DENNEY
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY

The Expositor's Bible (1906) - see titles below

2 Corinthians Intro

2 Corinthians 1:1-7 Suffering and Consolation

2 Corinthians 1:8-14 Faith Born of Despair

2 Corinthians 1:15-20 The Church's One Foundation

2 Corinthians 1:21, 22 Christian Mysteries

2 Corinthians 1:23-2:4 A Pastor's Heart

2 Corinthians 2:5-11 Church Discipline

2 Corinthians 2:12-17 Christ's Captive

2 Corinthians 3:1-3 Living Epistles

2 Corinthians 3:4-11 The Two Covenants

2 Corinthians 3:12-18 The Transfiguring Spirit

2 Corinthians 4:1-6 The Gospel Defined

2 Corinthians 4:7-18 The Victory of Faith

2 Corinthians 5:1-10 The Christian's Hope

2 Corinthians 5:11-15 The Measure of Christ's Love

2 Corinthians 5:16, 17 The New World

2 Corinthians 5:18-21 Reconciliation

2 Corinthians 6:1-13 The Signs of an Apostle

2 Corinthians 6:14-7:1 New Testament Puritanism

2 Corinthians 7:2-16 Repentance Unto Life

2 Corinthians 8:1-15 The Grace of Liberality

2 Corinthians 8:16-9:15 The Fruits of Liberality

2 Corinthians 10:1-6 War

2 Corinthians 10:7-18 Comparisons

2 Corinthians 11:1-6 Godly Jealousy

2 Corinthians 11:7-29 Foolish Boasting

2 Corinthians 11:30-12:10 Strength and Weakness

2 Corinthians 12:11-21 Not Yours, But You

2 Corinthians 13 Conclusion

CHARLES ELLICOTT, EDITOR
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY

E H Plumptre author of this commentary

GARY EVERETT
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY

DOUG GOINS
2 CORINTHIANS
SERMONS

GOT QUESTIONS
"The Bible Has Answers"

GOT QUESTIONS  A very informative website which answers questions from a strictly Biblical perspective.

DAVE GUZIK
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY

MATTHEW HENRY
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY

CHARLES HODGE
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY

Cyril Barber - First published in 1859. This doctrinal commentary demonstrates the importance of exegesis in proper, biblical exposition. Also reveals the many facets of the apostle Paul's ministry. (The Minister's Library - Volume 2)

Note: Hodges entire 2 Corinthians Commentary on one Pdf

ICC NEW TESTAMENT COMMENTARY
2 CORINTHIANS

INTERVARSITY PRESS
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY

Cyril Barber - Belleville, Linda L. Second Corinthians. IVP New Testament Commentary. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1995. A careful study of 2 Corinthians that contains many new insights. The author aims at elucidating the meaning of the text, and in this she succeeds. A popular resource. (The Minister's Library - Volume 2)

2 Corinthians 1 Commentary

2 Corinthians 2 Commentary

2 Corinthians 3 Commentary

2 Corinthians 4 Commentary

2 Corinthians 5 Commentary

2 Corinthians 6 Commentary

2 Corinthians 7 Commentary

2 Corinthians 8 Commentary

2 Corinthians 9 Commentary

2 Corinthians 10 Commentary

2 Corinthians 11 Commentary

2 Corinthians 12 Commentary

2 Corinthians 13 Commentary

JAMIESON, FAUSSET, BROWN
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY

 Below are links to the unabridged version of JFB:

LANGE'S COMMENTARY
2 CORINTHIANS 
C F Kling

D Edmond Hiebert - A voluminous conservative Lutheran exposition. The epistles are divided into convenient paragraphs, with the material under each section appearing in three parts, exegetical and critical, doctrinal and ethical, homiletical and practical. Contains much rich ore to be mined by those willing to dig into its closely printed pages.

S LEWIS JOHNSON
2 CORINTHIANS
COMMENTARY AND SERMONS

Dr S. Lewis Johnson wrote the section on “The First Epistle to the Corinthians” in The Wycliʃe Bible Commentary which is the first set of links below:

Dr Johnson's Sermons on 2 Corinthians:

JOHN MACARTHUR
2 CORINTHIANS
SERMONS

Questions and Answers - John MacArthur

MISCELLANEOUS RESOURCES
2 CORINTHIANS 
Conservative, Evangelical

SERMONS AND STUDIES
ON 2 CORINTHIANS

BEST COMMENTARIES

"As we prepare to teach the 1990 Winter Bible study on 2 Corinthians, there are several important works worth noting. After several years of neglect by Pauline scholars, 2 Corinthians has now attracted the attention it deserves. With the forthcoming works by M. J. Harris in the New International Greek New Testament Commentary, and M. E. Thrall, in the new International Critical Commentary, the interest in this epistle will certainly continue to grow. This important epistle has numerous challenges for the interpreter. In many ways, it is simultaneously the most passionate and most difficult of the Pauline epistles. Emphasis on ministry, suffering, weakness, and genuine maturity will bring rewards for students, teachers, and hearers as well. For the evangelical student, the small work by M. J. Harris in vol. 10 of the Expositor's Bible Commentary (Zondervan, 1976), even though limited by space, is excellent and deserves careful reading and meditation. The top three full-leugth commentaries include C. K. Barrett (Harper, 1974), V. P. Furnish in the Anchor Bible (Doubleday, 1984), and R. P. Martin in the Word Bible Commentary (Word, 1985). Barrett's volume is outstanding, though his treatment of chaps. 10-13 will not satisfy everyone. Furnish has given us the most careful exegetical treatment and has not failed to tackle every major issue. If one disagrees with Furnish, it will require competent exegesis and theologizing to counter his conclusions. Martin's work is a bibliographical goldmine. It is worth consulting to trace out the important articles on the "problem passages" in 2 Corinthians 3, 5, and 10-13. Yet Martin evidences his growing tendency toward speculative interpretation, as well as E. Kasemann's influence upon him. 154 CRISWELL THEOLOGICAL REVIEW The second line of works on 2 Corinthians is headed by F. F. Bruce in the New Century Bible (Eerdmans, 1971). It is a brief work with great dependence on Barrett. P. Hughes, writing in the New International Commentary, has produced a solid and reliable theological work well worth consulting. Four other important works that need to be mentioned are: G. R. Beasley-Murray (Broadman, 1971); R. V. G. Tasker (Tyndale New Testament Commentary, 1958); C. Kruse (Eerdmans, 1987); P. Barnett, The Message of 2 Corinthians (InterVarsity, 1988). Some older works are difficult to find (ALL ARE AVAILABLE IN LINKS BELOW), but are nevertheless very useful. These include:

CYRIL BARBER - Recommendations for your library - The Minister's Library 3 and The Minister's Library 2 . See also 850 books for Biblical Expositors.

See also Commenting on Commentaries on 2 Corinthians by David Dockery - Southern Baptist Seminary - 6 pages, (1989)

  • Barnett, Paul William. The Message of 2 Corinthians: Power in Weakness. The Bible Speaks Today. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1988. With remarkable brevity Barnett gets to the heart of Paul's second letter to the believers in Corinth. He cuts through extraneous material and presents his readers with a clear exposition of the meaning of the text.
  • *Barrett, Charles Kingsley. A Commentary on the Second Epistle to the Corinthians. Harper's New Testament Commentaries. New York: Harper & Row, 1973. †An exegetical study that will be of help to the expository preacher. Barrett is always worth consulting.
  • Barnett, Paul William. The Second Epistle to the Corinthians. New International Commentary on the New Testament. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997. Replaces the famous volume by the late Philip E. Hughes. Assumes the unity of the letter, for which extensive argument is offered. Combines careful exegesis with a vindication of Paul’s person, mission and message. Exposes the teaching of “false apostles,” and discusses the resurrection and the hope of a new body. Not as good as Hughes, so if you have the former NICNT work, hold on to it.
  • Baughen, Michael. Strengthened by Struggle: The Stress Factor in 2 Corinthians. Wheaton, Ill.: Harold Shaw Publishers, 1984. "Baughen has effectively mixed his scholarship and pastoral gifts to bring us fresh insight into St. Paul's remarkable second letter to the Corinthian congregation. What he has demonstrated ... is that the doctrinal and moral issues that tore at the soul of Corinth are still with us today" (Gordon MacDonald).
  • Baumann, J. Daniel. Confronted by Love. Ventura, Calif: Regal Books, 1985. A brief exposition of God's principles for daily living from 2 Corinthians. Designed for adult discussion groups. It is to be regretted that this book was published on newsprint. The appearance alone will militate against widespread acceptance.
  • Belleville, Linda L. Second Corinthians. IVP New Testament Commentary. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1995. A careful study of 2 Corinthians that contains many new insights. The author aims at elucidating the meaning of the text, and in this she succeeds. A popular resource.
  • Bratcher, Robert Galveston. A Translator's Guide to Paul's Second Letter to the Corinthians. New York: United Bible Societies, 1983. This work is not a full-length commentary but, rather, an exegetical work dealing with problems translators face as they seek to bridge the gap between the world of the first century A.D. and the different cultures in which Paul's "successors" minister today
  • Bultmann, Rudolf Karl. The Second Letter to the Corinthians. Translated by R. A. Harrisville. Minneapolis: Augsburg Publishing House, 1985. Rearranges the text. Deals extensively with Paul's behavior in Corinth and provides important discussions of the words used to describe key concepts in his theology. Valuable references to Greek literature are interspersed throughout the text. Well-produced. 7
  • Danker, Frederick W. Second Corinthians. Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament. Minneapolis: Augsburg Publishing House, 1989. Danker is a careful expositor and a man of remarkable erudition and perception. Here is a brief exposition that many will find helpful.
  • Garland, David E. Second Corinthians. New American Commentary. Nashville: Broadman & Holman, 1999. An excellent exposition that is fully abreast of the latest scholarship. Deals adequately with Greek nuances, and combines historical and cultural material with an explanation of the theme of Paul’s letter. Of great value to preachers.
  • Gromacki, Robert Glenn. Stand Firm in the Faith: An Exposition of II Corinthians. Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1979. A well-balanced exposition using the text of the KJV Provides an excellent treatment of Paul's theme. Gives evidence of Gromacki's exemplary use of the original Greek. Recommended. 
  • Hafemann, Scott J. Suffering and Ministry in the Spirit: Paul's Defense of His Ministry in II Corinthians 2:14--3:3. Grand Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1990. Through careful and thorough exegesis
  • Hafemann shows how Paul portrays himself as "the Spirit-giver who suffers," whose importance as a God-sent revelatory agent of the Spirit is such that rejection of him is rejection of God. (He could as easily have developed the line of the theocracy and reached the same conclusion.) One pleasing feature of Hafemann's work is that, contrary to most modern biblical scholarship, he sees the unity and coherence of Paul's argument.
  • Hendricksen, William. New Testament Commentary. Vol. 14, II Corinthians by Simon J. Kistemacher. Grand Rapids: Baker, 1997. A pedantic work that expounds the text but offers little help when it comes to applying the truth of the Word to the life of the believer.
  • Kent, Homer Austin, Jr. A Heart Opened Wide: Studies in II Corinthians. New Testament Studies. Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1982. In his inimitable style, Kent expounds the theme of 2 Corinthians. His material is well researched and presented in a capable manner so that readers may draw maximum benefit from their study of this apostolic letter.
  • Laurin, Roy L. Second Corinthians: Where Life Endures. Grand Rapids: Kregel Publications, 1985. With genuine devotional warmth, Laurin explains how life endures and matures in accordance with the plan and purpose of God. Recommended.
  • Martin, Ralph Philip. Second Corinthians. Word Biblical Commentary. Waco, TX: Word Books, 1986. A learned commentary, fully abreast of the latest literary scholarship. The bibliographies at the beginning of each section are most helpful. The exegesis is such as to bring out new thoughts with a minimum of repetition from other commentators. Scant attention is paid, however, to the theme of the epistle. The primary values of this scholarly volume, therefore, lie in Martin's handling of the Greek text and his bibliographic references.
  • Thrall, Margaret E. A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Second Epistle to the Corinthians. In process. Edinburgh: T. and T. Clark, 1994- . Replaces the earlier work by Plummer. Gives evidence of the writer’s exacting scholarship. Makes plain the meaning of the original text. From the distinctions drawn by Miss Thrall the perceptive pastor should be able to enliven and sharpen the focus of each expository message that he bases on this very personal epistle.

CHRIS BENFIELD - sermons

CRAIG BLOMBERG

JIM BOMKAMP

F.F. BRUCE

W A CRISWELL - sermons

HENRY MORRIS

Paul's second canonical epistle to the church he founded at Corinth (there probably were at least two other letters he wrote to Corinth, but these have not been preserved—see 1 Corinthians 5:9 for a specific reference to one of them) was probably written less than a year after the first. It is uncertain whether it was written while he was still at Ephesus (Acts 19:10) or later at Philippi (Acts 20:1-6). In any case, there is almost complete unanimity among scholars that 2 Corinthians was indeed written by Paul. Like 1 Corinthians, it is cited by numerous church leaders in the second century (Clement, Irenaeus, Polycarp, etc.). After Paul's departure from Corinth, the church had been injured spiritually, not only by the divisions and immorality discussed by him in 1 Corinthians but also by certain of the "Christ party" (1 Corinthians 1:12), who were now falsely claiming to be apostles of Christ (2 Corinthians 10:7; 11:13), and trying to undermine Paul's teachings. They were corrupting God's Word (2 Corinthians 2:17), and Paul was forced both to defend himself and to rebuke these false teachers with great severity (2 Corinthians 10:7-12:13). The epistle also notes with approval that the immorality condemned in the first epistle had been effectively disciplined (2 Corinthians 2:1-11). Paul's definition and defense of the ministry and true ministers of God in 2 Corinthians 3-6 is especially noteworthy, as is his discussion of the Christian grace of giving in 2 Corinthians 8-9. In summary, the two Corinthian epistles are filled with rich spiritual and doctrinal truths and also with stern rebuke against sin and heresy, and also as abundant instruction for practical Christian living.

DEVOTIONALS - All of the devotionals below are compiled by 2 Corinthians and verse.

EXPLORE THE BOOK

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH JACKSON - J LIGON DUNCAN, DEREK THOMAS, et al

GOSPEL COALITION

JAMES GRAY

DAVID HOCKING - series of sermons

HOLMAN PUBLISHING

DAVID HOLWICK - frequent use of illustrations

IRVING JENSEN

JOURNAL ARTICLES RELATED TO 2 CORINTHIANS (from Biblical Studies)

EXCERPT - (From Conclusion) - This dunamis of God, which is such an important aspect of Paul's ministry and which is portrayed in 2 Corinthians, is .realised by the Holy Spirit. It is the glorious all-surpassing power of God through the Spirit in the midst of a broken earthly existence. Paul does not, however, say that power reveals itself as weakness (as maintained by Giittgemanns 1966: 168-169), but rather that it reveals itself in the midst of human weakness. Weakness (astheneia) is not identical with dunamis but it is the place where God's power through the Holy Spirit is revealed. Paul knew suffering and weakness, and yet the glorious power of the Spirit was a decisive reality in his life. This tension Paul interpreted in the light of the cross and resurrection of Jesus: 'He was crucified in weakness, yet he lives by God's power. Likewise we are weak in him, yet by God's power we will live with him. ' (2 Cor 13:4)

COLIN KRUSE - 2 Corinthians - Tyndale New Testament Commentary

DAVID LEGGE

LIFEWAY - sermons

LIGONIER MINISTRY - Devotionals

JOHN MACARTHUR

MARTIN MANSER - Dictionary of Bible Themes 

Enter 2 Corinthians and verse at top of page to retrieve the topics on a given verse. Click topic for short definition and list of Scriptures related to that topic. Very interesting. See example below:

2 Corinthians 1:1

     1651   numbers, 1-2
     5109   Paul, apostle
     5391   letters
     5661   brothers
     7120   Christians
     7709   apostles, authority

2 Corinthians 1:1-2

     5328   greeting

P G MATTHEW - sermons

ROD MATTOON - frequent illustrations

J VERNON MCGEE

BRYAN MACPHAIL - sermons

MONERGISM 

PHIL NEWTON - Mp3 only for the sermons without a link. Click for audios of all sermons.

WILLIAM ORR

MEYER PEARLMAN

A W PINK 

MATT POSTIFF

  • Introduction (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 1:1-2 (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 1:3-7 (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 1:8-11 (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 1:12-14 (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 2:5-11 The Obedience of Forgiveness (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 2:14-17 Fragrant Christianity (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 3:1-3. Hearty Letters of Recommendation (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 3:4-6. God?s Sufficiency in Ministry (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 3:7-11. Much More Glory (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 3:12-18. Open Glory or A Modern-Day Moses (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 4:1. God-Given Mercy (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 4:7-9. Weak Minister, Powerful Message, Part 1 (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 5:1. A Lasting Body (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 5:18-19. Reconciliation! (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 5:20-21. Diplomatic Christianity (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 6:1-2. Present Grace: Operating in Life (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 6:3-10. Demonstrating a Genuine Ministry (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 6:11-13. Reciprocal Love (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 6:14-7:1. Nothing in Common (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 7:2-7. Honest Care and Comfort (docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 7:8-16 (doc)
  • 2 Corinthians 8:1-5 (doc)
  • 2 Corinthians 8:6-15 (doc)
  • 2 Corinthians 8:16-24 (doc)
  • 2 Corinthians 9:1-7 (doc)
  • 2 Corinthians 9:8-15 (doc)
  • 2 Corinthians 10:7-18 (doc)
  • 2 Corinthians 11:1-15 (doc)
  • 2 Corinthians 11:16-33 (doc)
  • 2 Corinthians 12:1-6 (doc)
  • 2 Corinthians 12:7-10 (doc)
  • 2 Corinthians 12:11-18 (doc)
  • 2 Corinthians 12:19-13:4 (doc)
  • 2 Corinthians 13:5-6 (doc)
  • 2 Corinthians 13:7-14 (doc)

WIL POUNDS

REFORMATION STUDY BIBLE

RICK RENNER Sparkling Gems from the Greek

  • 2 Corinthians 11:27 -Excerpt - Is It Time for You To Make An Attitude Adjustment? In weariness and painfulness, in watchings often, in hunger and thirst, in fastings often, in cold and nakedness.2 Corinthians 11:27 I remember an employee we once had in our ministry who got distressed because she was transferred to an area of the ministry that didn't have air control to suit her taste. Those in charge tried to adjust the thermostat to her liking, but they could never seem to please this indi­vidual. First it was too cold, and then it was too hot. And that was just the beginning. Next, this per­son complained because her office didn't have a window. Nothing we could do seemed to please this worker. Because I believed this employee had great potential, I personally went to her to discuss her impossible-to-please attitude. If that employee was going to reach the level God desired for her, it would require a serious attitude change on her part. I wanted this unreasonable complaining to stop. When we hired this person, we had never agreed that she would be provided with a window or that we would meet the ideal atmospheric conditions she demanded. I talked through these complaints one at a time with this employee. We had bent over back­wards to make this person happy; now it was time for this employee to quit complaining and make an attitude adjustment in order to make me happy. Her constant complaining was bringing a spirit of discord into our organization that I didn't like. I decided I would not tolerate it any longer. When I first spoke to this person, she showed thankfulness for the correction. But by the next week, she was back at it again - mumbling, murmuring, complaining, and sowing seeds of discord. The temperature wasn't right; the chair at the desk wasn't comfortable; the lunch hour wasn't the exact time she desired; there was no window in her office, and on and on and on. When I saw that this employee wasn't going to make the attitude adjustment I required, I decided to make an adjust­ment myself by removing her from our staff. That was that person's last week in our office. It is unacceptable for us as Spirit-filled believers to be complaining people. After all, we are the ones who claim to possess the power of Almighty God! (Click for entire devotional)
  • 2 Corinthians 13:4 - Excerpt -  The Holy Spirit — A Partner Who Wants To Take Responsibility For You in This Life! The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Ghost, be with you all. Amen. — 2 Corinthians 13:14 Most all of us would say we want to live a victorious Christian life. But without daily communion with the Holy Spirit, it's impossible to attain that goal. Communion with the Holy Spirit is the launching pad for a life of supernatural power and consistency. In Second Corinthians 13:14, Paul says, "The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Ghost, be with you all. Amen." I want you to notice the word "communion" in this verse, because communion with the Spirit is what we are talking about today. The word "communion" is the Greek word koinonia, a word that has a whole flavor of meanings, but one primary meaning is that of partnership. An example of koinonia conveying the idea of partnership can be found in Luke 5:7 after Jesus supplied a miraculous catch of fish. After the fishermen had fished all night and caught nothing, Jesus told them to cast their nets on the other side. When they obeyed, they caught such a massive amount of fish that the nets began to break! (Click for entire devotional)

RAYMOND SAXE

  • 2 Corinthians 4:16-18 ( docpdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 5:8-11 (pdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 5:14-16 (pdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 6:11-18 (pdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 8:5 (pdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 8:9 (pdf)
  • 2 Corinthians 12:7-10 (pdf)

SAM STORMS

MEDITATIONS ON 2 CORINTHIANS - Sam Storms

  • The Jealousy of God in the Heart of a Human (2 Cor. 11:1-2) Excerpt - Few people can maintain a godly balance between sarcasm and sincerity. The latter is all too often swallowed up and eclipsed by the former. The apostle Paul was a notable exception to that general rule. The sarcasm of the apostle is quite evident in the opening words of 2 Corinthians 11.
  • 10 Things You Should Know about the Jealousy of God 
  • Father of the Bride (2 Cor. 11:2)  - Excerpt - I’d like to conduct an experiment. I want you to think about your local church, regardless of its denominational affiliation or lack thereof. Do you have it in mind? Are you ready? OK. Now, what’s the first word that comes to mind? Take a moment. Don’t be in a rush. I wish it were possible to compile a list of the many answers to my question. I’m sure it would be quite instructive and enlightening, perhaps even alarming. Words such as healthy, sick, vibrant, languishing, growing, shrinking, exciting, boring, traditional, contemporary, evangelical, and emerging would all probably be mentioned. But let me come straight to the point. I seriously doubt if anyone instantly and instinctively said, “virginal.” Virginal? Yes, virginal.
  • A Sincere and Pure Devotion to Christ (1)  - Excerpt - I want to be a person known for one thing. Although I’m an author, it matters little if people buy my books. Although I’m a speaker, it matters little if they hear what I say. What ultimately matters, what is of preeminent importance, is that I be a person known for “a sincere and pure devotion to Christ” (2 Cor. 11:3).
  • A Sincere and Pure Devotion to Christ (2) (2 Cor. 11:3)  - Excerpt - I fear the corruption of my sincere and pure devotion to Christ. So should you. To think that you are immune from the deceptive tactics of the enemy is both arrogant and dangerous. Paul feared that some of the Corinthians had been duped, or were on the verge of being so. That is why he speaks so energetically of his jealous concern for them and the state of their souls. 
  • The Horror of a Different Jesus (2 Cor 11:4) - Excerpt -  Our pluralistic, consumer driven society is all about choices, options, and diversity. If you don’t like what you see, be patient; another version, an updated edition, a new and improved alternative will soon appear. This is often the case in certain expressions of contemporary “Christianity” (so-called). Don’t like the Jesus of evangelical, orthodox biblical faith? No problem. There are plenty of other Jesuses to choose from. There’s the liberal Jesus, the liberation Jesus, the Christ of the cults, and the Christ of Islam. There’s the entirely human but not so divine Jesus or, if you prefer, the entirely divine and hardly human Christ. Or perhaps you relish a more homegrown Jesus, one that is fashioned after the desires of your own heart. Messianic pretender Philosophical sage? How about the Jesus of Dan Brown’s Da Vinci Code? Or the Jesus of The Gospel of Judas? If you’re into politics, cast your vote: the Democratic Jesus or the Republican version? Too political? That’s OK—he can be as revolutionary, politically incorrect, and nonconformist as you need him to be. After all, when it comes to Jesus, to each his own! 
  • Price-less Preaching (Don’t Ignore the Hyphen) (2 Cor. 11:5-12) Excerpt - When one first reads 2 Corinthians 11:7–12, it sounds outlandish, virtually incomprehensible. Paul preached the gospel of God in Corinth for free. He refused to accept payment for his ministry in that city. He labored tirelessly with his hands to support himself so that he need never take up an offering after proclaiming the truth. And they accused him of committing a sin in doing so! As I said, outlandish and incomprehensible! 
  • Knowing your Enemy (2 Cor. 11:13-15) Excerpt - One of the things I learned about my wife on our first date was that she didn’t believe in a real, personal devil. Having been raised in a liberal, mainline denominational church, she rarely if ever heard the gospel proclaimed, while numerous biblical truths were routinely mocked and denied, Satan’s existence being one. Whether or not one believes that a literal, personal, spiritual being called Satan actually exists depends on one’s view of the inspiration and authority of Scripture. If one affirms the latter, he or she will affirm the former (as is now the case with my wife!). The opposite almost always holds true as well. 
  • The Devil Disguised and the False Apostles who serve him (2 Corinthians 11:13–15)  Excerpt - Before departing from Ephesus, the apostle Paul gathered to himself the elders of the church and spoke words of encouragement, exhortation, and stern warning. The latter proved to be prophetic. “I know that after my departure,” Paul said, “fierce wolves will come in among you, not sparing the flock; and from among your own selves will arise men speaking twisted things, to draw away the disciples after them” (Acts 20:29–30). It’s simply stunning to think that from within the body of Christ, indeed, from within that very group to whom has been given the sacred task of leading and teaching the people of God, “fierce wolves” will emerge. Such people have no regard for the spiritual health of God’s people. They have even less regard for the truth. They are utterly self-serving. In order to gain a following and increase their authority, they speak “twisted things” and undermine the confidence of God’s people in the finality and sufficiency of the work of Christ.
  • Answering a Fool according to His Folly (2 Corinthians 11:16–21) Excerpt - Some have struggled to reconcile Proverbs 26:4 (“Answer not a fool according to his folly, lest you be like him yourself”) with Proverbs 26:5 (“Answer a fool according to his folly, lest he be wise in his own eyes”). But there’s no contradiction here. On most occasions, when a fool speaks, keep your mouth shut. There are times, though, albeit rare, when an answer is essential. Evidently Paul was faced with just such a situation in his relationship with the Corinthians. In 2 Corinthians 11:16–21 Paul is about to boast, and he is sickened by the thought of it. His words “are no reflection of the real Paul, but only of the Paul who, to preserve the Corinthian church from moral and doctrinal seduction, must answer the real fools according to their folly.” He is clearly compelled, contrary to normal practice (Prov. 29:4), to momentarily stoop to the level of his enemies to gain a hearing with the Corinthians and hopefully bring to an end the slanderous accusations brought against him.
  • Writing Your Spiritual CV (2 Corinthians 11:21–23) - Excerpt - Reading 2 Corinthians 11:21–33 leaves me breathless. Even more important, it leaves me embarrassed and ashamed. It reminds me of those many occasions when people have asked me to share my spiritual journey or perhaps themselves proceeded to recite what they consider my accomplishments in life and my achievements in ministry. Awards I’ve won. Pulpits I’ve filled. Books I’ve written. Places I’ve traveled. People I’ve known. Money I’ve raised. Sermons I’ve preached. Endorsements I’ve received. Churches I’ve pastored. Degrees I’ve earned. Enough already!
  • Suffering is a Gift of God! (2 Cor. 11:24-25)  - Excerpt - The first time I can remember being struck repeatedly by an instrument was in the fifth grade at Fannin Elementary School in Midland, Texas (yes, my father spanked me, but always with his open hand). Mr. Holmes, my teacher, was a short but powerful man who seemed at times to relish the opportunity to discipline rowdy young boys like me. And yes, we certainly deserved it (or at least I did). 
  • Through many Dangers, Toils, and Snares (2 Cor. 11:26-27) - Excerpt - In the aftermath of 9/11 and with the ever-increasing price of gasoline, traveling has become something of a hassle. Increased air fares, long security lines that often move at a snail’s pace, overcrowded flights, delayed flights, canceled flights, well, you get the picture. I must confess that on a couple of occasions I’ve lost my patience at such inconveniences, although I’ve tried not to direct my displeasure toward ticket agents and flight attendants who have no control over the variety of factors that create the problem.  During these past few years, ministry has taken me throughout the United States and on multiple trips overseas. But I have to confess, I’ve always felt safe, even pampered. Because of the frequency of my journeys I’ve attained elite status with American Airlines and routinely am upgraded to first class. Wherever I have gone, my hosts have been gracious and occasionally lavish in providing for my needs. I’ve had good drivers (for the most part) and adequate accommodations. 
  • Paul the Pastor (2 Cor. 11:28-29) Excerpt - Caricatures are hard to shake. Once people have an image of someone indelibly printed in their minds, not even the facts can dislodge it. As a student of Jonathan Edwards (1703–1758) I’ve seen this firsthand. Ask the man on the street (or even the person in the pew) about Edwards, and they’ll immediately mention his sermon “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” and how stern, negative, and condemning a personality he must have been. Of course, anyone who has spent time reading Edwards knows he was nothing of the sort. But the image is probably here to stay. Much of the same is true when it comes to the apostle Paul. His sharp theological mind, together with his unflinching and uncompromising stand for truth, have contributed to an image of him as being a relationally stunted, remote, ivory tower pinhead who had little time and even less compassion for people and their problems. I trust that as you’ve read through 2 Corinthians you’ve come to see how much of a distortion this is and how it fails to grasp the true heart of this deeply passionate and profoundly tenderhearted man of God. 
  • Boasting in Weakness (2 Cor. 11:30-33) Excerpt -  We are all pretty adept at avoiding embarrassing topics. Most people have learned the art of maneuvering a conversation away from anything that might show them in a bad light or disclose their incompetence. And should it happen that some shameful item is noted, we’re also pretty good at explaining it away or justifying it to protect our public image. Anything to save face! So what are we to make of Paul’s statement in 2 Corinthians 11:30 where he declares, “If I must boast, I will boast of the things that show my weakness”? One would think that if Paul’s hand were forced and he had to stoop to the level of his enemies in this matter of boasting, the least he could do was think up a few praiseworthy accomplishments or something that would silence his accusers.
  • OF VISIONS AND REVELATIONS (2 COR. 12:1) In the late spring of 2008, news erupted and spread like wildfire that a "heaven-sent healing revival" had broken out in Lakeland, Florida, through the ministry of a young, fully-tattooed evangelist named Todd Bentley. As I write this meditation, the meetings have continued unabated for four months. During this time I've received hundreds of e-mails and telephone calls asking for my opinion of the "revival" and my assessment of Bentley. Since I have neither personally m...Read More ➔
  • A "RAPTURE" BEFORE THE "RAPTURE" (1) (2 COR. 12:2-4) As I read the Bible I've often tried to envision myself in the position of certain characters, especially those who experienced profound supernatural encounters with the Lord. How would I have reacted? Would I have been puffed up with an inflated sense of my own importance? Or would I have felt crushed by the immediate disclosure of my own comparative insignificance? Or would I, preferably, have been so captivated by the brilliance of God's glory that thinking of myself ...Read More ➔
  • "A" RAPTURE BEFORE "THE" RAPTURE (2) (2 COR. 12:2-4) What are we to make of people who speak so casually (if not flippantly) about multiple heavenly visitations that involve conversations with angels, apostles, and even Jesus? Let me be clear about one thing. I have no biblical or theological grounds for concluding that Paul's translation into the third heaven was a singular event in the history of the church, as if to suggest that no one else in any other era has ever experienced a similar encounter. But I'm more than a l...Read More ➔
  • CHARACTER AND CONDUCT, NOT CHARISMA (2 COR. 12:5-6) Most people spend their lives worried sick that others will not think highly enough of them. So they disguise their weaknesses. They magnify their strengths. They labor not to give offense. Much of their personality and relational style is far from natural, but has been carefully crafted to elicit the approval and praise of those whose respect they covet. The apostle Paul, to say the least, was a bird of a different feather. One of his greatest fears was that people wou...Read More ➔
  • PAUL'S THORN IN THE FLESH (1) (2 COR. 12:7-10) It seems reasonable, does it not, that an experience of the magnitude Paul describes in vv. 1-4 would serve to subdue and perhaps even eradicate sinful impulses from his soul? How could sin possibly continue to exert its influence in the heart of a person who saw and heard the things Paul did? Surely anyone who has been blessed with such a stunning privilege as was Paul would forever cease to sin. Surely anyone who heard such transcendently glorious things as fell on the...Read More ➔
  • PAUL'S THORN IN THE FLESH (2) (2 COR. 12:7-10) As noted in the previous meditation, there are four broad categories in which most of the interpretations of Paul's thorn have fallen. We now turn our attention to the two most popular (and likely) views. Many take the view of Chrysostom, a famous preacher of the fourth century. He was the first to suggest that the thorn is simply a reference to all the enemies of the gospel who opposed and persecuted Paul during his evangelistic and theological labors. Alexander the co...Read More ➔
  • MY GRACE, ALL SUFFICIENT, SHALL BE THY SUPPLY (2 COR. 12:8-10) Feeling weak today? Good. Yes, that's right, good! I'm not talking about your weakness for chocolate or alcohol or your weakness for sexual lust or any such thing. The weakness I have in mind is not sin. It has nothing to do with your refusal to obey God or your propensity for jealous rage or greed or your disinclination to forgive someone who betrayed you. The apostle Paul would never boast in wickedness or gladly acquiesce to evil in any form (cf. 2 Cor. 12:9-10). Wea...Read More ➔
  • WHY GOD DOESN'T ALWAYS HEAL (2 COR. 12:8-10) God loved the apostle Paul. Yet God sovereignly orchestrated his painful thorn in the flesh and then declined to remove it, notwithstanding Paul's passionate prayer that he be healed. We are not apostles. Yet, as his children, no less so than Paul, God loves us too. We don't know the nature of Paul's thorn, but each of us has undoubtedly suffered in a similar way, and some considerably worse. We, like Paul, have prayed incessantly to be healed. Or perhaps knowing of a l...Read More ➔
  • SIGNS AND WONDERS AND SARCASM (2 COR. 12:11-13) Some time ago I met with a former student of mine who was considering leaving his church. One of the leaders had openly slandered him and called his character, as well as his theology, into question. He asked for my advice. Knowing so little of the situation, and not being able to hear the other side of the story, I was reduced to directing his attention to Paul's counsel in Romans 12:18 - "If possible, so far as it depends on you, live peaceably with all." We explored ...Read More ➔
  • TO SPEND AND BE SPENT FOR OTHERS (2 COR. 12:14-18) I have to admit that at times I find myself losing patience with the Corinthians. In more honest moments, I'm flat out sick of them. Although centuries removed and without ever having met them, I still find them more than a little intolerable. How Paul was able to endure their ingratitude and arrogance, not to mention their suspicion of his integrity and intentions, is beyond me. Here again, in vv. 14-18, we encounter yet another inexcusable and groundless charge agains...Read More ➔
  • HUMBLED BY THE SIN OF OTHERS (2 COR. 12:19-21) 2 Corinthians is a vivid, often painful portrayal of the courage, honesty, and vulnerability of the apostle Paul. More so than in any of his other letters, in 2 Corinthians we hear his heart beat, we feel his passions, we are put in touch with his deepest fears and longings and loves. If one is looking for a paradigm of pastoral sensitivity and strength, of unyielding commitment to truth and purity together with compassion and profound concern for his converts, this is t...Read More ➔
  • TOXIC TRIUMPHALISM (2 COR. 13:1-4) We've had several opportunities in our study of 2 Corinthians to witness the destructive presence in that ancient city of what has been called triumphalism. For the sake of those who may have forgotten what the term means, it has in view, among other things, an over-realized eschatology in which the blessings of the age to come are presumptuously claimed as a spiritual entitlement in the present day. Along with this are an aversion to suffering as something beneath the d...Read More ➔
  • EXAMINE YOURSELF! TEST YOURSELF! (2 COR. 13:5-10) One of the greatest problems we face in the church today is the number of truly born again believers who struggle with the assurance of their salvation. They are burdened with fears that they may have committed the unpardonable sin or that their daily failures indicate the absence of saving grace. Their consciences are tormented by the lingering memory of a tainted past. Anxiety eats away at their hearts like a corrosive acid. They are desperate for some word that will b...Read More ➔
  • AND THE GOD OF LOVE AND PEACE WILL BE WITH YOU (2 COR. 13:11-13) There are several ways to measure Christian maturity, but perhaps none so revealing as how we respond to the demands of God when we're down. All too often we use our pain to justify sin. We appeal to how badly we've been treated or victimized or point to what we regard as injustice in order to ignore or evade our ethical responsibility. I don't know whether the Corinthians fell prey to this temptation or took the moral high ground, but Paul wasn't about to let them off ...Read More ➔
  • PRAISE GOD FROM WHOM ALL BLESSINGS FLOW! (2 COR. 13:14) We have come to the final verse of this remarkable New Testament epistle, and I am faced with a monumental, two-fold, task. On the one hand, I cannot (and do not want to) avoid saying something about the triune portrayal of God that Paul provides. The doctrine of God simply cannot be dismissed as theoretical or irrelevant. We are talking about God, are we not? On the other hand, there is profound practical encouragement to be gained from what Paul says that our great tr...Read More ➔
  • THE POWER OF 2 CORINTHIANS ON I-35 (2 CORINTHIANS) The day after I wrote the 99th meditation in this series of studies on 2 Corinthians, I was driving north on I-35 from Oklahoma City to Kansas City, a five hour journey. To help pass the time, I decided to listen to the reading of the English Standard Version of the New Testament on CD. It seemed only appropriate that I start with 2 Corinthians. I can't recall how long it took to get through the letter, but it was somewhere in the neighborhood of forty-five minutes. As I...Read More ➔

MICHAEL THOMPSON - 73 pages

EXCERPT - The Purpose of this Book 2 Corinthians is a fascinating letter. It takes us deep into the heart of Paul, and gives us his most personal message. In it we hear him run the gamut of emotions from ecstasy to depression, from joy to anger. We find him describing the shape of his ministry and revealing what makes him tick. We watch him work in crisis with a congregation surprisingly similar in some ways, perhaps, to our own. However, because of its complexity 2 Corinthians is not an easy letter to interpret; hence the need for this book. Transforming Grace aims to provide helpful notes and questions for thought for individuals and groups who wish to study the letter in detail. It offers a programme for six weeks of daily readings, but the material can be adapted to a shorter or longer period of study. This book is not intended to form a full commentary, since alternative explanations could not be explored here because of limitations of space.

JAMES VAN DINE

STEPHEN VOORWINDE - interesting analysis of the Apostle Paul in 2 Corinthians

Excerpt - Paul’s second letter to the Corinthians has been aptly described as “simply a pouring out of the man himself.” (Ralph Martin) It is certainly the most emotionally charged of Paul’s epistles. More than one commentator has referred to it as “a tumult of conflicting emotions.” (R H Strachan) The letter therefore provides a unique window into the apostle’s soul. Specific references to Paul’s emotions are found no less than thirty-five times, and twenty different Greek words are used.3 No less impressive is the range of emotions expressed. He despairs (2 Cor 1:8), experiences sorrow (2 Cor 2:1, 3; 6:10), is glad (2 Cor 2:2; 12:9, 15), rejoices (2 Cor 2:3; 6:10; 7:4, 7, 9, 13, 16; 13:9), feels anguish of heart (2 Cor 2:4), sheds tears (2 Cor 2:4), loves (2 Cor 2:4; 5:14; 6:6; 11:11; 12:15), is perplexed (2 Cor 4:8), groans (2 Cor 5:2, 4), has regrets (2 Cor 7:8), is afraid (2 Cor 7:5; 11:3; 12:20) and jealous (2 Cor 11:2), mourns (2 Cor 12:21) and burns with distress (2 Cor 11:29).4 Paul’s major emotions in the epistle would therefore seem to be joy/gladness (2 Cor 12x), sorrow (9x) and love (6x). Less common are fear (3x), perplexity/despair (2x) and regret (1x)

JOHN WHITCOMB

Excerpt - As born-again Christians, we truly rejoice at the thought of God’s wonderful promise and provision, that “if we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:9NKJV+).But how does this divine provision relate to Christ’s confrontation with His Church, His Body and Bride, at the Judgment Throne? Does this mean that 1 John 1:9+ eliminates the threat of losing a reward or a crown on that great day? This is a very confusing issue for many of God’s people today. 

One point must be settled immediately – the issue is the gain or loss of rewards, not of salvation! Thank God, “He who has begun a good work in you will complete it until the day of Jesus Christ” (Phil. 1:6+). “Having been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ . . . and rejoice in hope of the glory of God” (Ro 5:1-2+). “He who hears My word and believes in Him who sent Me has everlasting life, and shall not come into judgment, but has passed from death into life” (John 5:24). “And I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish . . . No one is able to snatch them out of My Father’s hand. I and My Father are one” (John 10:28-30).

On the other hand, the provision of awards for faithfulness is intended by our Lord to provide tremendous motivation for His people. As a matter of fact, all human beings have been programmed by God with this perspective! How would a military unit function efficiently if there were no rewards for self-discipline and diligence and courage? And what about governments, and industries, and schools? Would a student do his very best if there were no grades or honors or recognition at the end?....

(FINAL CONCLUSION)  God intends the béma confrontation to motivate each and every believer –  not just church leaders – to serve Him in spirit and in truth. It is not designed to be a horrible threat that produces depression and fear, but, rather, an encouragement to love and serve and obey Him from the heart. In this light, may we, as Christians, be more concerned than ever before about our testimony for the Savior Who loves us with infinite love, and paid the ultimate price for our redemption and future glorification.

COMMENTARIES
ON 2 CORINTHIANS

HENRY ALFORD

PAUL APPLE - RECOMMENDED

JOHANN BENGEL

J H BERNARD

BRIDGEWAY COMMENTARY - Donald Fleming

JOHN CHRYSOSTOM

GEORGE CLARK

THOMAS CONSTABLE - expository notes, well-done

JOHN DUMMELOW - brief comments, older but well done work

GER DE KONIG - See his short biography (Interesting commentary)

JAMES DENNEY

"J. Denney's (1894) older and out-of-print work is most reliable and helpful throughout." (David Dockery - Southern Baptist Seminary )

CHARLES ELLICOTT

WILLIAM EVANS

A C GAEBELEIN

GENE GETZ - essential principles, short videos

  • 2 Corinthians 1:1-7; A Perspective on Suffering: With God's help, we should view our afflictions as opportunities to encourage and comfort others who are suffering. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 1:8-11;  Prayer and Protection: When comforting others who are suffering, we should combine our concern with corporate prayer. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 1:12-2:4; Transparent Communication: When our motives and actions are misunderstood, we should be open and honest with God, ourselves, and those who are confused or even critical. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 2:5-11; Spiritual Restoration: When we confront sin in the life of a fellow Christian, our primary goal should always be repentance and restoration. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 2:12-17; Concern and Anxiety: As brothers and sisters in Jesus Christ, we should expect periods of anxiety that relate to the impact of sin on our relationships. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 3:1-18; Living Letters: We are to evaluate our ministry effectiveness by the Christlike changes that take place in people's lives. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 4:1-18; An Eternal Perspective: No matter what our circumstances in this life, we are to focus on God's grace and eternal values. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 5:1-21; Modeling the Message: To expose false religious leaders, we must first and foremost live authentic lives that demonstrate our faithfulness to Jesus Christ and His message. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 6:3-13; A True Test: To evaluate the depth of our commitment to Christ, we should consider the degree we are willing to endure discomfort as ambassadors for Christ. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 6:14-7:1; Proper Relationships: We should maintain spiritual fellowship with authentic spiritual leaders and avoid relationships with false prophets and deceptive teachers. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 7:2-16; Positive Feedback: We should look for opportunities to give positive feedback to those who serve as our spiritual leaders. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 8:1-7; Models of Generosity: All local communities of faith are to be models of generosity to other churches. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 8:8-15;  Motivated by Love: Though we have an obligation to be generous, our primary motivation for giving should be our love for God and for one another. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 8:16-24; Financial Integrity: When receiving and distributing financial gifts, every local church and parachurch ministry should entrust this responsibility to several trustworthy individuals. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 9:1-5; Financial Accountability: All of us--individually and corporately--should have a system of accountability to help us maintain our financial commitments to God's work. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 9:6-15;  Guidelines for Generosity: To live in God's will, we are to follow biblical guidelines for using and sharing our material resources. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 10:1-18; Self-Defense: When we are falsely accused, it is not wrong to defend ourselves, but when we do, we should always reflect the fruit of the Holy Spirit. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 11:1-15;  Defeating Satan: We should be alert to Satan's continual evil efforts to destroy local churches and other Christian ministries. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 11:16-33;  Servant-Leaders: Shepherds of God's people must become servant-leaders, following the example of Jesus Christ. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 12:1-10;  Encounters with God: Believers are to be cautious about anyone's claims to have received direct messages in God's holy presence. Video
  • 2 Corinthians 12:14-13:13; A Pastoral Passion: All spiritual leaders in God's churches should have one major goal--to help all believers become mature in Jesus Christ. Video 

JOHN GILL

L M GRANT 

F B HOLE - brief intro

H A IRONSIDE - commentary

HEINRICH MEYER Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

CHARLES HODGE

WILLIAM KELLY -  Plymouth Brethren

STEVE KRELOFF preaches from the perspective of a Messianic believer

PAUL KRETZMANN - commentary, Lutheran expositor

JAMES LIAS -- Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges 

F B MEYER - brief comments. 

J C PHILPOT - selected chapters and verses

ALFRED PLUMMER

PREACHER'S HOMILETICAL COMMENTARY

PULPIT COMMENTARY

PHILIP SMITH

THIRD MILLENNIUM STUDY NOTES

2 Corinthians 1

2 Corinthians 2

2 Corinthians 3

2 Corinthians 4

2 Corinthians 5

2 Corinthians 6

2 Corinthians 7

2 Corinthians 8

2 Corinthians 9

2 Corinthians 10

2 Corinthians 11

2 Corinthians 12

2 Corinthians 13

BOB UTLEY

J VERNON MCGEE 2 Corinthians Commentary - Zip File of Audios - complete book

JOHN SCHULTZ - 62 page commentary in pdf - Link to his main page with commentaries on all 66 books

JAMES SMITH - Handfuls on Purpose 2 CORINTHIANS

  • 2 Corinthians 2:14-17 THE TRIUMPHANT LIFE. 
  • 2 Corinthians 4:1-7 THE GOD OF THIS AGE.
  • 2 Corinthians 4:7-11 THE IDEAL LIFE.
  • 2 Corinthians 5:14-21 THE GREAT CHANGE.
  • 2 Corinthians 6:14-18; 7:1 A CALL TO SEPARATION
  • 2 Corinthians 10:3-7 OUR WARFARE.
  • 2 Corinthians 12:1-10 POWER IN WEAKNESS.

2 CORINTHIANS 1

CHUCK SMITH

THOMAS WATSON

BRYAN MACPHAIL

JAMES HASTINGS

THOMAS BROOKS

GREG HERRICK 

F B MEYER

JOHN PIPER

JOHN MACARTHUR

MATTHEW MEAD

C H SPURGEON

HAMPTON KEATHLEY

JONATHAN EDWARDS

JOHN PIPER

OCTAVIUS WINSLOW

JAMES SMITH

2 CORINTHIANS 2

GEORGE WHITEFIELD

J C PHILPOT

ALAN CARR - sermon

CHIP ANDERSON

JOHN PIPER

CHUCK SMITH

RON RITCHIE

JAMES HASTINGS

OSWALD CHAMBERS

WIL POUNDS

RICH CARLSON

HOMER A KENT, JR- Grace Theological Journal, Fall 1981

F B MEYER

C H SPURGEON

J. C. RYLE

2 CORINTHIANS 3

BRUCE HURT - IN DEPTH COMMENTARY - On Site

WILLIAM ARNOT

SERMONS BY VERSE - Older works but still useful

RANDALL C GLEASON

RON RITCHIE

F B MEYER

CHUCK SMITH

ALAN CARR

JOHN PIPER

C H SPURGEON

JAMES HASTINGS

J R MILLER

MARK STEVENSON

HOMER A KENT, JR- Grace Theological Journal, Fall 1981

WILLIAM S PLUMER

OCTAVIUS WINSLOW

OSWALD CHAMBERS

F B MEYER

JOHN MACARTHUR

2 CORINTHIANS 4

BRUCE HURT - IN DEPTH COMMENTARY On Site

SERMONS BY VERSE - Older works but still useful

JOHN PIPER

DAVID ROPER

A W PINK

WIL POUNDS

ALAN CARR

OSWALD CHAMBERS

JAMES SMITH

OCTAVIUS WINSLOW

J R MILLER

BRYAN MACPHAIL

JAMES HASTINGS

HOMER A KENT, JR- Grace Theological Journal, Fall 1981

DON FORTNER

THOMAS WATSON

F B MEYER

CHUCK SMITH

C H SPURGEON

THOMAS DOOLITTLE

J. C. RYLE

2 CORINTHIANS 5

BRUCE HURT - IN DEPTH COMMENTARY On Site

SERMONS BY VERSE - Older works but still useful

2 CORINTHIANS 5 RESOURCES - Multiple Sermons on Commentaries 

ROY METTS

CHUCK SMITH

ALAN CARR

GREGG ALLEN

JOHN PIPER

DON FORTNER

JAMES SMITH

JOHN WALVOORD

OSWALD CHAMBERS

JONATHAN EDWARDS

F B MEYER

C H SPURGEON

JOHN MACDUFF

RAY PRITCHARD

DAVID L. TURNER

JAMES SMITH

JAMES HASTINGS

PHIL NEWTON

GEORGE WHITEFIELD

JAMES SMITH

THOMAS WATSON

J R MILLER

HORATIUS BONAR

DON FORTNER

GENE BROOKS

SAMUEL DAVIES

G CAMPBELL MORGAN

WIL POUNDS

STEPHEN CHARNOCK

JAMES SMITH

2 CORINTHIANS 6

OSWALD CHAMBERS

DAVID ROPER

CHUCK SMITH

F B MEYER

J C PHILPOT

CHRISTIAN FRIEND

ALAN CARR

A W PINK

C H SPURGEON

THOMAS WATSON

GEORGE WHITEFIELD

J. C. RYLE

2 CORINTHIANS 7

BRUCE HURT - ON SITE

CHUCK SMITH

JOEL BEEKE

ALAN CARR

THOMAS WATSON

OSWALD CHAMBERS

C H SPURGEON

F B MEYER

DON FORTNER

BRYAN MACPHAIL

JOHN PIPER

THOMAS SHERMAN

JAMES HASTINGS

2 CORINTHIANS 8

RICHARD MELICK

GENE BROOKS

PHIL NEWTON

JOHN MACARTHUR

STEVEN COLE

JOHN STEVENSON

JOHN PIPER

WIL POUNDS

JOHN MACARTHUR

F B MEYER

CHUCK SMITH

JAMES HASTINGS

C H SPURGEON

2 CORINTHIANS 9

WIL POUNDS

JOHN PIPER

BRYAN MACPHAIL

GEORGE DAVIS

STEVEN COLE

GIL RUGH

JOHN MACDUFF

SCOTT PRYOR

F B MEYER

JAMES SMITH

ALAN CARR

CHUCK SMITH

C H SPURGEON

2 CORINTHIANS 10

PHIL NEWTON

BRUCE HURT - IN DEPTH COMMENTARY ON SITE

OSWALD CHAMBERS

F B MEYER

JAMES HASTINGS

RICK RENNER

CHUCK SMITH

2 CORINTHIANS 11

J. C. RYLE

CHUCK SMITH

RICK RENNER

HAMPTON KEATHLEY IV

F B MEYER

JOHN PIPER

2 CORINTHIANS 12

BRAD H YOUNG

PHIL NEWTON

JOHN PIPER

ALAN CARR

DANIEL AKIN

RONALD RUSSELL

JOHN MACARTHUR

WIL POUNDS

BRYAN MACPHAIL

JAMES HASTINGS

JOHN MACDUFF

J C PHILPOT

CHUCK SMITH

J R MILLER

BRUCE HURT - IN DEPTH COMMENTARY - ON SITE

F B MEYER

C H SPURGEON

DON FORTNER

DOUG GOINS

JOHN PIPER

2 CORINTHIANS 13

BRUCE HURT COMMENTARY ON SITE

JOHN MACARTHUR

RICK RENNER

PHIL NEWTON

THOMAS WATSON

C H SPURGEON

GEORGE WHITEFIELD

JAMES HASTINGS

F B MEYER

HENRY MAHAN
2 CORINTHIANS
SERMONS

Below is Henry Mahan's Commentary - distinct from the sermons above

2 Corinthians 1 2 Corinthians 2 2 Corinthians 3 2 Corinthians 4
2 Corinthians 5 2 Corinthians 6 2 Corinthians 7 2 Corinthians 8
2 Corinthians 9 2 Corinthians 10 2 Corinthians 11 2 Corinthians 12
2 Corinthians 13

ALEXANDER MACLAREN
2 CORINTHIANS
SERMONS

Or Here:

G CAMPBELL MORGAN
2 CORINTHIANS
COMMENTARY

D Edmond Hiebert (these are actually comments on Morgan's related work - see the online Pdf copy =  "The Corinthian Letters of Paul. An Exposition of I and II Corinthians") - Carefully outlined pulpit expositions by a noted expository preacher. Reflects the fervent devotional approach of the preacher in dealing with the problems that plague the Church.

There are 3 different resources by G Campbell Morgan

1. Commentary on 1-2 Corinthians

The Corinthian Letters of Paul. An Exposition of I and II Corinthians - notes on 2 Corinthians are brief and begin on page 137 of the Pdf

2. Commentary by Chapter from Analyzed Bible

3. Sermons on 2 Corinthians from the Westminster Pulpit collection: 

Click on this link and scroll down page to following sermons:

  • 2 Corinthians 4:5. Christ Jesus, The Lord.
  • 2 Corinthians 5:17, 18. Holiness: Its Fruit.
  • 2 Corinthians 5:19. God In Christ.
  • 2 Corinthians 7:1. Holiness: Conditions.
  • 2 Corinthians 8:7. The Grace Of Giving A Million Shillings!
  • 2 Corinthians 11:5. The Great Apostle.
  • 2 Corinthians 12:9. The All-Sufficient Grace.

ROBERT MORGAN
2 CORINTHIANS
SERMONS

NET BIBLE NOTES
2 Corinthians

HERMANN OLSHAUSEN
A Commentary on Paul's
First and Second Epistles to the Corinthians.

Cyril Barber - First published in 1855. This highly esteemed exegetical and expository work enlivens the sacred page and enriches the spiritual life of the reader. "Pays careful attention to the theological exposition, entering into the marrow of religious ideas, and introducing the student to the spirit and inward unity of the divine revelation" (Philip Schaff). (Click here for links to First Corinthians comments).

OUR DAILY BREAD
2 CORINTHIANS
DEVOTIONALS

Excellent sermon illustrations - the first list represents devotionals onsite followed by the list of off site devotionals by 2 Corinthians and verse.


JOSEPH PARKER
2 Corinthians
The People's Bible

PASTOR LIFE
2 CORINTHIANS SERMONS

ARTHUR PEAKE
2 CORINTHIANS

PETER PETT
2 CORINTHIANS

JOHN PIPER
2 CORINTHIANS
SERMONS

ALFRED PLUMMER
2 Corinthians
A Critical and Exegetical Commentary

1915 The International Critical Commentary Series - Alfred Plummer. 

D Edmond Hiebert - Greek text Important introduction and a very thorough treatment of the Greek text, bringing out its finer shades of meaning. Essential for the careful student of the original text.

MATTHEW POOLE
2 CORINTHIANS

RICHARD PRATT
2 CORINTHIANS
SERMONS

RAY PRITCHARD
SERMONS - 2 CORINTHIANS

Dr Pritchard's sermons are always worth checking out -- Scripturally sound and pithily practical! 

PULPIT COMMENTARY
2 CORINTHIANS
COMMENTARY

Hint: Click on expositions and scroll down for numerous additional homilies on individual passages.

A. T. ROBERTSON
Word Pictures
2 Corinthians

DON ROBINSON
Sermons on 2 Corinthians

ROB SALVATO
Sermons on 2 Corinthians
Calvary Chapel Vista

PHILIP SCHAFF
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY

SERMON AUDIO
2 CORINTHIANS

SERMON AUDIO - pdf transcripts - variable quality. Be a Berean. 

SERMON BIBLE COMMENTARY
2 CORINTHIANS

CHARLES SIMEON
Sermons on 2 Corinthians

NOTE: If you are not familiar with the great saint Charles Simeon see Dr John Piper's discussion of Simeon's life - you will want to read Simeon's sermons after meeting him! - click Brothers We Must Not Mind a Little Suffering (Mp3 even better)

Click the 2 Corinthians above for the sermons listed below. 

  • 2 Corinthians 1:3-4 The Trials & Consolations of Ministers Useful to their People
  • 2 Corinthians 1:12 The Testimony of a Good Conscience
  • 2 Corinthians 1:13 The Churchman's Confession
  • 2 Corinthians 1:20 The Stability of Promises
  • 2 Corinthians 1:21,22 The Different Operations of the Holy Spirit
  • 2 Corinthians 2:11 The Devices of Satan Exposed
  • 2 Corinthians 2:15-16 The Importance of Ministry
  • 2 Corinthians 3:2,3, Christians Are Epistles of Christ
  • 2 Corinthians 3:5 The Extent of Man's Impotency
  • 2 Corinthians 3:6 The Letter that Killeth and the Spirit that Giveth Light
  • 2 Corinthians 3:6 The Law and the Gospel Compared
  • 2 Corinthians 3:7-11 The Glory of the Gospel Above that of the Law
  • 2 Corinthians 3:15, 16 The Future Conversion of the Jews
  • 2 Corinthians 3:17 Christ the Soul of the Entire Scriptures
  • 2 Corinthians 3:18 The Excellency and Efficacy of the Gospel
  • 2 Corinthians 4:4-6 The Contest Between God and Satan
  • 2 Corinthians 4:7 Ministers, the Bearers of Rich Treasure
  • 2 Corinthians 4:11 The Trials of Christians the Means of Magnifying Their Lord
  • 2 Corinthians 4:17,18 The Christian's Experience in Affliction
  • 2 Corinthians 5:1-5 The Christian's Assured Prospect of Glory
  • 2 Corinthians 5:7 The Christian Walking by Faith
  • 2 Corinthians 5:10,11 The Doctrine of Future Judgment
  • 2 Corinthians 5:14, 15 The Constraining Power of Christ's Love
  • 2 Corinthians 5:17 The Christian a New Creature
  • 2 Corinthians 5:19, 20 The Ministry Of Reconciliation
  • 2 Corinthians 5:21 The Way of Reconciliation with God
  • 2 Corinthians 6:1, 2 The Grace of God Not to be Received in Vain
  • 2 Corinthians 6:4-10 The Character of a Christian Minister
  • 2 Corinthians 6:10 Paradoxical Experience
  • 2 Corinthians 6:11-13 Effects of the Gospel in Enlarging the Heart
  • 2 Corinthians 6:14-18 Separation from the World Enjoined
  • 2 Corinthians 7:1 Sanctification Wrought by Promises
  • 2 Corinthians 7:3 The Grounds of a Minister's Regard for His People
  • 2 Corinthians 7:10, 11 Repentance Exemplified in the Corinthian Church
  • 2 Corinthians 8:1-5 Liberality to the Poor
  • 2 Corinthians 8:7-8 Liberality to the Poor Recommended
  • 2 Corinthians 8:9 The Grace of Christ
  • 2 Corinthians 8:13-15 Liberality Encouraged
  • 2 Corinthians 9:12-15 The Benefit Arising from Attention to the Poor
  • 2 Corinthians 10:3-5 Efficacy of the Gospel
  • 2 Corinthians 10:15, 16 The Faithful Minister's Desires
  • 2 Corinthians 10:18 The Folly of Pride and Boasting
  • 2 Corinthians 11:2, 3 Godly Jealousy the Duty of Ministers
  • 2 Corinthians 11:23-29 St Paul's Zeal Illustrated and Improved
  • 2 Corinthians 11:29 Christian Sympathy
  • 2 Corinthians 12:7-9 The Success of Fervent Prayer
  • 2 Corinthians 12:10 A sense of Weakness Conducive to Strength
  • 2 Corinthians 12:14 The Duty of Ministers
  • 2 Corinthians 13:4 The Power of the Risen Savior
  • 2 Corinthians 13:5 Self Examination Recommended

CHUCK SMITH
2 CORINTHIANS

Commentary

Sermon Notes:

C. H. SPURGEON
All Spurgeon's Sermons
on 2 Corinthians

2 Corinthians 1

2 Corinthians 2

2 Corinthians 3

2 Corinthians 4

2 Corinthians 5

2 Corinthians 6

2 Corinthians 7

2 Corinthians 8

2 Corinthians 9

2 Corinthians 10

2 Corinthians 11

2 Corinthians 12

2 Corinthians 13

C H SPURGEON
Expositional Notes on
2 Corinthians

C H SPURGEON
Devotionals
on 2 Corinthians

RAY STEDMAN
Commentary
Expository Studies on 2 Corinthians
Power Out of Weakness

Cyril Barber - Fully in keeping with all we have come to expect of this gifted expositor and wise pastor. Explains this epistle in easy-to understand terms. (The Minister's Library - Volume 2)

LINKS BELOW BOOK "AUTHENTIC CHRISTIANITY: A FRESH GRIP ON LIFE"

Spiritual Warfare: The Battle of Life

2nd Corinthians Daily Devotionals

  1:  Why Does It Hurt So Much? 2 Corinthians 1:1-7
  2:  The Sentence Of Death 2 Corinthians 1:8-11
  3:  When You Are Misunderstood 2 Corinthians 1:12-2:4
  4:  Forgiveness: When Discipline Ends 2 Corinthians 2:5-11
  5:  Who Is Sufficient? 2 Corinthians 2:12-17
  6:  Do You Have What It Takes? 2 Corinthians 3:1-6
  7:  A Fading Glory 2 Corinthians 3:7-11
  8:  Freedom To Remove The Mask 2 Corinthians 3:12-18
  9:  Nothing But The Truth 2 Corinthians 4:1-4
10: From Darkness To Light 2 Corinthians 4:5-6
11: The Life Of Jesus In Mortal Bodies 2 Corinthians 4:7-15
12: Beyond The End 2 Corinthians 4:16-5:5
13: What's There To Live For? 2 Corinthians 5:6-17
14: The Word For The Hour 2 Corinthians 5:18-6:2
15: Sensible Fanaticism 2 Corinthians 6:3-10
16: The Reciprocity Of Love 2 Corinthians 6:11-13
17: Unequally Yoked 2 Corinthians 6:14-18
18: How To Repent 2 Corinthians 7:2-16
19: Grace And Giving 2 Corinthians 8:1-15
20: Giving Joyfully 2 Corinthians 8:16-9:15
21: Our Secret Weapons 2 Corinthians 10:1-6
22: The True Evaluation 2 Corinthians 10:7-18
23: Godly Jealousy 2 Corinthians 11:1-2
24: The Simplicity Of Christ 2 Corinthians 11:3-15
25: How To Boast 2 Corinthians 11:16-33
26: Strength In Weakness 2 Corinthians 12:1-10
27: The Remarkable Paradox 2 Corinthians 12:11-13
28: The Mark Of A True Servant 2 Corinthians 12:14-13:4
29: How To Examine Yourself 2 Corinthians 13:5-10
30: A Word Of Peace 2 Corinthians 13:11-14

JOHN SUTCLIFFE
2 CORINTHIANS COMMENTARY

THEOLOGY OF WORK
2 CORINTHIANS

GEOFF THOMAS
2 CORINTHIANS
SERMONS

2 Corinthians 1

2 Corinthians 2

2 Corinthians 3

2 Corinthians 4

2 Corinthians 5

2 Corinthians 6

2 Corinthians 7

2 Corinthians 8

2 Corinthians 9

2 Corinthians 10

2 Corinthians 11

2 Corinthians 12

2 Corinthians 13

TODAY IN THE WORD
MOODY BIBLE INSTITUTE
2 CORINTHIANS

MARVIN VINCENT
New Testament Word Studies
2 Corinthians

DANIEL WHEDON
2 CORINTHIANS

STEVE ZEISLER
2 CORINTHIANS
SERMONS

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DISCLAIMER: Before you "go to the commentaries" go to the Scriptures and study them inductively (Click 3 part overview of how to do Inductive Bible Study) in dependence on your Teacher, the Holy Spirit, Who Jesus promised would guide us into all the truth (John 16:13). Remember that Scripture is always the best commentary on Scripture. Any commentary, even those by the most conservative and orthodox teacher/preachers cannot help but have at least some bias of the expositor based upon his training and experience. Therefore the inclusion of specific links does not indicate that we agree with every comment. We have made a sincere effort to select only the most conservative, "bibliocentric" commentaries. Should you discover some commentary or sermon you feel may not be orthodox, please email your concern. I have removed several links in response to concerns by discerning readers. I recommend that your priority be a steady intake of solid Biblical food so that with practice you will have your spiritual senses trained to discern good from evil (Heb 5:14-note).